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SELECTIVE  MICROFILM  EDITION 
PARTY 
(1911-1919) 


Thomas  E.  Jeffrey 
Senior  Editor 

Brian  C.  Shipley 
Theresa  M.  Collins 
Linda  E.  Endersby 
Editors 

David  A.  Ranzan 
Indexing  Editor 

Janette  Pardo 
Richard  Mizclle 
Peter  Mikulas 
Indexers 


Paul  B.  Israel 
Director  and  General  Editor 


Sponsors 

Rutgers,  The  State  University  of  New  Jersey 
National  Park  Service,  Edison  National  Historic  Site 
New  Jersey  Historical  Commission 
Smithsonian  Institution 

A  UPA  Collection  from 

Ijjp  LexisNexis* 

7500  Old  Georgetown  Road  •  Bcthcsda,  MD  20814-6126 


iv-Edison  Company 


Thomas  A.  Edison  Papers 


Rutgers,  The  State  University  of  New  Jersey 
endorsed  by 

National  Historical  Publications  and  Records  Commission 
18  June  1981 

Copyright  ©2007  by  Rutgers,  The  State  University 


All  rights  reserved.  No  part  of  this  publication  including  any  portion  of  the  guide  and 
index  or  of  the  microfilm  may  be  reproduced,  stored  in  a  retrieval  system,  or  transmitted  in  any 
form  by  any  means — graphic,  electronic,  mechanical,  or  chemical,  including  photocopying, 
recording  or  taping,  or  information  storage  and  retrieval  systems— without  written  permission  of 
Rutgers,  The  State  University  of  New  Jersey,  New  Brunswick,  New  Jersey. 

The  original  documents  in  this  edition  are  from  the  archives  at  the  Edison  National 
Historic  Site  at  West  Orange,  New  Jersey. 


ISBN  978-0-88692-887-2 


y 


THOMAS  A.  EDISON  PAPERS  STAFF  (2007) 

Director  and  General  Editor 
Paul  Israel 

Senior  Editor 
Thomas  Jeffrey 

Associate  Editors 
Louis  Carlat 
Theresa  Collins 

Assistant  Editor 
David  Hochfelder 

Indexing  Editor 
David  Ranzan 

Consulting  Editor 
Linda  Endersby 

Visiting  Editor 
Amy  Flanders 

Editorial  Assistants 
Alexandra  Rimer 
Kelly  Enright 
Eric  Barry 

Outreach  and  Development 
(Edison  Across  the  Curriculum) 

Theresa  Collins 

Business  Manager 
Rachel  Weissenburgcr 


BOARD  OF  SPONSORS  (2007) 


Rutgers,  The  State  University  of  New  Jersey  National  Park  Service 

Richard  L.  McCormick  Maryannc  Gcrbauckas 

ZivaGalili  Michelle  Ortwcin 

Ann  Fabian 

Paul  Clemens  Smithsonian  Institution 

Harold  Wallace 

New  Jersey  Historical  Commission 
Marc  Mappen 

EDITORIAL  ADVISORY  BOARD  (2007) 


Robert  Friedel,  University  of  Maryland 
Louis  Galambos,  Johns  Hopkins  University 
Susan  Hockey,  Oxford  University 
Thomas  P.  Hughes,  University  of  Pennsylvania 
Ronald  Kline,  Cornell  University 
Robert  Rosenberg,  John  Wiley  &  Sons 
Marc  Rothenberg,  Joseph  Henry  Papers,  Smithsonian  Institution 
Philip  Scranton,  Rutgers  University/Hagley  Museum 
Merritt  Roe  Smith,  Massachusetts  Institute  of  Technology 


FINANCIAL  CONTRIBUTORS 


We  thankfully  acknowledge  the  vision  and  support  of  Rutgers  University  and  the 
Thomas  A.  Edison  Papers  Board  of  Sponsors. 

This  edition  was  made  possible  by  grant  funds  provided  from  the  New  Jersey  Historical 
Commission,  National  Historical  Publications  and  Records  Commission,  and  The  National 
Endowment  for  the  Humanities.  Major  underwriting  has  been  provided  by  the  Barkley  Fund, 
through  the  National  Trust  for  the  Humanities,  and  by  The  Charles  Edison  Foundation. 

We  are  grateful  for  the  generous  support  of  the  IEEE  Foundation,  the  Hyde  &  Watson 
Foundation,  the  Martinson  Family  Foundation,  and  the  GE  Foundation.  We  acknowledge  gifts 
from  many  other  individuals,  as  well  as  an  anonymous  donor;  the  Association  of  Edison 
Illuminating  Companies;  and  the  Edison  Electric  Institute.  For  the  assistance  of  all  these 
organizations  and  individuals,  as  well  as  for  the  indispensable  aid  of  archivists,  librarians, 
scholars,  and  collectors,  the  editors  are  most  grateful. 


A  Note  on  the  Sources 
The  pages  which  have  been 
filmed  are  the  best  copies 
available.  Every  technical 
effort  possible  has  been 
made  to  ensure  legibility. 


PUBLICATION  AND  MICROFILM 
COPYING  RESTRICTIONS 

Reel  duplication  of  the  whole  or  of 
any  part  of  this  film  is  prohibited. 
In  lieu  of  transcripts,  however, 
enlarged  photocopies  of  selected 
items  contained  on  these  reels 
may  be  made  in  order  to  facilitate 
research. 


PATENT  SERIES 
PATENT  APPLICATION  FOLIOS 


Patent  Series 

Patent  Application  Folios  (1911-1931) 

These  folios  contain  formal  patent  applications,  related  legal 
documents,  and  correspondence  between  Edison's  attorneys  and  the  U  S 
Patent  Office.  Most  of  the  folios  also  contain  additional  items  such  as  notes 
and  drawings  by  Edison;  draft  specifications  in  Edison's  hand  and  other 
specifications  with  his  notations;  patent  attorneys'  notes  and  memoranda, 
communications  between  Edison  and  his  attorneys;  and  related 
correspondence  authored  by  or  sent  to  Edison,  his  associates  and  h  s 
companies.  Typically,  the  applications  were  revised  by  Edison  s  lawyers 
several  times  over  a  period  of  years  in  response  to  the  Patent  Examiner  s 
findinqs.  Some  were  eventually  abandoned  because  they  were  ultimately 
deemed  unpatentable.  Others  were  approved  by  the  Patent  Office  but  never 
became  issued  patents  because  Edison  declined  to  pay  the  final  fees,  having 
exhausted  the  strategic  value  of  letting  the  application  "soak  for  several  years 
in  the  Patent  Office  to  keep  the  ideas  away  from  his  competitors. 


During  the  period  1911-1931  Edison  executed  113  successful  patent 
applications  relating  to  primary  and  storage  batteries,  business  and  musical 
phonographs,  disc  and  cylinder  records,  the  kinetophone  (a  Pb°n°9r®Ph  ®nd 
motion  picture  projector  combination),  cement,  and  other  subjects.  Many  of 
the  applications  pertain  to  the  Diamond  Disc  phonograph,  which  Edison 
introduced  toward  the  end  of  1912.  An  outline  of  eighteen  patents  that  he 
planned  to  pursue  in  support  of  his  new  phonograph  can  be  f°und  at  the 
beqinninq  of  Folio  906.  Other  technologies  for  which  Edison  sought  patents, 
not  always  successfully,  include  the  use  of  paraphenylenediamineas 
condensing  agent  for  shellac  (to  make  phonograph  records)  chemical 
processing  methods  for  storage  battery  components  a  d  o  O  UC  ’ 
concrete  furniture  and  other  concrete  products;  projectiles  (related  to  his 
research  forthe  U.S.  Navy  during  World  War  I);  phonograph  reproducers,  and 
automobile  electrical  systems.  Among  the  thirty-seven  patents  that  he 
received  during  the  last  decade  of  his  life  (four  others  were  issued 
posthumously)  are  two  for  rubber  processing  and  one  for  a  radio  or  telephone 

receiver  based  on  osmotic  action,  dubbed  the  osmophone  (folio  1231). 

Diqital  images  of  all  of  Edison's  .issued  patents  can  be  found  on  the 
Thomas  A.  Edison  Papers  (TAEP)  website.  In  addition,  i mage s  of  these  and 
other  inventors'  issued  patents,  along  with  a  searchable  database,  are 


available  on  the  U.S.  Patent  Office  website.  A  nearly  complete  set  of 
application  files  for  Edison’s  U.S.  patents  can  be  found  in  the  National 
Archives  (Record  Group  241,  Records  of  the  Patent  Office).  Because  the 
formal  specifications  and  Patent  Office  correspondence  in  the  case  files  at  the 
National  Archives  are  already  available  on  microfilm,  identical  material  in  the 
case  files  at  the  Edison  National  Historic  Site  has  not  been  selected.  Also  not 
selected  are  the  folios  for  the  numerous  patents  that  Edison  receded  in 
countries  other  than  the  United  States.  No  complete  list  exists,  but  the  1910 
biography,  Edison:  His  Life  and  Inventions  by  Frank  L.  Dyer  and  Thomas 
Commerford  Martin,  contains  a  compilation  of  1,239  non-U.S  patents 
awarded  in  thirty-four  countries.  This  list  is  also  available  on  the  TAtP 
website. 


For  Edison's  successful  applications,  the  selected  material  consists 
primarily  of  notes,  drawings,  and  draft  specifications  in  his  hand,  along  with 
communications  between  Edison  and  his  attorneys,  including  at  various  times 
Frank  L  Dyer,  Delos  Holden,  Henry  Lanahan,  and  William  A.  Hardy.  The  case 
files  for  Edison's  abandoned  applications  have  been  selected  in  tneir  entirety 
except  for  duplicates,  printed  patents  by  Edison  and  other  inventors,  other 
printed  material,  and  routine  memoranda  by  Edison's  attorneys.  It  should  be 
noted  that  most  of  the  folios  contain  copies  of  patents  by  other  inventors  that 
were  cited  by  the  Examiner  as  justification  for  rejecting  the  claims  in  Edison  s 
applications. 


In  addition  to  Edison’s  own  patents,  these  folios  include  applications  by 
members  of  his  laboratory  staff,  mainly  for  improvements  in  products  such  as 
the  storage  battery  and  the  phonograph.  These  applications  were  also 
handled  by  Edison's  patent  attorneys.  Documents  from  these  folders  have 
been  selected  only  where  they  show  Edison’s  personal  involvement  in  the 
inventing  or  patenting  processes.  Folios  with  selected  material  include 
applications  by  Jonas  W.  Aylsworth  (chemical  compounds  for  phonograph 
records),  Daniel  Higham  (kinetophone),  and  Miller  Reese  Hutchison  (storage 
batteries).  Several  applications  by  Thomas  A.  Edison,  Jr.,  pertaining  to 
internal  combustion  engines  have  also  been  selected,  along  with  another  for 
a  vending  machine  with  a  phonograph  inside  it. 


The  folios  are  arranged  in  chronological  order  according  to  execution 
date— the  date  on  which  the  formal  application  was  signed  and  witnessed.  For 
Edison's  successful  applications,  the  selected  documents  within  each  foho 
appear  in  chronological  order.  For  his  abandoned  applications,  the 


specifications,  Patent  Office  correspondence,  and  other  official  documents 
appear  in  the  order  they  are  listed  on  the  folio  wrapper,  followed  by  the  other 
selected  documents  in  chronological  order. 


On  the  list  that  follows,  each  selected  folio  appears  with  its  execution 
date-  folio  number;  patent  number  (for  issued  patents)  or  serial  number  (for 
abandoned  applications);  name  of  the  primary  applicant;  and  an  abbreviated 
version  of  the  patent  title  as  it  was  issued  (or,  in  the  case  of  abandoned  files, 
as  found  on  the  folio  wrapper).  Where  the  execution  date  is  not  available,  the 
date  of  filing  (which  generally  occurred  a  few  days  after  execution)  is  supplied 
in  brackets. 


It  should  be  noted  that  this  is  not  a  comprehensive  list  of  Edison's 
patents  for  the  period  1911-1 931 ,  since  folios  consisting  entirely  of  unselected 
material  do  not  appear.  A  complete  list  of  Edison's  1,093  successful  U.S. 
patents  can  be  found  on  the  TAEP  website. 

Exec.  Date  Folio#  Ser.orPat.#  Primary  Applicant  Abbreviated  Case  File  Title 


1/3/1911  681 

1/3/1911  682 

1/25/1911  688 

1/25/1911  691 

1/25/1911  692 


Ser.  600761  Edison,  Thomas  A 
Ser.  600762  Edison.  Thomas  A 
Pat.  1 034002  Edison.  Thomas  A 
Pat.  1083354  Edison,  Thomas  A 
Pat.  1 002505  Edison.  Thomas  A 


Sound  Reproducers 
Sound  Reproducers 
Storage  Battery 
Insulating  Compound 
Composition  for  Sound-Records 


2/15/1911  698 

2/15/1911  700 

3/10/1911  715 

3/22/1911  719 

3/22/1911  720 


Pat.  1 187146  Holland.  Newman  H 
Ser.  609099  Edison,  Thomas  A 
Pat.  1214883  Bliss.  Donald  M 
Pat.  1 204420  Edison.  Thomas  A 
Ser.  61 6756  Edison,  Thomas  A 


Sound-Box  for  Phonograph 
Talking  Machines  (Case  A) 
Alternating  Current  Motor 
Sound-Box 
Sound  Boxes 


3/22/1911  721 

3/28/1911  722 

3/28/1911  723 

4/3/1911  728 

4/7/1911  731 


Ser.  61 6757  Edison,  Thomas  A 
Ser.  61 7674  Edison,  Thomas  A 
Ser.  61 7675  Edison,  Thomas  A 
Pat.  1 078266  Edison,  Thomas  A 
Pat.  1 1 67484  Edison,  Thomas  A 


Phonographic  Telegraphs 
Talking  Machines  (Case  A) 
Talking  Machines  (Case  B) 
Sound-Box 

Production  of  Nickel  Hydroxld 


4/7/1911  732 

4/7/1911  733 

5/1/1911  743 

5/12/1911  745 

5/16/1911  748 


Pat.  1 083356  Edison,  Thomas  A 
Pat.  1083355  Edison,  Thomas  A 
Pat.  1050629  Edison,  Thomas  A 
Pat.  1 050630  Edison,  Thomas  A 
Pat.  1055621  Edison,  Thomas  A 


Storage  Battery 
Forming  Chemical  Compounds 
Separating  Copper  from  Other  Metals 
Separating  Copper  from  Other  Metals 
Reproducer 


6/6/1911  756 

6/8/1911  755 

6/15/1911  757 

6/19/1911  759 

7/18/1911  768 


Pat.  1 045291  Holland,  Walter  E 
Pat.  1118114  Edison.  Thomas  A 
Pat.  1 1 651 00  Holland,  Walter  E 
Pat.  1 116893  Hutchison,  Miller  R 
Ser.  639752  Edison,  Thomas  A 


Battery  Charge  Indication 
Making  Molds  for  Sound  Records 
Valve  for  Storage  Batteries 
Safety  Device  for  Secondary  Cells 
Concrete  Furniture 


t.  #  Primary  Applic 


Abbreviated  Case  File  Title 


9/26/1911  785 

10/9/1911  794 

10/16/1911  801 

11/29/1911  806 

12/12/1911  813 


1/12/1912  819 

1/19/1912  820 

1/24/1912  821 

2/15/1912  825 

2/23/1912  826 

2/28/1912  828 

3/8/1912  829 

3/8/1912  831 

4/1/1912  833 

4/23/1912  845 

4/30/1912  846 

5/20/1912  852 

5/21/1912  853 

6/14/1912  861 

6/17/1912  860 

6/19/1912  866 

7/15/1912  870 

7/15/1912  871 

7/22/1912  872 

7/27/1912  876 

8/9/1912  879 

8/21/1912  888 

10/24/1912  903 

11/7/1912  905 

11/19/1912  906 

2/28/1913  915 

2/28/1913  916 

3/27/1913  917 

4/10/1913  918 

7/22/1913  939 


r.  639716  Moore,  Sherwood  T 
1. 101 6875  Edison,  Thomas  A 
r.  642072  Edison,  Thomas  A 
r.  642377  Edison,  Thomas  A 
r.  645838  Kiefer.  Herman  E 

sr.  651697  Hutchison,  Miller  R 
it.  1204424  Gall,  Adolph  F 
sr.  655902  Edison,  Thomas  A 
st.  1 097985  Moore,  Sherwood  T 
st.  1221981  Edison,  Thomas  A 

at.  1146413  Edison,  Thomas  A 
st.  1 275232  Edison,  Thomas  A 
at.  1 0731 07  Edison,  Thomas  A 
ar.  669868  Edison.  Thomas  A 
at.  1 099349  Edison,  Thomas  A 

at.  1143818  Edison,  Thomas  A 
at.  1 1 1 1 999  Edison,  Thomas  A 
er.  674274  Edison,  Thomas  A 
at.  1190133  Edison,  Thomas  A 
er.  679744  Edison,  Thomas  A 

er.  681101  Edison,  Thomas  A 
er.  685206  Edison,  Thomas  A 
er.  685542  Edison,  Thomas  A 
;er.  687967  Higham,  Daniel 
'at.  1 1 67485  Edison,  Thomas  A 

;er.  694658  Edison,  Thomas  A 
■at.  1 1 92400  Edison,  Thomas  A 
■at.  1 1 67638  Edison,  Thomas  A 
er.  704338  Langley,  Sam  G 
at.  1 28201 1  Aylsworth,  Jonas  W 

’at.  1 266778  Edison,  Thomas  A 
Ser.  710150  Edison,  Thomas  A 
3er.  710151  Edison,  Thomas  A 
’at.  1160585  Edison,  T  A,  Jr 
’at.  1 25551 7  Edison,  Thomas  A 

’at.  1 1 84334  Edison,  Thomas  A 
3er.  71 9639  Edison,  Thomas  A 
Ser.  728370  Edison,  Thomas  A 
Ser.  730343  Edison,  Thomas  A 
Ser.  732410  Edison,  Thomas  A 

Pat.  1 286259  Edison.  Thomas  A 
Ser.  752276  Edison,  Thomas  A 
Ser.  757502  Higham,  Daniel 
Ser.  760624  Edison,  Thomas  A 
Pat.  1 1 82894  Chester.  Jerry 


Phonographs 
Electroplating  Apparatus 
Storage  Battery  Motor  Sets 
Sound  Records  and  Making  Same 
Manufacture  of  Fertilizing  Material 


Charging  Storage  Batteries 

Phonograph-Record 

Concrete  Furniture 

Means  for  Reducing  Sounds 

Coatings  for  Storage  Battery  Containers 


Record  Tablet  Molds 
Electrical  System  for  Automobiles 
Means  for  Concentrating  Ores 
Charging  Storage  Batteries 
Production  of  Sound-Records 

Making  Screens  for  Projection 
Disc  Sound  Records 
Phonograph  Recorders 
Internal  Combustion  Engines 
Starting  System  for  Automobiles 

Phonograph  or  Talking-Machine 
Phonographs  or  Talking  Machines 
Illusion  of  Scenes  in  Colors 
Coating  Phonograph  Records 
Formation  of  Sound  Records 

Means  for  Recording  Sounds 
Phonographs  or  Talking  Machines 
(Talking  Pictures] 


Alternating  Current  Rectifier 


Exec.  Date  Folio#  Ser.  or  Pat.#  Primary  Applicant 


9/3/1913  943 

11/21/1913  952 

1/28/1914  964 

1/31/1914  960 

2/3/1914  961 


965 


2/11/1914 
2/20/1914 
3/26/1914  975 

4/21/1914  981 

4/28/1914  983 

5/09/1914  985 

5/22/1914  987 

5/28/1914  988 

7/10/1914  990 

7/10/1914  991 

7/24/1914  993 

8/6/1914  997 

9/14/1914  1009 

10/9/1914  1012 

10/13/1914  1013 


8/21/1915 

1/11/1916 

1/12/1916 

2/4/1916 

2/5/1916 


Pat.  1086727  Palmer,  Harry  B 
Pat.  1 2901 38  Edison,  Thomas  A 
Ser.  81 7976  Edison,  Thomas  A 
Ser.  81 5946  Hutchison.  Miller  R 
Ser.  81 6687  Edison.  Thomas  A 

Ser.  819301  Edison,  T  A,  Jr 
Pat.  1 1 62800  Nehr,  William  F 
Pat.  1 1 30977  Hutchison,  Miller  R 
Pat.  1 201 449  Edison,  Thomas  A 
Ser.  836608  Edison,  Thomas  A 

Ser.  837706  Nehr,  William  F 
Pat.  1283779  Hutchison,  Miller  R 
Pat.  1 290254  Lewis.  Frank  D 
Pat.  1297466  Holland,  Newman  H 
Pat.  1178014  Holland.  Newman  H 


1030 

1038 

1037 

1041 

1042 


1045 

1048 

1049 
[12/1/1916]  1053 

1/16/1917  1058 

1/16/1917  1059 

8/15/1917  1081 

10/23/1918  1104 

11/15/1918  1107 

1/14/1919 


1109 


3/3/1919 

4/24/1919 

5/26/1919 

5/27/1919 

6/12/1919 

6/18/1919 

6/24/1919 

8/28/1919 

9/13/1919 

9/16/1919 


Ser.  853283 
Pat.  1299693 
Pat.  1229749 
Pat.  1326330 
Pat.  1266779 

Pat.  1342326 
Pat.  1297294 
Pat.  1323218 
Pat.  1300709 
Pat.  1300708 

Ser.  99281 
Pat.  1283706 
Ser.  123480 
Ser.  134386 
Ser.  143017 

Pat.  1266780 
Pat.  1353152 
Pat.  1425183 
Ser.  262922 
Pat.  1377192 

Pat.  1452829 
Pat.  1411425 
TM  128050 
Ser.  302556 
Pat.  1371414 

Pat.  1359972 
Pat.  1369271 
Pat.  1402751 
Pat.  1379088 
Ser.  324291 


Edison,  Thomas  A 
Edison,  Thomas  A 
Holland,  Newman  H 
Edison,  Thomas  A 
Edison,  Thomas  A 

Edison,  Thomas  A 
Edison,  Thomas  A 
Edison,  Thomas  A 
Edison,  Thomas  A 
Edison,  Thomas  A 

Edison,  Thomas  A 
Edison,  Thomas  A 
Edison,  Thomas  A 
Edison,  T  A,  Jr 
Edison,  Thomas  A 

Edison,  Thomas  A 
Dinwiddie,  William  W 
Edison,  Thomas  A 
Knierim,  William  H 
Edison,  Thomas  A 

Edison,  T  A,  Jr 
Edison,  Thomas  A 
Edison,  T  A,  Jr 
Edison,  Thomas  A 
Edison,  Thomas  A 

Edison,  Thomas  A 
Edison,  Thomas  A 
Edison,  Thomas  A 
Edison,  Thomas  A 
Edison,  Thomas  A 


Abbreviated  Case  File  Title 
Toy  Guns 

Friction-Speed  Governor 
Methods  and  Means  for  Treating  Ores 
Storage  Batteries 
Sound  Records 

Internal  Combustion  Engine 
Phonographic  Molding  Apparatus 
Safety  Device 
Sound-Modifying  Device 
Production  of  Molded  Articles 

Improvement  in  Molding  Apparatus 

Storage  Battery 

Catch 

Speaking-Tube  Support 
Phonograph 

Phonographs 
Storage  Battery 
Phonograph 

Mold  for  Sound-Records 
Electric  Safety-Lantern 

Matter  for  Sound-Records 
Projectile 

Rendition  of  Musical  Compositions 
Projectile  (Case  A) 

Projectile  (Case  B) 

Production  of  Potassium  Chloride 
Para-Phenylene-Di-Amin  Substances 
Molds 

Internal  Combustion  Engines 
Concrete  Structures 

Storage  Battery 

Production  of  Molded  Articles 

Transmitter 

Internal  Combustion  Engines 
Production  of  Molded  Articles 

Internal-Combustion  Engines 
Production  of  Molded  Articles 
Trademark  "Econometer" 

Recording  and  Reproducing  Sounds 
Nickel-Plating 

Electroplating 

Cleaning  of  Metallic  Surfaces 
Storage-Battery  Electrode 
Storage  Battery 
Production  of  Nickel 


Exec.  Date 


Folio  #  Ser.  or  Pat.  it  Primary  Applicant 


Abbreviated  Case  File  Title 


9/24/1919  1142 

9/30/1919  1143 

11/3/1919  1144 

11/28/1919  1146 

12/9/1919  1148 


Pat.  1364359 
Pat.  1379089 
Pat.  1386095 
Pat.  1410391 
Pat.  1456687 


Edison,  Thomas  A 
Edison,  Thomas  A 
Edison,  Thomas  A 
Edison,  Thomas  A 
Edison,  Thomas  A 


Protecting-Varnish  for  Electrodes 
Thin  Metallic  Sheets  or  Foils 
Galvanic  Batteries 
Protective  Coating  for  Steel  and  Iron 
Stylus  Mounting  (Case  A) 


6/14/1920  1160 

7/8/1920  1163 

8/23/1920  1164 

12/31/1920  1176 

9/26/1921  1181 


Pat.  1377194 
Pat.  1417464 
Pat.  1425184 
Pat.  1489240 
Pat.  1488480 


Edison,  Thomas  A 
Edison,  Thomas  A 
Edison,  Thomas  A 
Edison,  Thomas  A 
Edison,  Thomas  A 


Storage  Battery 

Production  of  Thin  Metal  Sheets  or  Foils 
Production  of  Thin  Metal  Sheets  or  Foils 
Voltaic  Battery  and  Electrode  Elements 
Alkaline  Storage-Battery  Elements 


11/25/1921  1183 

2/8/1922  1186 

6/23/1922  1196 

10/18/1922  1252 

5/2/1923  1204 


Ser.  518181 
Pat.  1492023 
Pat.  1678246 
Pat.  1686686 
Pat.  1495580 


Edison,  Thomas  A 
Edison.  Thomas  A 
Edison,  Thomas  A 
Edison.  T  A,  Jr 
Edison,  Thomas  A 


Electrolytically  Deposited  Surface  Coatings 
Sound  Record 

Production  of  Alkali-Metal  Compounds 
Ignition  Timer 

Producing  Chlorinated  Rubber 


5/11/1923  1205 

6/28/1923  1209 

12/7/1923  1212 

2/20/1924  1217 

2/25/1924  1218 


Pat.  1651196  Edison,  Thomas  A 
Pat.  1 600722  Edison,  Thomas  A 


Pat.  1599121  Edison,  Thomas  A 
Pat.  1 526326  Edison,  Thomas  A 


Storage  Battery 

Mounting  for  Diamonds  and  the  Like 
Roofing 

Production  of  Depolarizing  Agent 
Storage  Battery 


2/2/1925  1231 

4/28/1925  1233 

1/25/1926  1239 

2/1/1926  1241 

10/1/1926  1248 


Pat.  1702935 
Pat.  1744533 
Pat.  1744534 
Pat.  1711265 
Pat.  1690159 


Edison,  Thomas  A 
Edison,  Thomas  A 
Edison,  Thomas  A 
Edison,  Thomas  A 
Edison,  Thomas  A 


Receiving  Apparatus:  Radio  and  Telephone 
Diaphragms  of  Sound  Boxes 
Production  of  Molded  Articles 
Phonograph  Reproducer 
Producing  Sound-Record  Tablets 


11/25/1927  1268  Pat.  1740079  Edison,  Thomas  A 

1/9/1930  1333  Ser.  419780  Edison,  T  A,  Jr 


Extraction  of  Rubber  from  Plants 
Phonographs 


Patent  Series 
Patent  Application  Files 
Folio  #  681  Sound  Reproducers 

Serial  #:  600761 

Primary  Applicant:  Edison,  Thomas  A 
Date  Executed:  1 73/1 91 1 


petition 


®o  tfjc  Commissioner  of  patents!: 

gour  petitioner  A-  hdiboh 

a  citizen  of  tfjc  flUniteb  States,  reSibing  anb  fjabing  a  $oSt  Office  abbreSS  at 

Llewellyn  Park,  V/eot  Orange,  Kuo  ex  County,  >Jov;  Jersey, 


praps  tljat  letters  patent  map  be  granteb  to  ijim  for  tfje  improbements  in 
SOWED  REPRODUCERS 


Set  fortfj  in  tije  annexeb  specification;  anb  Ije  Ijerebp  appoints  Jfranfe  %.  ©per 
(Registration  i?o.  560),  of  ©range,  Jleto  ferSep,  ijis  attornep,  toitf)  fnU 
potuer  of  substitution  anb  rebocation,  to  prosecute  tijis  application,  to  tnafte 
alterations  anb  atnenbntents  tljerein,  to  receibe  tfje  patent,  anb  to  transact  all 
business  in  tije  patent  Office  connecteb  tljeretuitij. 


SPECIFICATION 

TO  ALL  WHOM  IT  MAY  CONCERN: 

BE  IT  KNOWN,  that  I,  THOMAS  A.  EDISON,  a  citizen 
of  the  United.  States  and  a  resident  of  Llewellyn  Park, 

West  Orange ,  Essex  County,  New  Jersey,  have  invented 
certain  new  and  useful  improvement#  in  SOUND  REPRODUCERS, 
of  which  the  following  is  #  description:- 

My  invention  relates  to  sound  reproducers,  par¬ 
ticularly  of  the  type  adapted  to  reproduce  from  disc 
records  having  vertically  undulating  record  grooves,  al¬ 
though  its  use  is  not  limited  to  that  typo.  The  object 
of  my  invention  is  to  construct  a  reproducer  giving  an 
improved  quality  of  reproduction,  by  the  elimination  of 
certain  foreign  or  metallic  sounds  caused  by  the  support¬ 
ing  means  and  connections  commonly  employed  between  the 
stylus  and  the  diaphragm,  and  by  causing  the  stylus  to 
track  the  record  groove  with  groat  fidelity.  Other  ob¬ 
jects  of  my  invention  will  appear  from  tho  following 
specification  and  appended  claimo. 

Tho  lever  or  am  carrying  the  stylus  and  trans¬ 
mitting  the  movements  thoreof  to  the  diaphragm  is  oommonly 
made  of  motal,  and  therefore  may  produce  a  characteristic 
"ring"  or  metallic  sound  when  sot  into  vibration  by  the 
movements  of  the  stylus.  I  form  this  part  of  a  material 
and  in  proportions  eo  chosen  that  it  will  produce  no 


(1) 


audme  Bound  when  the  stylus  lo  vibrated,  the  lever 
being  preferably  of  wood.  I  also  prefer  to  form  the 
stylus-cariylng  arm  betv/een  its  pivot  and  the  stylus  with 
a  portion  stiffly  resilient  in  a  direction  parallel  to  the 
movement  of  the  stylus  in  tracking  the  record.  V/lth  a 
vertically  undulating  record  groove  this  construction  has 
the  effect  of  resisting  movoment  of  the  stylus  away  from 
the  record  surface,  whioh  the  momentum  of  the  moving  parts 
tends  to  produce  in  cases  of  vibrations  of  wide  amplitude. 
In  my  construction  the  portion  of  the  lever  carrying  the 
stylus  and  situated  boyond  the  spring  portion  is  of  small 
mss  and  inertia,  and  upward  movement  of  the  stylus  stress¬ 
es  the  spring  portion  of  the  lever,  which  tend3  to  hold 
the  stylus  always  in  contact  with  the  record  surface, 
while  at  the  same  time  the  spring  portion  of  the  lever  is 
sufficiently  stiff  to  transmit  to  the  diaphragm  all  the 
vibrations  of  the  lever  duo  to  the  recorded  sounds. 

In  order  that  a  clearer  understanding  of  my 
invention  may  he  had,  attention  is  hereby  directed  to  the 
accompanying  drawings,  forming  part  of  this  specification, 
and  illustrating  the  preferred  form  of  my  invention.  In 
the  drawing  - 

Figure  1  represents  a  central  vortical  section 
through  a  sound  reproducer  embodying  my  invention;  and 

Figure  2  represents  an  end  elevation  of  tho  same 
looking  from  the  left  in  Figure  1. 

Referring  to  the  drawings,  the  sound  box  1  is 
formed  in  any  suitable  manner  as  by  the  annular  member 
2  and  the  flanged  member  3,  provided  with  the  neck  4,  the 


(2) 


threaded  ring  £  being  screwed  Into  the  annulus  2  to  posi¬ 
tion  and  hold  the  members  as  shown.  The  diaphragm  6  Is 
preferably  secured  between  an  annular  rubber  gaslcet  7  of 
circular  cross  section  and  a  ring  8  preferably  of  steel, 
formed  with  a  knife  edge  as  shown,  which  is  positioned  to 
contact  the  edge  of  the  diaphragm  in  a  circular  line 
opposite  the  center  of  the  circular  rubber  gasket  7. 

A  copper  washer  £  may  be  interposed  between  the  knife 
edge  support  8  and  the  flange  of  member  3  as  shown. 

The  stylus  10  i0  mounted  in  a  suitable  holder 
11  carried  by  /the  end  of  lever  12  pivotally  supported  at 
Ij.  This  lever  or  arm  Is  formed  of  a  material  such  that 

I  it  will  produce  no  audible  sound  when  the  stylus  is  vi¬ 
brated,  the  lever  preferably  being  made  of  well  seasoned 
wood,  the  grain  of  which  should  preferably  run  in  a  diagon¬ 
al  direction,  that  is,  preferably  at  an  angle  of  approxi¬ 
mately  45  degrees  to  the  bottom  surface  14  of  the  lever 
as  shown.  The  upper  end  of  the  lever  is  secured  to  the 
center  of  the  diaphragm  in  any  suitable  manner,  as  by  the 
small  bolt  and  nut  1£,  l6,  and  a  suitable  adhesive,  as 
shellac.  The  lever  is  preferably  pivoted  to  the  ring  2 
of  the  sound  box  by  means  of  the  small  fixed  pin  13  carried 
by  a  bracket  1£,  which  is  either  Beoured  to  the  ring  2  by 
screws  18,  as  shown,  or  may  be  formed  integral  with  the 
ring  2.  The  endB  of  pin  1£  are  mounted  in  lugs  1£  car¬ 
ried  by  bracket  1£.  Lever  12  is  provided  with  a  suitable 
opening  therethrough  in  which  is  driven  a  small  sleeve  20 
j  which  furnishes  a  bearing  for  the  lever  when  the  same  is 
mounted  with  pivot  pin  1£  extending  through  the  sleeve  20. 


(3) 


\ 


Lever  12  i°  provided  with  Losses  21  on  each  side  of  the 
sane,  sleeve  20  extending  only  through  those  Losses. 

Lever  12  is  preferaLly  concaved  or  reduced  in  seotlon  as 
shown  at  22^  between  pivot  15  and  the  stylus  support  11 
in  order  to  make  the  lever  stiffly  resilient  in  the  di¬ 
rection  of  movement  of  the  stylus  10,  that  is,  at  right 
angles  to  the  record  surfaoe. 

By  making  the  lever  of  wood  the  obj  ootionaLle 
"ring”  or  metallic  sound  produced  by  a  metallic  lever  or 
stylus  arm  in  operation  is  eliminated,  my  improved  stylus 
arm  giving  no  audible  sound  of  its  own  during  the  operation 
of  the  reproducer.  Also,  by  providing  the  levor  with  the 
spring  portion  shown  at  22,  the  stylus  is  oaused  to  track 

I  the  record  groove  with  greater  fidelity,  and  the  quality 
of  the  sound  reproduced  is  improved.  In  devices  of  this 
character  commonly  used,  the  momentum  of  the  moving  parts 
is  often  sufficient  to  cause  the  stylus  to  jump  entirely 
clear  of  the  record  surface  when  a  portion  of  the  Bound 
record  representing  a  rarefaction  of  considerable  ampli¬ 
tude  is  being  reproduced.  With  my  invention,  tho  spring 
portion  of  the  lever  is  put  under  a  certain  amount  of 
stress  when  the  stylus  travels  up  tho  slope  of  a  rising 
portion  of  tho  record  groove,  thus  tending  to  hold  the 
stylus  in  contact  with  the  record  surface  and  prevent  the 
same  from  jumping  therefrom,  the  portion  of  the  levor  be¬ 
tween  the  end  of  the  same  and  the  ooncavod  portion  22  being 
of  small  masB  and  having  small  inertia.  While  the  lever 
bends  somev/hat  in  reproduction  at  its  moot  resilient  por¬ 
tion  as  stated,  nevertheless,  the  lever  is  caused  to  rock 
upon  it 8  pivot  by  the  movements  of  the  stylus  in  tracking 
the  record  groove,  and  the  reproducing  movements  of  the 


(4) 


Btylus  are  transmitted  to  the  diaphragm. 

K.,l„s  no*  desorlbod  m  invention.  «».t  I  »l*“ 
and  doalr.  to pnotoct  *» *  “ a”  f“uom,:' 

In  a 'eound^reprodooer t  tho  *ltl>  * 

v  . — “  «?***  ott;rr 

lever  Plvot\d  to  ..id-nd  *-  -  ‘ °  °* 

aiephOT,  Id  a  etyl»»  “"led  thoroW,  »»  »  » 

as  described 

\  sound  reproducer,  the  combination  with  a 

diaphragm  and\  stylus,  of  means  for  supporting  said 

6tylus  and  transmitting  the  movements  thereof  to  said 

\  r1  entirely  of  wood  j  substantially  as 
diaphragm,  composed,  entire  y 

described. 

,  In  .  so\nd  roproauoor,  the  oo.Mna.lon  »ltt 

»a .  »W=. «  -»»  f»r  •“pportl“e  “l4 

stylus  odd  W  «»  *' 

diupHuae.,  .o  shapeVand  op  ooC  .at.ria  »  *°  « *  «' 
resonant  ultMn  *Ul 

as  described 

4  m  .  sound  \eprodnoor,  tie  oo.fin.tlon  «ltn  < 

diaphragm  and  a  =«1»\  <*  -«»  “14 

stylus  and  transmitting  the  ‘»«™of  -old 

diaphragm,  oo.po.sd'  on^rsW  -  — — “‘8"lia’ 
substantially  as  described. 

in  a  sound  raplduosr,  the  oomhlnatlon  .ltl.  » 
diaphragm  op  a  Pivot.d  ls\ar  oonn.ot.d  to  said  dlapfr.s. 


and  a  styluB 


irried  thoreW,  said  lever  being 


>  .shaped 


(5) 


anil  of  matorial  Q°  chosen  aa,,to'"be  incapable  of  vibrating 
so  ao  to  five  forth  .an’ audible  sound,  substantially  as 
described. 

\  •  jn  a  sound  reproducer,  the  combination  with  a 

diaphragm  of  a  pivoted  lever  connected  to  oaid  diaphragm 
and  a  stylus  carried  thereby,  said  lever  being  formed 
with  a'^porlflon  between  said  stylus  and  the  pivot  of  the 
lover  stiffly  reuiliont  in  a  direction  parallel  to  the 
reproducing  movement  of  said  stylus,  substantially  as 
described. 

t.,,.,  '-hjvy 

7,  In  a  dound  reproducer,  the  combination  with  a 
diaphragm  and  a  stylus  of  a  pivoted  lever  oarrying  said 
stylus  and  Joined  Vo  said.- diaphragm  and  so  formed  in  the 
portion  thereof  between  its  pivot  and  said  stylus  as  to 
resist  exoessive  movement  of  said  stylus  from  the  surface 
of  a  record  being  reproduced  thereby,  substantially  as 
described. 

''  jn  a  sound  reproducer,  the  combination  with  a 

sound  box  and  a  diaphragm  positioned  therein,  of  a  lever 
pivoted  to  said  sound  box,  and  joined  at  one  end  to  said 
diaphragm,  and  a  stylus  carried  by  the  other  end  of  said 
lever  and  mounted  in  position  to  track  a  vertically 
undulating  record  groove,  the  arm  of  said  lever  extending 
from  tho  pivot  thereof  to  said  stylus  being  formed  with 
a^orl Jon  stiffly  resilient  in  a  direction  parallel  to 
movement  of  said  stylus  in  tracking  said  vertioal  un¬ 
dulations,  substantially  as  described. 

1 v>  '  '*/'***' 


the 


(6) 


®f)i£i  Specification  Signeb  anti  toitneSSeb  tfjis,?^  imp  o$i*~~ 

.-r^' .  &&s-&cntu. . . . 


©atb. 


State  of  J?cto  ferSep 
Count?  of  CSSex 


thohas  a.  ■EDISON  ,  tije  abobe  namcb 
petitioner,  being  bulp  stoorn,  bepoSeS  anb  saps  tijat  fje  is  a  citizen  of  tfje  Uniteb 
States,  anb  a  resibent  of  Llewellyn  Park,  West  Orange,  Essex  County, 
New  Jersey 


tijat  fje  berilp  heliebeS  ijimself  to  be  tije  original,  first  anb  Sole  inbentor  of  the 
improbements  in 

SOUND  REPRODUCERS 


bestribeb  anb  claimeb  in  tije  annexeb  Specification;  tijat  fje  boes  not  imoto  anb 
boes  not  beliebe  tfjat  tfje  Same  toaS  eber  bnohm  or  uSeb  before  ijis  inbention  or 
biscoberp  thereof;  or  patenteb  or  beScribeb  in  anp  printeb  publication  in  tije 
KUniteb  states  of  America  or  anp  foreign  countrp  before  fjis  inbention  or 
biscoberp  tfjereof,  or  more  tfjan  ttoo  pears  prior  to  tijis  application;  or  patenteb 
in  anp  countrp  foreign  to  tije  Uniteb  States  on  an  application  fileb  more  tijan 
ttoelbe  months  prior  to  tijis  application ;  or  in  public  use  or  on  sale  in  tije 
tiniteb  States  for  more  tijan  ttoo  pears  prior  to  this  application;  anb  that  no 
application  for  patent  upon  Saib  inbention  has  been  fileb  bp  him  or  fjis  legal 
representatibes  or  assigns  in  anp  foreign  countrp. 

- 

Stoorn  to  anb  subscribeb  before  me  tijis bap \$Q>/ 

(/<?,  _ 

i&otarp  public. 


[Seall 


J*  *  '  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 

UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 

WASHINGTON  Bebruary  6,1911* 

Thomas  A,  Ml  son, 

Care  prank  L.  Lyer, 

Orange,  Hew  Jersey  .  j  !-  h.i-'  s  v ; i  I 

Edison  Laboratory  .  j  h«  !\  :  .  ..j 

Please  find  below  a  communication  from  the  EXAMINER  in  charge  of  your  application. 

for  Sound  Reproducers  .filed  .Tan.  4 , 1 911 ,  Beri  al  number  600,761  . 


This  application  has  been  duly  examined. 

15  in  not  connected  on  tbe  drawing. 

The  expressions,  means  composed  entirely  of  v/ood,  and 
meanfi  composed  entirely  of  mom-metallic  material,  in  claims  2  and 
4  respectively,  are  objectionable  as  not  accurate.  The  supporting 
means  include  the  entire  sound  box  and  the  entire  sound  box  is  not 

of  V70  0d« 

Claims  1,  2  and  4  are  rejected  as  not  patentable  over 
McMahon,  Juno  30,1891,#454°947,  (101-10).  It  being  old  as 
here  shown  to  make  the  reproducing  bar  of  wood,  no  invention  can 
be  aeon  in  alone  making  the  common  type  of  stylus  bar  of  wood. 

Claim  3  is  rejected  on  McMahon  cited,  see  also  Figure  6  in 
which  the  stylus  bar  is  believed  to  be  non-reBonant. 

Claim  6  is  rejected  upon  the  cited  art*  It  is  believed 
that  applicant's  Btyius  bur  v/ill  not  perform  the.funotion  as 
broadly  as  claimed  in  this  claim.  Accordingly  the  claim  is  also 
rejected  as  covering  a  devioe  inoperative  to  do  that  which  is 
ol aimed. 

Claims  6  and  8  nro  reacted  as  not  patentaKLy  difltin- 
guinli&nfc  from  Mac  don  old,  July  25,1905,  $795,293,  (18X^10)  •  Any 


stylus  -bar  in  which  there  is  a  out  away  portion  :.-V 

■fi'ir'  ‘  ,.i  between  the  pivotal  pointj^the  stylus  hearing  point  will  he 

stiffly  resilient  at  that  particular  point. 

Claim  7  is  rejected  upon  the  cited  art  and  1b  also 
rejected  as  not  distinguishing  from  almost  any  stylus  her  of  the 
general  type  disclosed  hy  applicant  as  Frenoh  patent  to  Danzer, 
#304. 54ft. April  11,1908^(181-10).  The  Danzer  patent  ■;  (prevents 
excessive  movement  of  the  stjrlus  from  the  surface  of  the  record. 


This  action  1b  supplementary  to  the  office  notion  of 
February  8,1911  . 

All  of  the  clnima  uro  additionally  rejected  upon  the 
discloaure  by^W.  B«  Stout  in  the  Scientific  American  of  ' 

April  27,1901  in  an  article  entitled  "  Hot/  to  nuke  a  Gramophone", 
whorein  the  stylus  bar  is  made  ontirely  of  v/o 


IN  TIE  UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE. 


||  THOMAS  A.  EDISON,  ) 

||  SOUND  REPRODUCERS ,  ) 

,1  Room  No.  379 

Filed  January  3,  1911) 

j|  Serial  Ho.  600,761.  ) 

HONORABLE  COMMISSIONER  OF  PATENTS, 

SIR: 

In  response  to  Office  action  of  December  1, 
1911,  please  amend  the  above  entitled  case  as  follows: 

Cancel  claims  1,  2,  3,  4,  5  and  7  and  change 
the  numerals  of  claims  6  and  8  to  1  and  2  respectively. 

In  lino  4,  claim  1  (former  claim  6)  after  "a" 

I  insert  -  spring  -  . 

In  line  8,  claim  2  (former  claim  8)  after 
|  "a"  first  occurrence,  insert  -  spring  -  . 

Add  the  following  claims: 

13,  In  a  sound  reproducer,  the  combination  with  a 
diaphragm,  of  a  pivoted  lever  connected  to  said  diaphragm 
and  a  stylus  carried  thoreby,  said  lever  being  formed  with 
a  yielding  portion  stiffly  resilient  in  a  direction  parallel 
to  the  reproducing  movement  of  said  Btylus,  substantially 
as  described. 

4.  In  a  sound  reproducer,  the  combination  with  a 
diaphragm,  of  a  pivoted  wooden  lever  connected  to  said 
diaphragm  and  a  stylus  carried  thereby,  said  lover  being 
formed  with  a  yielding  portion  stiffly  resilient  in  a 
direction  parallel  to  the  reproducing  movement  of  said 


!  stylus,  substantially  as  described. 

5.  In  a  sound  reproducer,  the  combination  with  ft 
jj  diaphragm,  of  a  pivoted  lever  connected  to  said  diaphragm 
and  a  stylus  oarriea  thereby,  said  lever  being  formed  with 
Ija  portion  of  reduced  cross  section  to  render  the  same 
yielding  and  stiffly  resilient  in  a  direction  parallel  to 
lithe  reproducing  movement  of  said  stylus,  substantially  as 
I  described. 

|  6.  In  a  sound  reproducer,  the  combination  with  a 

jj  diaphragm,  of  a  pivoted  wooden  lever  connected  to  said  dia- 
jiphragm  and  a  stylus  carried  thereby,  said  lever  being  formed 
jj  with  a  portion  of  reduced  cross  section  to  render  the  same 
jj  yielding  and  stiffly  resilient  in  a  direction  parallel  to 
i|  the  reproducing  movement  of  said  stylus,  substantially  as 

Jj  described. 


remarks 

The  Examiner  is  respectfully  requested  to  connect 
the  reference  numeral  15  in  Rig.  1  of  the  drawings  with 
the  bolt  coacting  with  the  nut  16  to  secure  the  upper  ond 
of  the  stylus  lever  to  the  diaphragm- 

Hone  of  the  references  of  record  discloses  a 
sound  reproducer  having  a  diaphragm  and  a  stylus  lever 
connected  to  said  diaphragm  and  formed  with  a  yielding 
portion  stiffly  resilient  in  a  direction  parallel  to  the 
reproducing  movement  of  the  stylus.  In  the  patent 
Macdonald  of  record,  there  is  no  reference  to  the  construct 
I  ion  of  the  stylus  lever  of  a  yielding  material  nor  any 


reference  to  tho  necessary  form,  proportions  and  dimensions 
of  the  stylus  lover  to  render  the  same  yielding  and  stiffly 
resilient.  Evidently,  tho  mere  provision  of  a  "cut-away 
portion" ,  as  suggested  by  tho  Examiner,  without  tho  use  of 
proper  material  and  proper  dimensions  would  not  produce  a 
stylus  lever  having  tho  qualities  specified  above.  Stout 
and  Danzer  also  do  not  disclose  the  yielding  and  stiffly 
resilient  features  of  applicant's  Btylus  lever-  McMahon's 
device  is  of  an  entirely  different  character  from  appli¬ 
cant's  device  and  is  thought  to  have  no  bearing  on  the 
invention  as  now  claimed.  In  none  of  the  references  of 
record  is  there  any  contemplation  or  appreciation  of  the 
structure  claimed,  nor  of  the  advantages  or  improved 
results  derived  therefrom;  and  the  claims  are  accordingly 
thought  to  be  patentable. 

Reconsideration  and  allowance  are  respectfully 


requested . 


Orange,  Hew  Jersey, 
February  1912. 


Respectfully  siibmitted, 
THOMAS  A.  ED  I  SOI! 


379 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 

UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 

WASHINGTON  liar oh  4,1912. 


Frank  Dyor, 

Grunge,  New  Jersey  . 


0.  S.  PATENT  OFFICE, 

MAR  4  1912 

MAILED, 


M  find  below  a,  communication  from  the  EXAMINER  in  charge  of  your  application. 

for  Sound  reproducers,  filed  .Tan.  4, 1911, aerial  number  400,761  . 


Thin  action  is  responsive  to  the  amendment  filed  Fob.  3,1912. 

Claims  1  and  2  are  rejected  upon  French  patent  to  Gwozdz,- 
Ootobor  1,1909,  #406,  V<W, (131-11) .  It  is  believed  that  the  reduoed 
section  below  the  bearing-  points  will  render  tho  stylus  bar  stiffly 
resilient  at  that  point  although  it  may  not  bo  so  described. 

In  other  words,  it  is  believed  that  tho  cited  structure  will 
perform  the  function  claimed  by  applicant  . 

Claims  3  and  5  are  rejected  upon  Vullquet.June^/t.igO?, 
#855^736, (101-11) , see  17;  Martin, Tioo.  8,^908, #905, 899,  (101-11), 
seo  36,  or  Gleason, Aug.  11, ,1908, #896,^06, (101-11) , see  especially 
48.  As  to  llartin  or  Valiquet,  no  invention  is  found  in  substi¬ 
tuting  a  pivotal  mounting  for  the  mounting  disclosed  as  a 
pivotal  mounting  for  the  stylus  bar  is  one  of  the  most  common 
expedients  in  tho  art.  ■  • 

Claims  4  and  6  are  rejootod  upon  the  art  olted  againnt  claims 
5  and  5,  in  view  of  the  disclosure  by  Stout  in  tho  Scientific 
Amoricun  of  record.  Invention  is  not  found  in  muking  the  cited 
stylus  bars  of  material  shown  to  bo  old  . 


January  29,  1913 


MeBsrs.  Bacon  &  Milana, 

908  G  Street, 

Washington,  D.  C. 

Gentlemen: 

Please  secure  for  me  as  soon  as  possible,  prints 
of  the  drawings  in  French  patent  to  Gwozdz,  October  1,  1909, 
No.  406,700,  and  charge  the  cost  of  same  to  Thomas  A.  Edison, 
Incorporated,  A.  (Folio  681) 

Very  truly  yours. 


MJK 


General  Counsel 


Bacon  &  Milans 
(Cmtttat'UorjB  at  ffiarn 

SOLICITORS  IN  PATENT  AND  TBADE-MAKK  CAUSES 
WASHINGTON,  D.  C. 


February  1,  1913. 


Delos  Holden,  Esq. , 

Orange  ,  H.  J. 

Dear  Sir:- 

In  keeing  with  the  request  contained  in 
your  favor  of  the  29th  ult.  ,  we  are  endo  sing  herewith 
print,  s  of  French  patent  to  Gwozdz  Ho.  406,700. 

K. 


Very  truly  your 


WILL  B.  STOUT 
SCIENTIFIC  AMERICAN 
Apr.  E7 ,  1901. 

"The  sound  reproducing  part  consists  principally  of  the 
"aoimding  box"  and  its  lever  and  the  horn.  The  box  may  be 
an  old  wooden  pill  box  or  may  be  cut  from  inch  pine.  It 
should  be  circular  about  an  inch  and  a  half  in  diameter, 
inside  measurement,  and  an  inch  deep.  If  cut  of  inch  pine 
the  central  hole  will  be  cut  clear  through  the  piece  and  a 
euarter  inch  baching,  or  bottom  of  the  horn  glued  on  a  three 
quarter  inch  hole  is  drilled  in  one  side  of  the  box  to  re¬ 
ceive  the  horn.  To  the  f ront . of  the  box  is  glued  a  thin 
diaphragm  of  isinglass,  outside  of  which  is  glued  a  paper 
ring,  or  washer,  as  large  as  the  rim  of  the  box.  The  writer 
used  one  machine  for  a  while,  which  had  a  tight  paper  dia¬ 
phragm;  but  the  isinglass  is  better.  The  box  is  shown  in 
section  in  Fig.  2.  The  lever  (Fig.  3)  is  cut  out  of  hard 
■wood  in  the  shape  shown;  the  distance'  from  the  wire  axle,  wi, 
to  the  centre  of  the  part.p,  being  the  radius  of  the  box 
outside.  The  other  end  of  the.  lover  is  a  trifle  shorter 
than  the  inner  end,  and  'holds  at  its  end.  the  needle,  n,  in  a 
small  awl  hole.  This  needle  is  hold -in  place  by  a  small  screw 
So,  so  that  its  projection  from  the  wood  may  be  adjusted  till 
the  clearest  effect  is  .produced.  The  lever  is  mounted  in  a 
crotch,  Cr,  cut  also  from  hard  wood,  the  axle,  wi,' being  a 
wire-  The  crotch  part  is  glued  on  to  the  side  of  the  box 
at  an  angle  of  about  120  degrees  with  the  hole  already  o*t  to 


receive  the  horn,  the  part  p,  of  the  lever,  being  fastened 
to  the  centre  of  the  mica  or  isinglass  diaphragm  with  glue 
or  sealing  wax."  *  *  *  *  *  * 

"while  not  up  to  the  machine  made  product ,  yet  it  is  not  far 
behind,  and  for  the  satisfaction  of  the  maker  for  the  time 
spent  in  its  manufacture,  it  'can't  be  beat' 


Patent  Series 
Patent  Application  Files 

Folio  #  682  Sound  Reproducers 

Serial  #:  600762 

Primary  Applicant:  Edison,  Thomas  A 


Date  Executed: 


1/3/1911 


Folio  No . 68*3 ,  Serial  No 

l  Applicant.  Address. 

.7^7-^  A  ■  . 


Title . . 


'ilejj^sv 


Examiner’s  Room  No... 


Assignee 
Ass’g’t  Exec. 


t-lj/l. .  l(i 


(:  U'H' 

i-r^  -  -7, 

. 1  i . ■  yw 

•  / 


,  Ol 


8 


0  H 

.  24 . 

. 2(5 . - . 

.  .  20 . 

. 27 . 

\#v  : 

.  28 . 

%> 

. 29 . - . 

ig: . 

. 30 . 

FRANK  L.  DYER, 

Counsel, 

Orange,  New  Jersey. 


petition 


®o  tlje  Commissioner  o!  patents: 

gout  petitioner  tkoieas  a.  Edison 
a  citizen  ot  tlje  Uuiteb  States,  resibing  anb  Ijabing  a  Post  ©ffice  abbreSS  at 

Llewellyn  Park,  West  Orange,  Ena  ox  County,  Nov/  Jorney 


praps  tljat  letters  patent  map  be  granteb  to  Ijim  for  tfje  iinprobements  in 


SOTtND  REPROrHTCJSRS 


Set  fortfj  in  tije  annexeb  specification;  anb  ije  ijerebp  appoints  Jfranfe  TL.  33per 
(Registration  J2o.  560),  of  ©range,  iJeto  fersep,  ijis  attornep,  tuitlj  fall 
potoer  of  substitution  anb  rebocation,  to  prosecute  tfjis  application,  to  mafee 
alterations  anb  amenbments  tfjerein,  to  receibe  tlje  patent,  anb  to  transact  all 
business  in  tlje  Patent  ©ffice  connccteb  tljerehiitfj. 


SPECIFICATION 


TO  ALL  WHOM  IT  KAY  COIICERW: 

BE  IT  KNOY/N,  that  I,  TH013AS  A.  EDISON,  a  oitlzen 
of  tho  United  StatoB  and  a  resident  of  Llewellyn  Park, 

West  Orange,  Essex  County,  Hew  Jersey,  have  invented 
certain  new  and  useful  improvements  in  SOUHD  REPRODUCERS, 
of  which  the  following  is  a  description:- 

Ky  invention  relates  to  sound  reproducers  and 
my  object  is  to  provide  means  for  eliminating  to  a  con¬ 
siderable  extent  the  harsh  and  foreign  noises  which  are 
usually  hoard  during  the  reproduction  by  such  devices  from 
a  record.  In  the  operation  of  the  reproducer,  vibrations 
of  the  air  are  sot  in  motion  by  the  movement  of  the  front 
of  the  diaphragm  as  well  as  by  the  movement  of  the  rear 
of  the  diaphragm  which  is  connected  to  the  horn  or  sound 
amplifier.  The  front  of  the  diaphragm  or  that  side  to 
which  the  stylus  is  connected  is  usually  open  to  the  air 
and  the  sounds  given  off  thereby  should  be  stopped  or  pre¬ 
vented  from  passing  through  the  air  to  the  ear  of  the 
listener.  I  have  determined  that  foreign  and  objection¬ 
able  noiseB  are  made  by  the  movement  of  the  stylus  lever 
upon  its  pivot  and  commonly  by  the  vibration  of  the  mov¬ 
ing  parts  themselves.  Accordingly,  in  my  invention  I 
provide  means  for  enclosing  the  front  of  tho  diaphragm, 
and  also  preferably  the  pivot  and  the  greater  part  of  the 


(1) 


I  stylus  am  or  lever  within  a  suitable  cioeure  or  muffler, 
which  prevents  the  Bounds  referred  to  from  setting  up 
vibrations  in  the  atmosphere.  I  preferably  enclose  the 
whole  sound  box  in  a  metallic  container  of  neat  appear¬ 
ance,  the  stylus  and  a  portion  of  its  support  extending 
through  a  small  opening  in  the  same.  The  container 
should  be  of  a  fora  and  material  so  chosen  as  not  itself 
to  be  capable  of  being  set  in  vibration  of  a  character 
to  produce  audible  sounds.  The  objeots  of  my  invention 
j!  in  accordance  with  the  foregoing  statement  are  more  fully 
|  disclosed  in  the  following  specification  and  appended 
jj  claims. 

!  In  order  that  my  invention  may  be  more  clearly 

||  understood,  attention  is  hereby  directed  to  the  accompany- 
|  ing  drawing,  forming  part  of  this  specification,  and  il- 
j|  lustrating  a  preferred  embodiment  of  my  Invention.  In 
the  drawings ,  Figure  1  represents  a  central  vertical 
I  section  through  a  sound  reproducer  provided  with  my  in- 
invention,  certain  parts  being  shown  in  side  elevation;  and 

1  Figure  2  represents  a  section  on  line  2-2  of  Figure  1, 
looking  to  the  right. 

The  sound  box  1  is  provided  with  the  usual 
diaphragm,  to  which  vibrations  are  Imparted  by  the  stylus 
2  carried  by  lever  £  pivoted  aB  shown  at  4  to  the  sound 
box  1,  the  upper  end  of  lever  J.  being  connected  or  fastened 

I  to  the  diaphragm  in  any  usual  or  desired  manner.  The 
closure  5.  is  preferably  of  brass  and  approximately  spheri¬ 
cal  in  form,  enclosing  the  sound  box  1,  the  upper  arm  of 
lever  and  the  pivot  4  thereof,  the  lower  arm  of  the 


(2) 


lever  extending  downwardly  through  opening  6  adjacent  the 
lower  portion  of  the  oontlnor  £.  The  oloaure  Jg,  may 
conveniently  ho  made  in  two  parts,  the  approximately 
honi- spherical  portion  £  which  is  integral  with  a  short 
tube  8  adapted  to  ho  slipped  over  thencck  of  the  repro¬ 
ducer  at)  shown,  and  the  homi- spherical  portion  £  adapted 
to  ho  joined  to  the  portion  £  to  form  the  complete  closure. 
The  connection  may  he  made  between  the  two  parts  by  hand¬ 
ing  the  adjacent  edges  of  the  portions,  as  shown  at  10, 
to  form  a  spring  fastening  meanB.  The  parts  may  he 
located  with  renpoot  to  each  other  hy  means  of  a  pin  9' 
oeo\>rod  to  manlier  £  and  inserted  in  a  slot  in  member  7 
v/hon  the  parts  are  brought  together.  By  forming  the 
cloouro  as  a  continuous  sphere  or  continuously  arched 
member,  vibrations  of  the  same,  such  aB  might  he  produced 
hy  a  metallic  cylindrical  closure  having  a  plane  surface 
parallel  to  the  diaphragm  are  prevented.  Vibration  of 
the  closure  would  similarly  he  prevented  if  only  the  front 
portion  £  of  the  closure  were  used,  the  edges  of  the  same 
being  secured  firmly  to  the  sound  box  £.  I  prefer, 
however,  to  use  the  form  of  closure  illustrated,  in  which 
the  sound  box  is  entirely  surrounded,  and  all  sounds  ex¬ 
cept  those  produced  by  the  diaphragm  and  transmitted  there¬ 
from  through  the  neck  11  to  the  amplifying  horn,  muffled 
or  eliminated.  The  sound  box  connection  may  be  provided 
with  the  universal  joint  shown  at  12  if  desired,  excessive 
movement  of  the  reproducer  in  both  a  vertical  plane  and 
in  a  direction  transvorso  to  the  record  grooves  boing 
prevented  by  the  coaction  of  pin  13  secured  to  portion 


(3) 


L  of  do  our  o  £  with  stirrup  14  owned  ^  a  member  Ig. 
Becured  to  the  horn  concoction  X6,  “tirrup  14  pref  waW 
Dsina  formed  nth  a  triangular  op mine  therethrough  ao 

I  shown. 

HavinG  now  described  my  invention,  what  I  claim 
j!  and  desire  to  protect  by  letters  Patent  is  as  follows:- 

I  1<  ln  a  sound  reproducer,  the  combination  with  a 

jl  sound  box,  a  dlapW  carried  thereby,  a  lever  pivoted 
to  said  sound  box  and  connected  to  said  diaphragm,  and  a 
stylus  carried  by  said  lever,  of  a  substantially  non- 
sound-transmitting  closure  mounted  to  cover  the  front  side 
of  said  diaphragm  and  a  portion  of  said  lever  including 
j  the  pivot  thcroof ,  substantially  as  described. 

1  jig  ‘ in L&  sound  reproducer,  the  combination  with  a 
j  diaplAgm,  stylus,  and  lever  connecting  the  stylus  to  the 
diaphraW,  of  a  metallic  closure  mounted  to  cover  the 
side  of W  diaphragm  to  which  said  stylus  is  connected 
and  prevent  the  escape  of  sound  vibrations  therefrom, 

||  said  closure  being  of  such  a  form  as  to  be  substantially 
!  incapable  oVbclng  set  Into  vibrations  corresponding  to 
|  audible  bounds,  substantially  as  described. 

\  sound  reproducer,  the  combination  with  a 
!  diaphragm,  styles,  and  lever  connecting  the  stylus  to  the 

diaphragm,  of  a  Substantially  non-sound-transmitting 
closure  in  the  for\of  a  continuous  arch,  the  ends  of 
which  are  secured,  Runted  to  cover  the  side  of  said 
diaphragm  to  which  said  stylus  is  connected  and  prevent 


(4) 


the  escape  of  sound  vibrations  therefrom,  substantially 
as  described. 

In  a  sound  reproducer,  the  combination  with  a 
sound  box,  a  diaphragm  carried  thereby,  a  lever  pivoted 
to  said  sound  box  and  connected  to  uaid  diaphragm,  end 


a  stylus  carried  by  said  levor,  of  a  closure  in  the 
form  of  a  continuous  closed  arch. entirely  enclosing  said 
sound  box,/  the  horn  connection  of  said  sound  box  and  said 
stylus  extending  out.  through  said  closure,  substantially 
as  described.  t  / 

¥j«- 


®bis  specification  Signeb  anb  toitneSSeb  tfjis  3  d  bap  of 


©atb. 


g>tate  of  J*eb)  Jersep  ) 

Countp  of  (Essex  ) 

thomas  a.  kdison  ,  tfjE  abobe  nameb 
petitioner,  being  bulp  Stoorn,  bepoSeS  anb  SapS  tfjat  fje  is  a  citizen  of  the  fSniteb 

**  *  «,  ,..t  Or„B.,  *».  County, 


New  Jersey 

tijat  be  berilp  beliebes  himself  to  be  tije  original,  first  anb  Sole  inbentor  of  tfje 
improbements  in 

SOUND  RKPHODUCEHS . 

beScribeb  anb  claimeb  in  tfje  annexeb  specification;  tfjat  be  boeS  not  Imoto  anb 
boeS  not  beliebe  tijat  tfje  same  tuaS  eber  fmohm  or  useb  before  fjisi  inbention  or 
biscoberp  thereof;  or  patenteb  or  beScribeb  in  anp  printeb  publication  in  the 
fSfniteb  States  of  America  or  anp  foreign  countrp  before  bis  inbention  or 
biscoberp  thereof,  or  more  than  ttoo  pears  prior  to  this  application;  or  patenteb 
i„  anp  countrp  foreign  to  tfje  Uniteb  states  on  an  application  fileb  more  than 
tloelbe  months!  prior  to  this  application;  or  in  public  use  or  on  Salem  the 
fHniteb  States  for  more  than  ttoo  pearS  prior  to  this  application ;  anb  tfjat  no 
application  for  patent  upon  Saib  inbention  fjnS  been  fileb  bp  him  or  IjiS  legal 
representatibes  or  assigns  in  anp  foreign  countrp. 

_t -  — - - 

&toorn  to  anb  subscribeb  before  me  this  a  d  bap 

_ Abvyxzs  - 

Jlotarp  public. 


[fteall 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 
UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 
WASHINGTON 


Tehy.  8,1911. 

Thomas  A,  Sdison,  ;■  o'  ' 

Care  Trunk  t.  ftyer,  ;  '■ 

0  ran  so,  Now  Jorsoy  .  j  j 

Please  find  below  a  communication  from  the  EX  A  til  HER  in  charge  of  your  application. 


for  Sound  peproduocre,  filed  .Tan.  4,1911, serial  number  600,762  . 


This  application  has  been  duly  examined.  ( 

It  being  common  in  lids  art  to  enclose  the  diaphragm 
stylus  bar  and  mountings  as  in  Run ge , Sept .  25,1906,  #831,^995, 
(181-11),  no  invention  can  hr.  seen  in  making  a.  container  of 
spherical  shape  us  in  Gorman  patent  #187,705,  Aug.  8,1907,  (l81-l0) 
and  all  of  the  claims  ure  accordingly  rejected  . 


Ill  THE  TOUTED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE. 


THOMAS  A.  EE I SOU,  ) 

SOTOID  REPRODUCERS,  •  ) 

Room  Ho.  379 

Filed  January  4,  1911,) 

Serial  Ho.  600,768.  ) 

HONORABLE  COMMISSIONER  OF  PATENTS, 

SIR: 

In  response  to  Office  action  of  February  8, 
1911,  please  amend  the  above  entitled  case  as  follows: 

Cancel  claims  2  and  3  and  change  the 
numeral  of  claim  4  to  2. 

Add  the  following  as  claim  3. 

3.  In  a  sound  reproducer,  the  combination  with  a 
sound  box, a  diaphragm  carried  thereby,  a  lever  pivoted  to 
said  s ound  box  and  connected  to  said  diaphragm,  and  a  stylus 
carried  by  said  lover, of  a  substantially  non-sound  trans¬ 
mitting  closure  in  the  form  of  a  continuous  closed  arch 
entirely  enclosing  said  sound  box  and  also  enclosing  a 
portion  of  said  lever  including  the  pivot  thereof,  the  horn 
conneotion  of  said  sound  box  and  said  stylus  extending  out 
through  said  closure,  substantially  as  described. 


REMARKS 

The  Examiner  iB  respectfully  requested  to  change 
the  reference  character  designating  the  pin  co-acting  with 
the  stirrup  14  from  3  to  13  in  both  of  the  figures. 

Claims  1  and  2  are  thought  to  be  allowable  in 
their  original  form  and  have,  therefore,  not  been  amended. 
Claim  1  differentiates  from  the  patents  of  record  by  speed- 


£yinB  "a  substantially  non-sound  transmitting  olonuro 
mounted  to  cover  tho  front  Bide  of  said  diaphragm  and  a 
portion  of  said  lever  including  tho  pivot  thereof” .  Ho- 
f erring  to  the  patent  to  Runge,  the  function  of  the  cover 
7  disclosed  therein  is/to  prevent  transmission  of  sound 
from  the  front  of  tho  diaphragm  and  the  stylus  lever  pivots 
hut  to  prevent  disturbance  of  the  device  by  an  accidental  blow 
and  to  shut  out  dust  and  dirt.  Sec  lines  97  to  101,  page  1 
of  Runge’ s  specification.  The  material  of  which  the 
cover  is  made  is  not  specified  by  Runge;  and  considering 
his  invention  as  disclosed,  a  material  capable  of  vibrating 
and  accordingly  of  transmitting  sounds  might  be  employed. 

In  tho  German  patent  of  record,  reference  to  the  material 
of  'which  the  member  o  is  made  is  likewise  omitted  and  the 
stylus  lever  is  not  supported  on  pivots  within  tho  said 
member  £. 

Claims  2  and  3  specify  that  the  enclosure 
entirely  encloses  tho  sound  box.  In  neither  of  the  patents 
of  record  is  the  rear  of  the  sound  box  enclosed ;and  the 
vibrations  emanating  from  this  part  of  the  sound  box 
are  accordingly  free  to  be  transmitted  to  the  ears.  In 
applicant's  device,  this  objection  is  obviated  by  entirely 
enclosing  the  sound  box. 

II  The  now  claim  which  is  presented  herewith  sots 

I  forth  that  the  entire  sound  box  and  also  a  portion  of  tjie 
stylus  lever  including  the  pivot  thereof  is  enclosed  by '{a 
substantially  non-sound  transmitting  closure  in  the  form)  of 
a  continuous  closed  arch,  features  which,  as  sot  forth  above, 
are  not  disclosed  in  the  references  of  record. 


Reconsideration  and  allowance  are  respectfully 


requested* 

Orange,  Hew  Jersey, 
January  $Co,  1912. 


Rospeotfully  submitted , 
EIIOMAS  A.  KDI30N, 


Them 


paper  N A 


■fi'1 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 
UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 
WASHINGTON 


A.  75fi.i-.nn, 

Cij.ro  Iran):  L.  Dyer, 
Orange,  ’low  Jersey  • 


U.S.  PATENT  OFFICE, 

MAR  1  1912 

M  A  ILED, 


mc  find  below  a 


Tor  Sound 

600,1*82  . 


communication  from,  the  EX  A 131  HER  in,  charge  of  your  application. 
■reproducers,  filed  .Tan.  4,1911,  or  rial  number 


Commmioner  of  Palma. 


Thin  action  in  responsive  to  the  amendment  vun.  , 

1912. 

An  applicant 1 s  constructs  his  casing  of  nctal,  an  excellent 
Bonnd  transmitting  moans,  he  must  depend  on  the  fora  of  hie 
cueing  rather  than  on  the  material  thereof  to  provide  a  non 
sound  transmitting  casing.  This  is  further  borne  out  by  the 
context  of  the  specification.  This  being  true,  the 
the  oermun  device  is  operative  to  perform  this  function  if 
applicant's  structure  is.  Note  that  the  German  reference  has 
a  complete  sound  box  inside  of  his  spherical  casing  except 
that  the  stylUB  bar  is  supported  from  the  outer  casing  instead 
of  from  the  inner.  Invention  is  not  seen  to  be  involved  in  alone 
supporting  the  German  stylus  bar  from  the  inner  casing,  especial¬ 
ly  in  view  that  it  is  old  to  provide  the  stylus  bar  mounting 
inside  of  a  oimdng  as  in  Runge  of  record  or  Johnson, Sept .  13, 
1904,  #769*896,  (181-3)'.  >  Accordingly  all  of  the  claims  are 
rejected. 

Claim  1  is  also  rejected  on  Johnson  alone.  Moreover,  non 
sound  transmitting  casings  are  old  as  in  Johnson  cited;  Robinson, 
Deo.  27,1904,  #770,271,  (101-3),  or  Bottini.jjao.  20,1092, 
#400,379,(101-10)  and  invention  is  not  found  in  making  suoh 


As''' 

of.  Jaoquoo,May  aK,ioau,#ao3,^9?), 


V/ 600, 762- . 2* 

1  in  vio.  of  ..»•»  .w.oluro.  II.no.  all  of  « 

cluii.ii>  -are  add.it innally  rojoctod. 

In  tha  structu.  . 

(1, •!-=),  01.0  n nuni.  K.x  i.  .nol.o.^fn  .  non  o.»nU  «—*«** 

,  .  -  .  .  •  *,i,._  .''318,568,  July  15,1008.  (181-8), 

caning.  ah  — '•••"  *-nv  ,  ’  1 

»  sound  ho*  in  entirely  enclosed  in'  a  cosing  that  will  exclude 
■fna  sound.  Invention  in  net  found  over  those  two  ctructuron  in 
applicant  *o  structure  and  the  claim  ..arc  -)  additionally 
ted  to,-  ouch  reasons,  further: .ore,  Haunt, leh. 
#9dOi»«9i(lBl-S),  dl.olo.OB.th.  ioolation  of  the-  nound  rising  on 
one  side  of  the  diaphragm  from  that  rising  on  the  o„hoi  nido. 

,roto  that  in  this  structure  the  stylus  har  mounting  is  inside 
of  the  casing.  V/hilo  (Mount  •  '  conducts  the  sound  from  both 

,  Cfiew  of  the  references  , of 
sides  of  the  diaphragm  to  -the.  ears  ^  view 

record,  invention  is  not  found  in  completing  the  enclosure 

,  ,  *  rit,.v vugra  .  Accordingly 

provided  for  the  outer  side  of  -nc  diup.i  ^..n 

all  of  the  clains  are  additionally  rejected  for  such  reason. 


■beg  to  advise  you  that  v/e  have  made  title  searches  of  the 
patents  referred  to  in  your  letter  and  have  to  report  as 
follows 

Apple ,  932,087:- 

\7e  have  to  report  that  we  have  been  unable  to 


find  any  instruments  of  record  affecting  the  title  to  this 
patent  up  to  and  including  Dec.  15,  1910,  the  last  date  of 
record  on  the  assignment  digest. 


Robinson,  778.271:- 

V/e  have  made  a  careful  search  through  the  assign-. 


ment  records  with  reference  to  this  patent  and  have  found 
but  one  assignment  of  record  affecting  the  title  thereto,' 
namely,  an  assignment  from  Eugene  M.  Robinson  to  Rudolph- 
Y/utlitzer  Co.,  corporation  of  Ohio,  Cincinnati,  0.,  assign¬ 
ing  all  the  right,  title  and  interest  in  patents  Nos. 
778,271,  813, '870,  and  831,188,  and  all  rights  of  recov¬ 
ery  for  past  infringements  thereof  by  third  parties.  This 
assignment  was  acknowledged  Sept.  20,  1906,.  and  recorded 
Jan.  6,  1907,  in  liber  V,  75,  page  273. 


Mr.  Edition  is  desirous  of  mounting  a  closure  over  the 
front  of  the  reproducer,  as  shown  in  the  patent  drawing  which 
I  hand  you  herewith,  to  smother  the  sounds  given  off  hy  the 
front  of  the  diaphragm.  A  device  dominating  this  is  shown  in 
patent  to  Robinson,  No.  778,271,  Dec.  27,  1904  herewith.  The 
only  substantial  difference  is  that  Robinson  makes  his  enclosing 
cap  J52  of  cardboard  or  other  non- sound-transmitting  material 
and  cylindrical  in  form,  while  Mr.  Edison  makes  his  of  brass 
preferably,  and  rounds  it  out  as  illustrated  to  prevent  vi¬ 
bration  of  the  same.  I  think  Robinson's  Claim  2  is  infringed 
by  this  device,  and  would  recommend  that  we  attempt  to  buy 
Robinson's  patent  if  Mr.  Edison  wishes  to  use  the  device  in 
the  machine  to  be  manufactured. 


-1638 


MEMORANDUM 


)rk‘6'-2- 

Mr.  Smith:  12/83/10. 

Referring  to  your  note  of  the  28nd  inst. ,  X  hardly  think 
it  worth  while  to  attempt  to  huy  the  patent  to  Robinson  for  the 
following  reasons: 

1.  It  has  not  been  definitely  decided  to  enclose  the 
open  side  of  the  speaker  as  Mr.  Edison  proposes.  When  that  has 
been  definitely  decided  the  question  of  buying  the  Robinson  patent 
can  be  considered. 

2.  I  do  not  think  Mr.  Edison's  suggestion  infringes 
the  Robinson  patent.  Robinson  slides  his  cap  over  the  body  of 
the  speaker  and  holds  it  in  place  friotionally.  Both  the 


P.S.-2  .  -•  •:  '  . 

second  ana  third  claims  are  limited  to  the  fact  that  the  cap  is 
"adapted  to  slidably  fit  over  and  cover  one  side  of  the  reproducer 


of  the  phonograph".  Mr.  Edison's  device  is  simply  a  spherical 
•  containing  box  entirely  surrounding  the  reproducer  and  not  fitted 
to  it;  this  strikeB  me  as  being  a  different  invention. 

3.  The  idaa  of  muffling  the  sounds  developed  at  the 
open  side  of  the  diaphragm  is  very  old,  and  I  think  you  will  find 
a  number  of  Edison  patents  disclosing  this.  Perhaps  there  are 
other  patents.  The  suggestion  has  often  been  developed  in  the 
laboratory  and  is  one  of  the  common  thoughts  of  the  phonograph 
business.  Ho  doubt  Mr.  Pierman  or  Bred  Ott  can  give  you  a 
good  deal  of  information  on  this 

,  E.  1.  Djl 

eid/iot 


Patent  Series 


Patent  Application  Files 
Storage  Battery 


U.S.  Patent#:  1034002 

Primary  Applicant:  Edison,  Thomas  A 
Date  Executed:  1  /25/1 91 1 


<2L%h  yty&ti 
yx*. r&r^-cct/  ■ 


ffC^)  y& ^tntA^tKT^e^tt - J 

K.tfcru^'  *<%ccd&  - 


Patent  Series 
Patent  Application  Files 

Folio  #  691  Insulating  Compound 

U.S.  Patent#:  1083354 

Primary  Applicant:  Edison,  Thomas  A 

Date  Executed:  1/25/1911 


Patent  Series 


Patent  Application  Files 


Folio  #  692  Composition  for  Sound-Records  and  Other  Objects 

U.S.  Patent#:  1002505 

Primary  Applicant:  Edison,  Thomas  A 


Date  Executed:  1/25/1911 


(.t-TfC.  \rfcw.  --4w^tj  cK'.p  w^V. 

(jpdhjsZjZb  •  ' 


c<r^  ddj>-  d^Cf^ 


M^J  <SLA^  -or 

^  ^  ^  -u 
’■'W^  J  _,^r..G  cxsX^CU 

Jb>  c,  UXA^  ^^  ^  ■ 


X  ^  (^L  ^P...oJb  ^ 


l2p^^ TZ- ' 

-^-U,  •>-,-.  .-.-O,  . 


O  £• 


Patent  Series 
Patent  Application  Files 

Folio#  698  Sound-Box  for  Phonograph 

U.S.  Patent#:  1187146 

Primary  Applicant:  Holland,  Newman  H 
Date  Executed:  2/1 5/1911 


CORRECTIONS 


Folio#  700 


Talking  Machines  (Case  A) 


Serial  #:  609099 

Primary  Applicant:  Edison,  Thomas  A 
Date  Executed:  2/15/1911 


. . ^ . 

c  J;  ‘  '  '  *(* ;>  £  ' 


...{2??C<*,'A'Smr+.r*?. . C<Z*r...).. . 


Filed  t^£0J/-  . " 


Examiner’s  Room  No. . 


Assignee 
Ass’g’t  Exec... 


y 7V 

-.  ,.-  iA.- 


1  . . /£,  / 4/!  • 

;{  Jh..?k..l,.Z.7  U.’i.tJr 


FRANK  L.  DYER, 

Counsel, 

Orange,  New  Jersey. 


petition 


®o  tlje  Commissioner  of  patents!: 

gout-  petitioner  thojias  a.  meson, 
a  citijen  of  tfje  Uniteb  States,  resibing  anb  fjabing  a  $ost  ©ffice  abbress  at 

Llewellyn  Park,  V/ost  Orange,  County  of  •gases,  State  of  Haw  Jersey 


praps  tfjat  letters  patent  map  be  granteb  to  Ijim  for  tfje  improbements  in 


-  TALKIHC  JiACHItTES  - 


set  fortfj  in  tfje  annexeb  specification;  anb  fje  fjcrebp  appoints  jfranfc  TL.  J3per 
(Registration  j?o.  560),  of  ©range,  iJetu  Jersep,  Jjis  attornep,  Uiitfj  full 
poUicr  of  substitution  anb  rebocation,  to  prosecute  tfjis  application,  to  mafec 
alterations  anb  amenbments  therein,  to  reccibe  tfje  patent,  anb  to  transact  all 
business  in  tfje  patent  ©ffice  connecteb  tljeretuitfj. 


ji  SPECIFICATION. 

ji  TO  ALL  WHOM  IT  MAY  CONCERN:  j 

BE  IT  K3TOWH,  that  I,  THOMAS  A.  EDISON,  a 
ji  citizen  of  the  United  States  and  a  resident  of  Llewellyn  j 
Park,  West  Orange*  in  the  County  of  Essex  and  State  of 
jj  New  Jersey,  have  made  a  certain  new  and  useful  invention 
j  in  TALKING  MACHINES,  of  which  the  following  is  a  de- 
\  soription: 

My  invention  relates  to  talking  machines  and 
more  particularly  to  means  for  holding  the  sound  record 
,  employed  with  such  machines  against  rotation  with 
jj  reference  to  its  support.  | 

jj  It  has  heretofore  been  customary  in  machines 

Ij  in  which  a  record  of  diso  form  was  supported  on  a  rotatable 
ij  support  to  rely  upon  the  friction  between  the  record  and 
j!  support  to  prevent  relative  rotary  movement  between  these 
jj  parts.  When,  however,  a  reproducer  of  considerable  weight 
;j  is  used  with  such  machines,  it  is  found  that  this  friction 
I  is  not  sufficient  to  prevent  such  relative  movement  and  thai 
|  the  reproduction  i0  accordingly  imperfect.  It  is  the 
;j  object  of  ay  invention  to  obviate  this  objection  by  the 
jj  provision  of  means  for  positively  locking  the  record  to  its 

I 

|  support . 

jj  With  t»i®  and  other  objects  in  view,  my  in- 

!:i  vention  consists  of  the  features  hereinafter  set  forth  and 
claimed. 

In  order  that  my  invention  may  he  more  fully 
j  understood,  attention  is  hereby  directed  to  the  accompany- 


iili 


! 


|i  ing  drawing  forming  a  part  of  this  specification  and  in  J 
I'  whioh  - 

i  Figure  1  represents  a  central,  vertical  sectional 

j;  view  of  a  portion  of  a  talking  machine  embodying  one  form 
!|  of  my  invention,  some  of  the  parts  being  shown  in  ele- 
;|  vat  ion. 

:|  Figure  2  represents  a  plan  view  thereof; 

Figure  3  represents  a  central,  vertical  section-  ; 

j!  al  view  of  a  device  embodying  a  modified  form  of  my  in-  | 

j!  | 

j|  vention  and  j 

Figure  4  represents  a  plan  view  thereof. 

In  all  of  the  views  corresponding  parts  are  | 

j  designated  by  the  same  reference  numerals.  ' 

E  Referring  to  Figures  1  and  2,  JL  represents  the 

|j  top  of  the  cabinet  of  a  talking  machine  in  which  is  rotat- 
|  ably  mounted  the  shaft  2  for  driving  the  table  3,  which  is 
j  adapted  to  support  a  sound  record  4^.  represents  a  pin 
ij  er  equivalent  meanB  for  securing  the  table  3  to  the  shaft 
]|  2.  The  upper  end  6^  of  the  shaft  projects  above  the  table 
|  and  is  adapted  to  engage  the  central  aperture  7.  ^he 
;l  record  and  thus  to  form  a  bearing  for  the  record, 
j  In  order  to  prevent  relative  rotation  between 

:  the  record  and  the  shaft  2,  the  end  6  of  the  latter  is 
|j  provided  with  a  key  or  equivalent  means  8  preferably 
|j  engaging  in  a  slot  or  key  way  9  in  the  record.  In  the 
|i  form  of  my  Invention  shown  in  Figures  1  and  2,  this  key 
|  is  solid  with  the  shaft  2.  In  the  modification  shown 
j  in  Figures  3  and  4,  the  key  is  slidable  radially  of  the 
|i  shaft  and  record  in  the  reoess  10  in  the  shaft  2  and  is 


«2' 


forced  into  engagement  with  the  record  hy  a  spring  or 
equivalent  yielding  means  11.  While  the  key  in  this 
modification  ia  shown  as  co-operating  with  a  keyway, 
obviously  this  modification  could  he  used  with  records 
not  provided  with  a  key  way.  In  the  latter  case,  the 
key  would  he  forced  into  the  recess  10  and  would  he  held 
hy  the  spring  11  in  firm  frictional  engagement  with  the 
v/all  of  the  aperture  7  in  the  record.  As  shown  in 
figure  3,  the  key  8  co-operates  with  a  key  way  12  in  the 
table  3  to  lock  the  latter  to  the  shaft  2, 

Having  now  described  my  invention,  what  I  claim 
as  new  and  desire  to  secure  hy  Letters  patent  of  the  United! 
States  is  as  follows:  j 

f't  lUA-rJ.i&tl'  ' _  ! 

ij  1 ,  In  a  talking  machine ,  the  combination  o *  a 

record\support ,  a  record  carried  thereby,  and  a  rotatable 
driving  shaft  secured  to  said  support  atid  forming  a  bearing 
for  said\ecord,  said  shaft  and  record  being  provided  with 
means  for  positively  looking  the  same  against  relative 
rotation,  substantially  as  described. 

I  2.  In  a\  talking  machine,  the  combination  of  a 

j|  record  support,  V  record  carried  thereby,  and  a  rotatable 
||  driving  3haft  secured  to  said  support  and  forming  a  bearing 
|  for  said  record,  sdid  shaft  and  record  being  provided  with 

1  interfitting  means  fbr  j 
relative  rotation, 

jj  3,  In  a  talking  Machine,  the  combination  of  a 


positively  looking  the  sane  against 
it  anti  ally  as  deBcribdd. 


record  support,  a  reoord  \jarried  thereby,  and  a  rotatable 
driving  shaft  secured  to  s\id  support  and  forming  a  bearing 


ij  for  said  record^  aaid  shaft  and  record  being  provided  with 
'I  a  key  and  slot  connection  for  looking  the  same  against 
I1  relative  rotation,  substantially  as  described. 

|  H.  In  a  talking  machine,  the  combination  of  a  record  j 

;!  support ,  a  rotatable  driving  shaft  secured  to  said  support 
j  and  forming  a  bearing  for  the  record,  a  key  mounted  in  said 
s  shaft 'and-  means  for  forcing  the  said  key  into  engagement 
j  with  the  record  to  lock  the  same  against  rotation  with  j 

;!  respect  to  said  shaft,  substantially  a3  described.  j 

'5.  In  a  talking  machine,  the  combination  of  a  rec-  j 

ord  support,  a  rotatable  driving  shaft  secured  to  said  ! 

i;  support  and.  forming  a  bearing  for  the  record,  a  koy  | 

Ij  mounted  in  said  shaft,  and  yielding  means  for  forcing  j 

j  the  said  key  into  engagement  with  the  record  to  look  the 
j  same  against  rotation  with  respect  to  sail  shaft,  sub- 
j!  stantially  as  described. 

|  fe.  In  a  talking  machine,  the  combination  of  a 

record  support,  a  rotatable  driving  shaft  secured  to  aaid 
|j  support  and  forming  at  its  upper  end  a  bearing  for  the 
j  record,  ('the  said  upper  end  of  the  shaft  being  provided  with 
|  a  reoess,  and  a  spring  pressed  key  slidably  mounted  in  said 
reoess,  and  adapted  to  look  the  record  against  rotation 
with  respect  to  said  shaft,  substantially  as  described. 


®fjis  specification  signet)  anb  toitneSSeb  tljis  )  ^  bap  ofc^4«*^j0l; 

Cl-j  Ctl^<L.r^Ly 

©HitneSSctf): 

1  ^/U&toA<e<k . \C.X>rZ. . 

2  ■JQ-lrt-r*-**'  iikx-L^-^ . 

©atlx 

g>tate  of  JJeto  fersep  j  ^ 

Countp  of  €ssex  ) 

thOjvia  s  a  .  tsdison  .  tfjc  abobc  nanieb 
petitioner,  being  bulg  Stuorn,  beposes  mib  Saps  tfjat  fjc  is  a  citijen  of  tfje  llniteb 
states,  anb  a  resibent  Of  Llewellyn  Par*,  West  Orange,  New  jersey 

tijat  ije  berihj  beliebes  {jimself  to  be  tije  original,  first  anb  Sole  inbentor  of  tlje 
improbeinents  in  talking  machine 

bcScribcb  anb  claimeb  in  tlje  antiexeb  Specification ;  tfjat  Ijc  boes  not  bnoto  anb 
boeS  not  beliebe  tfjat  tlje  Same  tons  eber  Unobin  or  useb  before  fjis  inbention  or 
biscoberp  tfjereof ;  or  patenteb  or  beScribeb  in  anp  printeb  publication  in  tlje 
tSiniteb  States  of  America  or  anp  foreign  countrp  before  Ijis  inbention  or 
biscoberp  tljcreof,  or  jnore  tfjan  ttoo  pears  prior  to  tljis  application;  or  patenteb 
in  anp  countrp  foreign  to  tlje  Uniteb  States  on  an  application  fileb  more  tljan 
ttoelbe  montljs  prior  to  tljis  application;  or  in  public  use  or  on  sale  in  tlje 
Uniteb  States  for  more  tljan  lino  pears  prior  to  tljis  application;  anb  tijat  no 
application  for  patent  upon  Saib  inbention  bos  been  fileb  bp  Ijint  or  bis  legal 
representatibes  or  assigns  in  anp  foreign  countrp. 

Stuorn  to  anb  subscribeb  before  me  tljis  > s  bap  ofl^-^«-y  191  y 

[&eal] 


j©otarp  public. 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 


7  0  0  UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 

WASHINGTON  Kerch _1  & , 1911  . 

Thomas  A.  Edison,  '  •  ",:j 

Caro  frank  L.  Dyor,  :  j 

Orange,  Mow  Jersey  .  I 


Ple-ase  find  below  a  communis 

for  Talking  nnchinea, 


ation  from  the  EXAMINER  in  charge  of  your  application. 

filed  t«eh.  17,1911,  serial  number  609,099  . 


.  This  application  has  been  duly  examined  • 

Claims  1,  2  and  ^  are  re, lacked  upon  either  Taint, er.^uly 
10,1880,  #385,887-;  TToffman,  kov .  12,1907,  #870,961,  or  Milans, 
October  2,19o6,  #832,40.3,  all  in  (181-17). 

Claims  4,  5  and  6  are  rejected  upon  the  cited  art,  in 
view  of  Vnliquet, Jan.  17 ,1905 , . #780, 246,  (181-3).  -0  invention  oan 

ho  found  in  making  -the-' center  Pont  key  spring  pressed  in  view 

that  a  lcoy  spring  pressed  to  retain  the  record  upon  the  table  is 
an  old  expedient  in  this  art  . 


Ill  THE  UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFPICH. 


THOMAS  A.  EDISON ,  ) 

TALKING  MACHINES,  ) 

Room  Ho.  370. 

Piled  February  17,  1911,) 

Serial  Ho.  609,099.  ) 

HOHORABLE  COMMISSIONER  OP  PATENTS, 

SIR: 

In  response  to  Office  action  of  March  16, 
1911,  please  amend  the  above  entitled  case  as  follows; 

Cancel  claims  1,  &  and  3  and  renumber 
claims  4,  5  and  6  ns  1,  2  and  3. 

Add  the  following  as  claim  4: 

4.  In  a  talking  machine,  the  combination  of  a 
record  support,  a  rotatable  driving  shaft  secured  to 
said  support  and  forming  at  its  upper  end  a  bearing  for 
the  record,  the  said  upper  end  of  the  shaft  being  provided 
vfith  a  recess,  a  key  mounted  in  said  recess  and  movable 
to  a  position  ontiroly  within  the  same,  and  a  spring 
tending  to  force  said  key  out  of  said  recess  and  into 
engagement  with  the  record,  substantially  as  described. 


REMARKS 

None  of  the  references  of  record  discloses 
a  key  mounted  in  the  driving  shaft  of  the  record  support 
and  moans  for  forcing  the  said  key  into  engagement  with 
the  record  to  lock  the  same  against  rotation  with  respect 
to  said  shaft.  The  Examiner  states  that  "Ho  invention 
can  bo  found  in  making  the  center  post  key  spring  pressed 
in  view  that  a  key  spring  pressed  to  retain  the  record 
upon  the  table  is  an  old  expedient  in  this  art"  ,  the  last 


part  of  this  (flotation  evidently  referring  to  the  dis¬ 
closure  of  the  patent  to  Valiquet.  Eeforring  to  the  patenjt 
to  Valiquet,  the  spring  pressed  pin  disolosod  therein  is 
not  mounted  in  the  driving  shaft,  as  onlled  for  by  the 
claims,  hut  is  located  a  considerable  distance  to  one  sido  | 
of  the  Bamo.  Such  a  construction  is  not  only  less 
simple  than  that  set  forth  in  the  applicant's  claims,  hut 
requires  a  specially  formed  record  tablet  having  a  recess 
or  opening  which  must  always  he  located  a  fixed  distance 
•from  the  center  of  the  record.  Because  of  expansion  and 
contraction  of  the  record  due  to  temperature  changes,  the 
distance  between  the  center  of  the  record  and  the  said 
recess  or  opening  undergoes  an. appreciable  change.  *t  is 
not  seen  how  Valiquet' s  construction  could  suggest  that 
set  forth  in  any  of  applicant's  claims;  and  in  viov;  of 
the  simplicity  and  obvious  advantage  of  the  latter  con¬ 
struction  over  prior  constructions,  it  is  thought  that  the 
claims  are  patentable. 

Pew  claim  4  distinguishes  from  the  references 
of  record  for  the  roasons  set  forth  above  and  al30  by 
specifying  that  the  key  is  movable  to  a  position  entirely 
within  the  slot  in  the  driving  shaft.  By  reason  of  this 
construction,  the  applicant's  looking  moans  may  be  used 
ij  with  records  with  or  without  a  slot  leading  from  the 

oenter  aperture  and  is,  therefore,  of  general  application. 
So  suoh  construction  is  either'  shown  or  suggested  by  the 
references  of  record. 

Reconsideration  and  allowance  ar„e  accordingly 
respectfully  requested. 

Respectfully  submitted. 

Orange,  Hew  Jersey,  THOMAS  A.  EDISOH, 

February  *  ^  1912-  By  _ 


his  Attorney. 


v-  -2-5”  Room_-W9 

J.H.D.-S. 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 


UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 

WASHINGTON  Maroh  27>191S* 


■v 

Thomas  A.  Edison,  > 

Care  Erank  E.  Dyer, 
Orange,  Hew  Jersey  . 


D.S.  PATENT  OFFICE, 

MAR  a/ 1912 

MAILED. 


Please  find  below  a  communication  from  the  EXAMINER  in  charge  of  your  application. 

for  Talking  Machines, filed  yob.  17,1911, serial  nunher  609,099  . 


This  action  is  responsive  to  the  amendment  filed  3Job.  26, 

1912. 

All  of  the  claims  are  rejected  upon  Hoffman  of  record  or 

o 

Tainter,  July  10,1860, #385, 886,  (181-3), see  43,  in  view  of 
Sweet, <,ept.  10, 1901, #682, ■5°d'7,  (74-0earing, Slidable  Key.)  Inven¬ 
tion  is  not  found  in  making  the  keys  of  Tainter  or  Hoffman  spring 
pressed  in  view  of  Sweet’s  structure.  It  1b  not  seen  that  any 
funotion  lias  been  obtained  but  what  is  obvious  from  the 
employment  of  a  spring  pressed  key  in  the  talking  machine 


structures^ itod  • 


Patent  Series 


Patent  Application  Files 


Folio#  715  Alternating  Current  Motor 


U.S.  Patent#:  1214883 

Primary  Applicant:  Bliss,  Donald  M 
Date  Executed:  3/1 0/1911 


fW-'X  VC-" 


Mr.  Edison: 


EOIIO  715 


,±0  -  application^  Donald  M.  Bliss  for 
Alternating  Current  Motors 


fhis  application  covers  a  combined  inductio: 
pulsion  motor  designed  to  operate  on  a  single  phase  circuit  and 
self-starting.  X  understand  that  we  do  not  use  this  motor. 

This  application  is  one  of  a  group  of  applications  assigned  to 
Thomas  A.  Edison,  Inc.  which  you  decided  to  prosecute  and  make  a 
reasonable  effort  to  secure  the  allowance  of  the  claims  because  of 
the  agreement  with  Mr.  Bliss.  '  Che  interest  of  Ur.  Bliss  in  this  ^ 
application  or  a  patent  granted  on  it  is  that  if  the  we  sell  the 
application  or  patent,  or  grant  a  license,  Mr.  Bliss  is  entitled 
to  receive  86*  of  all  moneys  or  other  consideration  received  by  us 
from  such  sale  or  as  royalties  under  such  licenses.  t 

We  have  been  able  to  secure  the  allowance  o^#°r 


ing  claims:- 


1.  An  armature  comprising  a  core  of  magnetic  Vterial 

of  theSopenings ,  substantially  as  described. 

2  An  armature  comprising  a  core  of  magnetic  ma- 

described. 


The  following  claims  have  been  rejected: 


3.  In  an  alternating  current  motor,  a  rotor  compris¬ 
ing  a  core  of  magnetic  material,  a  completely  closed-circuited 
squirrel  cage  winding  and  a  commutated  winding  located  near  • 
the  periphery  of  the  said  core,  each  winding  being  uniformly 
distributed  around  the  core  and  with  portions  of  each  winding 
between  portions  of  the  other  winding,  and  a  commutator  and 
short  circuited  brushes  for  the  commutated  winding,  substan¬ 
tially  as  described. 

5.  In  an  alternating  current  motor,  a  rotor  compris¬ 
ing  a  core  of  magnetic  material,  a  completely  closed- 
circuited  squirrel  cage  winding  and  a  commutated  winding, 
the  active  conductors  of  both  being  located  near  the  per¬ 
iphery  of  the  said  oore  and  substantially  equidistant  from 
the  axis  thereof,  each  winding  being  uniformly  distributed 
around  the  core  and  the  two  windings  being  so  related  that 
substantially  all  of  the  flux  threading  any  coil  of  the 
commutated  winding  threads  also  a  closed-circuited  portion 
of  the  squirrel  cage  winding,  substantially  as  described. 


These  claims  are  rejected  on  the  patent  to  Arnold  Ho. 
562,365,  see  particularly  the  diagrammatic  shown  in  Pig.  4,  the 
Examiner  holding  that  the  short  circuited  windings  a'  shown  in 
this  figure  are  the  equivalent  of  the  aharfr  circuited  squirrel 
oage  winding  employed  in  the  Bliss  motor  and  recited  in  the  claims. 
While  it  is  doubtful  whether  the  Examiner  is  correct  in  this  pos¬ 
ition,  it  would  seem  that  the  invention  is  a  narrow  one  in  view  of 
the  Arnold  patent  and  the  patent  to  Bretoh  Ho.  848,719,  and  that 
^the  Office  has  allowed  us  reasonably  good  claims.  The  question 
now  is  whether  you  wish  an  appeal  taken  against  the  final  rejection 
of  claims  3  and  5,  or  whether  we  shall  cancel  these  claims  and 
&  \j6 


(I  /' 


Patent  Series 


Patent  Application  Files 


Folio#  719  Sound-Box 

U.S.  Patent#:  1204420 

Primary  Applicant:  Edison,  Thomas  A 


Date  Executed:  3/22/1911 


Patent  Series 
Patent  Application  Files 

Folio  #  720  Sound  Boxes 

Serial#:  616756 

Primary  Applicant:  Edison,  Thomas  A 

Date  Executed:  3/22/1911 


petition 


tEo  tfje  Commissioner  of  patents: 

gour  Petitioner  tiio,’£AS  a.  Edison, 
a  citizen  of  tije  fHniteb  States,  resibing  anb  ijabing  a  Post  ©ffice  abbrcSS  at 

Llewellyn  Park,  West  Orange,  "Bs k ex  County,  New  Jersey, 


praps  tljat  letters  patent  map  be  granteb  to  ijitn  for  tlje  iinprobements  in 


SOUND  BOXES 


net  fortlj  in  tfje  annexeb  Specification ;  anb  ije  fjerebp  appoints  Jfranfe  TL.  ©per 
(Registration  ilo.  560),  of  ©range,  J2eto  STerSep,  IjiS  attornep,  toitfj  full 
pobier  of  substitution  anb  rebocation,  to  prosecute  tfjis  application,  to  mabe 
alterations  anb  amenbments  tfjerein,  to  receibe  tfje  patent,  anb  to  transact  all 
business  in  tfje  Patent  ©ffice  connected  tljeretoitfj. 


S  P  ?  0  I  I  I  0  i  I  I  0  B, 


ji  TO  ALL  WHOM  IT  MAY  CONCERN:  j 

I  BE  IT  KNOWN,  that  I,  THOJIAS  A.  EDISON,  a  | 

|  citizen  of  the  United  states  and  a  resident  of  Llewellyn  j 

I  Park,  West  Orange,  in  the  County  of  Essex  and  State  of  j 

j  New  j-ersey,  have  invented  certain  new  and  useful  im- 
|  proveraents  in  SOUND  30XE8  of  which  the  following  is  a  j 

I  description: 

ii  ! 

i;  My  invention  relates  to  sound  boxes  particularly  : 

J  of  the  type  adapted  far  use  in  connection  with  diso  ! 

ij  records  having  vertically  undulating  grooves,  although  i 
ij  its  use  is  not  limited  to  that  type.  The  principal 
j  object  of  my  invention  is  to  construct  a  reproducer  ; 

!  giving  an  improved  quality  of  reproduction  "by  the  elimina-  j 
|  tion  of  minute  scratch  vibrations  and  by  the  reduction  I 
of  the  prominence  of  objectionable  high  or  low  notes.  : 

Another  object  of  my  invention  is  to  provide  a  oonstruotion| 
whereby  the  loudness  of  the  reproduction  is  materially  j 
j  increas ed; and  it  is  in  this  feature  that  the  principal  \ 

I  difference  between  the  present  invention  and  that  dis-  | 
j  closed  in  my  application,  Serial  no.  (■>(■.  filed  j 

j! 'exists.  As  in  the  last  named  invention  I 
!  insert  between  the  stylus  arm  and  the  diaphragm,  a  yielding 
non-raetallio  member  of  short  elasticity  preferably  of  cork, j 
to  absorb  the  scratch  vibrations.  In  order  to  obtain 
a  loud  reproduction  and  at  the  same  time  to  balance  up  the  | 
tone  of  the  diaphragm,  I  connect  the  stylus  arm  with  the  j 
diaphragm  eccentrically  of  the  latter,  as  will  be  more 

I 

-1-  I 


jl  fully  explained  in  the  following  speoifioation.  X  also 
prefer  to  make  the  stylus  arm  of  wood  or  other  suitable 
!  non-netalllc  suhstanoe  so  as  to  eliminate  the  oharaoteris- 
I  tic  "ring"  or  metallic  sound  which  is  produced  when  the 
!  com, non  metallic  stylus  arm  is  set  into  vibration. 

Other  objects  of  my  invention  will  appear  more 
fully  from  the  following  specification  and  appended 
claims . 

In  order  that  my  invention  may  be  more  clearly 
|  understood,  attention  iB  hereby  directed  to  the  accompany¬ 
ing  drawing  forming  a  part  of  this  specification  and 
j  illustrating  a  preferred  form  of  my  invention. 

In  the  drawing, 

Figure  1  represents  a  central  vertical  section 
|j  through  a  sound  reproducer  embodying  ray  invention; 

|  Figure  2  represents  a  bottom  plan  view  thereof; 


|j  and 

S  Figure  3  represents  a  diagranraatio  view  showing 

|j  how  the  tone  of  the  diaphragm  is  balanced  by  my  improved 
ij  construction. 

:|  In  all  tho  views,  like  parts  are  designated  by 

|  the  same  roforonee  numerals . 

j!  Hef erring  to  the  drawings,  the  body  of  tho 

reproducer  is  formed  in  any  suitable  manner  as  by  the 
flat  metallic ,  conioal  member  1  having  secured  thereto 
a  hollow  nook  2,  bent  substantially  at  a  right  angle, 

J  the  flanged  annulus  3,  and  tho  threaded  ring  4  screwed 

[into  the  annulus  3  to  position  and  hold  the  members  as 
shown.  The  diaphragm  5  is  preferably  secured  between 
jj  an  annular'1  gasket  6  of  circular  cross  section  and  a  ring 
li  2  preferably  of  Bteel  formed  with  a  knife  edge,  as  shown, 

r 


which  is  positioned  to  contact  the  edge  of  the  diaphragm 

in  a  circular  line  opposite  the  centre  of  the  annular 

gasket  6 .  By  reason  of  this  construction,  the  diaphragm 

is  permitted  to  bend  on  the  gasket  £  and  ring  _7  without 

buckling.  I  preferably  form  the  diaphragm  j5  of  wood 

i  pulp  board  making  the  inner  face  thereof  plane  and  the 

{  outer  face  thereof,  except  for  a  short  distanoe  from  the  \ 

!  periphery,  convex;  so  that  the  diaphragm  has  substantially  | 

i  the  form  of  a  segment  of  a  sphere.  This  form  gives  to  j 

the  diaphragm  increased  rigidity  towards  the  centre  and 

eliminates  objectionable  looal  vibration.  ^ -  j 

!  The  stylus  arm  8  which  is  pre$erab ily  made  of  ! 

- 

lj  wood^is  rigidly  secured  to  the  member  3  ty  a  bracket  or 
;  saddle  9  held  in  place  on  the  horizontal  flange  3'  of  the 
,  member  3  by  screws  or  other  fastening  means  10.  A  strip 
;  11  of  metal  or  other  suitable  material  is  Interposed  j 

|  between  the  stylus  arm  and  the  flange  3^'  so  as  to  space  j 

|  the  said  arm  a  proper  distance  from  the  diaphragm  and  is  j 

:  held  in  place  by  the  bracket  9 . 

The  stylus  arm  8  extends  substantially  parallel 
!  to  the  diaphragm,  and,  at  its  outer  end,  which  extends 
|j  some  distanoe  beyond  the  centre  of  the  diaphragm,  supports 
|j  a  member  12  between  which  and  the  diaphragm  is  interposed 
j|  a  piece  13  of  cork  or  other  yielding  non-raetalllo  material 
!  of  short  elasticity.  The  cork  13  is  preferably  secured 
by  shellao  or  other  suitable  adhesive  to  the  member  12 
and  the  diaphragm.  The  stylus  14,  which  is  preferably 
a  diamond,  is  mounted  in  a  holder  15  which  is  provided 
with  a  shank  16,  secured  in  any  suitable  way  to  the  stylus 
arm,  preferably  in  a  position  to  locate  the  stylus  14  sub- 
i  stantially  under  the  centre  of  the  diaphragm.  The  stylus 

!  "3" 


of  the  | 

j!  latter,  the  distance  from  the  point  of  application  of  the  | 
jj  forces  tending  to  vibrate  the  diaphragm  to  the  various  j 
ll  points  on  the  periphery  of  the  diaphragm  var.ies  as  shown  j 
|  in  "Figure  3.  The  result  of  this  construction  is  that  j 
I  the  diaphragm  is  not  in  tune  with  any  particular  note  and  ! 

that,  therefore,  a  well  balanoed  tone  is  obtained,  j 

jj  Furthermore,  by  reason  of  the  connection  of  the  stylus  j 
ji  arm  to  the  diaphragm  eccentrically  of  the  latter,  the  j 

!  movements  of  the  centre  of  the  diaphragm  are  magnified  j 
|  as  will  be  evident;  so  that  a  reproduction  of  increased  j 
■  loudness  is  obtained.  The  magnification  of  the  vibrations! 

of  the  diaphragm  may-  also  he-  increased  by  locating  the 
i  Btylus  14  intermediate  the  connection  12,  13  and  the  ! 

fixed  end  of  the  arm  8,  as  shown.  By  reason  of  the  , 

!  employment  of  the  cork  insert  13,  a  large  amount  of 
8  minute  scratch  vibrations  ordinarily  emitted  when  the 
stylus  is  tracking  a  record,  are  absorbed;  and  by  making 
the  arm  8  of  wood  the  objectionable  "ring"  which  is  emitted 
j  "by  the  oommon  form  of  metallic  stylus  arm  during  its  ! 

'I  vibration  is  eliminated.  ' 

5  In  order  to  make  the  arm  8  resilient  in  the  j 

;j  direction  of  the  movement  of  the  stylus  14,  that  is,  j 

jj  at  right  angles  to  the  record  surface,  the  lower  surface  j 
I  thereof  is  preferably  concaved  intermediate  its  ends  as  ^ 
!l  shown  at  Vt_  so  that  the  cross  section  of  the  intermediate  j 

1  portion  of  the  arm  in  materially  decreased.  With  this  | 
construction  the  stylus  is  held  firmly  in  contact  with  the  j 
|  record  groove  so  that  the  record  is  faithfully  reproduced,  j 
ij  As  shown  in  Figure  2,  the  stylus  arm  is  preferably  wedge  j 


arm.  being  connected  to  the  diaphragm  ecoent 


»4* 


|  shaped  in  horizontal  section,  the  broader  end  of  the  arm 
being  secured  to  the  member  3,  so  that  the  stylus  is 
j  held  rigidly  against  movements  transverse  to  the  record 
!!  groove.  TMs  feature  also  adds  to  the  correctness  and 
|  quality  of  the  reproduction. 

!|  while  j  have  shown  the  preferred  embodiment 

j  of  my  invention,  it  is  evident  that  many  modifications 
j  may  be  made  in  the  structure  disclosed  without  departing  | 
I!  from  the  spirit  of  my  invention.  j 

ji  tThat  I  claim  as  new  and  desire  t.o  protect  by  j 

S  Letters  Patent  of  the  United  States  is  as  follows: 

/  A  '/Uk.  -  J’.  .•<-?/ A' 

jj  -j,  in  a  device  of  the  class  described,  the  com- 

j  hinatiL  with  a  diaphragm  and  a  support  therefor,  of  a 
j  atyms  a\m  connected  with  said  diaphragm  eccentrically 
|  thereof,  V>stahtially  as  described. 

3  2>  l\a  device  of  the  olass  described,  the 

j!  combination  Xth  a  diaphragm  and  a  support  therefor, 
j  0f  a  stylus  aA  secured.,  to" said  support  and  connected 
|  with  said  fiiaphLpn  eccentrically  thereof,  and  a  stylus 
|  mounted  in  aaidaV  opposite  the  centre  of  said  diaphragm, 
j.  substantially  as  ascribed. 

j  a.  In  a  deviAof  the  class  described,  the  com- 

S  hination  with  a  diaphAgm  and  a  support  therefor,  of  a 
j  flexible  stylus  arm  rig W secured  to  said  support  and 
j  connected  wich  said  diaphragm  eccentrically  thereof, 
ji  substantially  as  describedX 

ij  4.  in  a  device  of  the\lass  .described,  the  com- 

i  blnatlon  .1th  »  di.phras.  ani  V  »upp°rt  tt.ptfor,  °f  * 
i  fltlhl.  stylus  am  rlslSly  *•  «n»rt  ““ 


"S' 


jj  connected,  with  said  diaphragm  soooa  trio  ally  thereof,  and 
|  a  stylus  mounted  in  said  arm  opposite  the  oontre  of  said 


|i  diaphrak 


,  substantially  as  described. 


device  of  the  class  described,  the  com¬ 
bination  w-1  th  a  diaphragm  and  a  support  therefor,  of  a 
stylus  armXand  a  yielding  ndn-metailio  member  interposed 
between  said\arm  and  said  diaphragm  at  a  position  eccen¬ 
trically  of  ukd  diaphragm,  substantially  as  described. 


(k  In  a  device  of  the  class  described,  the  com- 
|!  bination  with  a  diaphragm  and  a  support  therefor,  of  a 
I  flexible  stylus  arm,  rigidlyjiecured  to  said  support, 

I!  and  a  yielding  non- metal  lie  meifeer  .interposed  between 
■j  said  arm  and  said  diaphragm  at  a  position- -eccentrically 
|  of  said  diaphragm,  substantially  ae  described. 


u  £i ,\A,ci^UeC  ‘ t/3/1 

In  a  device  of  the  class  described,  the 

blnati\i  with  a  diaphragt 


II  \ 

||  stylus  aW  rigidly  secured  to 


support  therefor ,  of  a 
ipport  adj 


the 


;|  periphery 'W  said  diaphragm  and  connected  with  said  dia- 
|  phragm  eccentrically  thereof,  the  said  arm  being  of 
jl  reduced  c:ror\ section  intermediate  its  ends,  substantially 
ji  as  described. 

V 

ll  8.  in  a  device  of  the  class  described.,  tha  < 

j!  hi  nation  with  a  dfaphragra  and  a  support,- therefor ,  of  a 
l-metallic  stylu^arm  rigidly  poured,  to  eaid  support 
adjacent  the  periphery  of  said  diaphragm  and  connected 
with  said  diaphragm  eccentrically  thereof,  the  said  arm 
being  of  reduced  cr'oss  Section  intermediate  its  ends, 


substantially  as  described. 


In  a  device  of  the  class  described,  the 
oombiruat^on  with  a  diaphragm,  and  a  support  therefor, 
of  a  stylus,  arm  rigidly  secured  to-  said  support  adjacent 
the  peripheryNof  said  diaphragm,  the  said  arm  being  of 
reduced  cross  action  intermediate  its  ends  and  a  yielding 
non-metallic  raember\^nterposed  between  said  arm  and  said 
diaphragm  at  a  positio'n^eccentrically  of  said  diaphragm, 
substantially  as  described. 

10/t,f  in  a  device  of  the  class  described,  the  com¬ 
bination  with  a  diaphragm,  and  a  support  therefor,  of 
a  stylus  arm  rigidly  secured  to  said  support  adjacent  the 
periphery  of  said  diaphragm,  the  said  arm  being  of  re¬ 
duced  cross  section  intermediate  its  ends,\a  yielding 
non-metallic  member  interposed  between  said  ana  and  said 
diaphragm  at  a  position  eccentrically  of  said  diaphragm, 
and  a  stylus  mounted  in  said  arm  opposite  the  centre^ of 
said  diaphragm,  substantially  as  described. 

device  of  the  class  described,  the 
binatioh  with  a  diaphragm  and  a  support  therefor,  of  a 
stylus  arm\of  gradually  increasing  width  in  a  direction 
transverse  to\the  record  groove,  the  said  arm  being  se¬ 
cured  at  its  broad  end  to  said  support  and  connected  near 
its  other  end  witlNgaid  diaphragm,  substantially  as 
described. 


f 


/-  7 


®!jis!  specification  signeb  anb  tuitneSSeb  tljis  ^  j  ^bap  of  ^^=^19 1'' 
^  <&e&*wvT- 

UllitneSSetlj: 

. 


2  A**y«S., . . 

©atb. 


g>tate  of  Jicbj  JcrScp  ] 

Countp  of  €ssex  [ 

tkomas  a.  rax  son,  tljc  abobe  nameb 
petitioner,  being  buly  Stuorn,  bcpoSeS  aub  SapS  tljat  Ije  is  a  citizen  of  tlje  Uniteb 
States,  anb  a  resibent  Of  Llev/ellyn  Park,  West  Orange ,  'F.sacx  County, 
New  Jersey, 

tijat  Ije  berily  beliebcs  fjimSelf  to  be  tfje  original,  first  anb  Sole  inbentor  of  tlje 
improbements  in  sound  hox.es 


beScribeb  anb  claimeb  in  tlje  annexcb  specification ;  tljat  Ije  boes  not  Imoto  anb 
boeS  not  beliebe  tljat  tlje  same  boas  eber  Unobm  or  useb  before  Ijis  inbention  or 
biscoberp  tljereof;  or  patenteb  or  beScribeb  in  anp  printeb  publication  in  tfjc 
Uniteb  states  of  America  or  anp  foreign  cotmtrp  before  Ijis  inbention  or 
biscoberp  tljereof,  or  more  tljan  ttuo  pears  prior  to  tljis  application;  or  patenteb 
in  anp  countrp  foreign  to  ttje  Uniteb  States  on  an  application  fileb  more  tljan 
ttoelbe  tnontljs  prior  to  tljis  application;  or  itt  public  use  or  on  sale  in  tlje 
Uniteb  States  for  more  tljan  lboo  pears  prior  to  tljis  application;  anb  tljat  no 
application  for  patent  upon  saib  inbention  IjaS  been  fileb  bp  Ijim  or  Ijis  legal 
representatibes  or  assigns  in  anp  foreign  countrp. 

\/j£"***  '■''O  - 

g>b)orn  to  anb  SubScribeb  before  me  tljis-?-5’  ^bap  / 

ft. 

iiotarp  public. 


[£*>eal] 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 
UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 
WASHINGTON  1 

Thomas)  A.  Edison, 

Cure  -’Tank  7..  Dyer, 

Ornnro,  ”ew  ~*rwy  . 


25, 


,7  911  . 


Please  find  below  a  communication  from  the.  EX  AH  I  HER  in  charge  of  your  application. 

for  Hound  boxes,  filed  March  24 ,1911 ,  serial  number  616,756  . 


The  blanks  left  on  page  1  should  he  filled  In  with  the 
proper  serial  number  and  date  • 

Claim  1  is  rejected  upon  any  of  the  following  references: 
'tort, May  5,1908,  #727, 357} 
v/ohor.t'ejf  88,1905,  #790,542^’ 

Hibbard, Oot.  17,1905,  #808,818,  all  in  (if-'l-lO ,  also  see 

Moyer , cept .  25, 1900, #658,571,  and 

Woroross,.Tune  11, 1901, #676, 270,  both  in  (181-10). 

To  Invention  can  he  found  in  extending  the  stylus  arm  of  either 
Edison, -eh.  22,1910,  #950,226,  or  Edison,. Tune  21 ,1910, #962, 081, 
both  in  (181-10),  or  Chisholm, March  10,1906, #681,546,  (lfil-lO ,  so 
ob  to  attach  it  eccentrically  to  tbs  diaphragm  as  in  the  references 
cited,  leaving  the  stylus  intermediate  the  ends  of  +ho  stylus  arm, 
a  construction  very  common  in  xMs  art  as  see  Maodonald,  ’-.ay  2,1899, 
"624,059, (181-10)  and  accordingly  claims  2,  3,  and  4  are  rejected- 
Claim  5  is  rejected  upon  tho  reasons  of  rejection  of 
claim  1,  in  viev;  of  Edison, reby.  5, 1889, #397, 200,  (lCl-lO) ,  as 
showing  tho  cork  attaching  means  . 

Claim  6  is  rejected  upon  the  reasons  of  rejection  of 
claims  2  to  4, in  viev/  of  Edison,  last  cited. 

Claims  7  and  8  are  rejected  upon  the  reasons  of  rejection 


it' 

#610,756 . 2. 

of  ill  ;tiai  2,  in  vie*  of  Rand  all,  AuK.  1,  M9S,  #602,383,  (lRl-8), 
bb  phowine  the  sfcylus  arm  of  reduced:  cross  seotion  intermediate 
it rs  ends. 

rir.'.nR  9  and  10  are  rejected  upon  the  reasons  of 
rejection  of  o' aim  2,  in  view  of  Edison,  Inst  cited  and  Randall  • 
No  Invention  can  he  found  in  combining  tl-ftse  features  in  one  sound 
hox. 

Claim  11  is  rejected  upon  Kart, -Tune  6, 1900, #651, 308, 
or  TM i son , #962 , 081 ,  cited,  both  in  (181-10). 


I! 


I  IN  THE  V N I TED 

ji 

jj  Thomas  A,  Edison 
jj  SOf’HD  BOXES 
jj  Filed  March  24,  1211 
|  Serial  No.  616,756 

j  HONORABLE  COMMISSIONER  OF  PATENTS, 
j  S  I  ft: 

!  Replying  to  Office  action  of 

j  April  25,  1211,  pleace  amend  the  above  entitled  caoo  ae 
li  follows: 


STATES  PATENT  OFFICE. 

) 

:  Room  No.  370 
) 

) 


In  line  20,  page  1,  after  "No."  insert 

-  616,755;  and  at  the  beginning  of  line  21,  same  page, 
inocrt-Maroh  24,  1911-. 

In  line  1,  page  4,  after  "diaphragm",  insert 

-  at  a  point  -j  and  in  line  13,  same  page,  change  "may" 
to  -  is  -,  and  canoel  "be". 

Cancel  claims  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  7,  8,  and  11,  and 
change  the  numerals  of  claims  6,  9,  and  10  to  -  9,  10,  and 
11  -  respectively. 

Add  the  following  ae  claims  1  to  8,  inclusive: 


1.  In  a  device  of  the  class  described,  the  oom- 
binatioh-vQf  a  sound  box  body,  a  single  diaphragm  mounted 
therein,  a  stylujs,  and  moans  for  transmitting  the  movomentsj 
of  the  said  stylus  ^td\qoid  diaphragm,  said  means  bearing 

upon  said  diaphragm  substantially  at  a  single  point 
eooentrioally  of  said  diaphragm,  substantially  as  de¬ 
scribed. 


3  In  a  device  of  the  olaea  described, 
bination  of  a  sound  box  body,  a  single  diaphragm  mouh-t^d 
therein,  and  a  stylus  arm  conneoted  eith  said  diaphragm 
1. 


s 


'Ifce.t.L  tj/-  ^ ^ 

substantially  at  a...  single  point  eoocntrically  of  said 
diaphragm,  substantially  as  described. 

3,\  In  a  devioe  of  the  class  dcooribed,  the  oom- 


therein,  add  a  flexible  stylus 


single  diaphragm  mounted 
rrn  secured  to  said  body 


mneotek  with  said  diaphragm  substantially  at  a  singljs 
eccentrically  of  said  diaphragm,  substantially  as  j 


bination  of  a  sound  box  body,  a  single  diaphragm  mounted 
therein,  a  stylus  arm  Opnnected  with  said  diaphragm 
substantially  at  a  single  point  eccentrically  of  said 
diaphragm,  and  a  stylus  motinted  in  said  arm  opposite  the 
fientre  of  said  diaphragm,  substantially  as  described. 


5.  In  a  device  of  the  cl 


:  the  crass  described,  the  < 
body,  a  Single  diaphragm  mi 
; cured  to  e\id  body,  and  yii 


interposed  betv/een  said  £ 


therein,  a  stylus  arm  secured  to  sKid  body,  and  yielding 
moans  interposed  betv/een  said  arm  and^said  diax'hragm 
and  bearing  upon  said  diaphragm  substantially  at  a  single 
point  eccentrically  thereof,  substantially  as  described. 

6.  In  a  devioe  of  the  class  described,  the  com¬ 
bination  of  a  sound  box  body,  a  single  diaphragm  mounted 
therein,  and  a  non-metallio  ntyluo  arm  oonr.octed  with 
said  diaphragm  substantially  at  a  single  point  eccentri¬ 
cally  of  said  diaphragm,  substantially  as  described. 


7,  In  a  devioe  of  the  olaes  described,  the  ooV- 
bination  of  a  sound  box  body,  a  single  diaphragm  mounted 
therein,  a  non-metallio  stylus  arm  secured  to  eaid  body\ 
and  yielding  means  interposed  between  said  arm  and  said 
diaphragm  and  bearing  upon  said  diaphragm  substantially 


1 


&txa  single  point  ecoentrioally  thereof,  substantially 
a: 


devioo  of  the  clean  described,  tho  com¬ 
bination  of  a  souhd^box  tody,  a  single  diaphragm  mounted 
therein,  a  flexible  notHmetallio  stylus  arm  secured  to 
said  body,  and  yielding  meantKinterpoaed  between  said 
arm  and  said  diaphragm  and  fcearinfj^pon  said  diaphragm 
substantially  at  a  single  point  eccentrically  thereof, 
substantially  as  described.  - 

P.  E  S  A  R  X  8 


I: 


j 

| 


! 


Hone  of  the  references  of  record  chows  a  sound  j 
box  having  a  single  diaphragm  mounted  therein  and  means  ; 
bearing  upon  or  connected  with  the  diaphragm  substantially 
at  a  single  point  eccentrically  thereof  for  transmitting 
the  movements  of  tho  stylus  to  the  diaphragm.  In  the 
disclosure  of  Hart  there  is  a  total  absence  of  applicant's 
inventive  conception  of  applying  the  connections  between 
the  stylus  lever  and  the  diaphragm  to  auoh  a  point  on  the 
diaphragm  as  to  throw  the  diaphragm  out  of  tune  with 
particular  notes.  Hart's  object  was  to  produce  a  re¬ 
producer  having  a  plurality  of  diaphragms  and  a  stylus  for 
eaoh  diaphragm,  and  in  order  to  connect  each  stylus  with 
its  diaphragm,  he  employs  a  number  of  oonneotionB,  some 
of  whioh  he  must  put  slightly  off  the  centre.  Obviously, 
Hart  intended  to  place  the  oonneotions  SI?  and  33?  aB  near 
the  centre  of  the  diaphragm  as  posoible,  and  tlpeBe  con  - 
nections  are,  in  fact,  shown  very  near  the  centres  of  the 
diaphragms.  Claims  1  to  8  structurally  differentiate 
from  the  patent  to  Hart  by  specifying  a  sound  box  body 
and  a  single  diaphragm  mounted  therein.  With  the  oom- 


3. 


ij  bincsd  arrangement  of  the  diaphragms  disclosed  by  Hart, 
jj  the  nooustieevta«°of  a  device  like  that  Bet  forth  in  the 
|  ola.ims  o<  ul  d  not  be  obtained.  T^c  maximum  effeot  in 
ji  reproduction  obtained  from  the  various  diaphragms  in 
ji  Hart's  dovioe  is  that  of  the  upper  diaphragm  which  has 
'j  its  stylus  connection  looated  at  its  centre,  and  is  j 

I  therefore  subject  to  the  objections  which  it  was  appli- 

1!  I 

jj  oant'o  object  to  obviate.  The  quality  of  the  sound  waves  , 

ij  resulting  from  the  three  diaphragms  in  Hart's  reproducer 
j  would  accordingly  be  inferior  to  that  of  the  reproduction 
|  from  applicant's  device.  Furthermore,  it  is  peipted  out 
i  that  with  Hart's  plurality  of  styluses,  it  would  be  im- 
■  possible  to  obtain  perfectly  synchronous  vibration  in  all  j 
jj  the  diaphragms;  so  that  the  vibrations  of  one  diaphragm 
jj  would  interfere  with  those  of  the  others,  and  an  imperfect 
jj  reproduction  would  result.  The  patents  to  Weber  and  Hibbanl 
do  not  show  the  stylus  arm  applied  to  the  diaphragm  oub- 
!  stantially  at  a  single  point. 

In  the  structure  of  Moyer,  a  rigid  oonical  body 
C.  is  employed  in  place  of  a  stylus  lever.  This  oonical 
jj  body  vibrates  about  the  edge  thereof  adjacent  the  periphery 
|j  of  the  diaphragm  as  a  fulcrum  and  imparts  the  maximum 
jj  vibration  to  the  diaphragm  substantially  at  the  centre 
ji  thereof.  A  large  part  of  the  diaphragm  is  held  rigid, 
and  the  vibration  thereof  is  obviously  essentially  different 
|j  from  that  produced  when  tho  oonneotiona  from;  the  stylus 
are  applied  to  the  diaphragm" substantially  at  a  single 
point  ecoentaioally  of  said  diaphragm". 

The  structure  of  HorcrosB  is  similar  to  that  of 
Moyer,  and  fails  to  anticipate  applicant's  stricture  for 
the  same  reasons  as  does  Moyer's. 


4. 


j;  No  other  references  of  reoord  discloDCG  a  otyluo 

||  connected  to  the  diaphragm  eccentrically  thereof;  and  | 
ola ia s  1  to  8  arc  accordingly  thought  to  be  patentable.  i 
\  Referring  to  claims  0,  10,  and  11,  none  of  the 

!j  references  discloses  a  sty'luo  arm  rigidly  secured  to  the 
|j  diaphragm  support,  and  a  yielding  non-matall ic  member  in- 
1  terposed  between  said  arm  and  diaphragm.  addition  to 
j!  absorbing  the  minute  scratching  vibrations,  this  yielding 
|  member  in  applicant's  device  permits  a  slight  variation 
i;  between  the  relative  angular  positions  of  the  portions  of  , 
I  the  stylus  arm  and  diaphragm  between  which  it  ia  interposed' 
||  without  danger  of  breaking  the  connection  between  these 
jj  parts.  This  yielding  member  ia,  therefore,  vssa  in  a 
I;  relation  very  different  from  that  of  the  cork  piece  a 
shown  in  the  patent  to  Edison,  Kcu  397,230,  in  •■/Inch 
jj  patent  the  stylus  arm  instead  of  being  connected  to  tne 
|  sound  box  body,  is  pivotally  supported  on  said  cork  piece. 

I  Furthermore,  none  of  the  references  shows  a  stylus  arm 
j!  rigidly  ^secured  to  the  diaphragm  support  and  derating 
j  upon  the  diaphragm,  at  a  position  eccentrically  of  the 
j  latter.  Claim  11  also  distinguishes  from  the  references 
I]  by  specifying  that  the  ctyluo  ia  opposite  the  centre  of 
ij  the  diaphragm  while  the  stylus  arm  is  connected  with  the 

i  diaphragm  eccentrioally  thereof. 

None  of  the  references  discloses  applicant's 
1  invention  nor  ar.y  equivalent  combination,  ard  it  is  sub- 
I  mitted  that  the  assembling  and  modification  of  various 
jl  elements  from  the  references  of  reoord  to  produce  appli 
j  oant's  invention,  as  set  forth  in  the  claims  in  question, 
oould  not  be  accomplished  without  a  knowledge  of  appli¬ 
cant's  disclosure  or  the  exercise  of  the  invention- 


5. 


; 


Reconsideration  and 
respectfully  requested. 


Orange,  View  Jersey 
April  3,  3  013 


allowance  are  accordingly 
THOMAS  A.  EDISON 

hie  Attorney. 


ji 

| 


-33  Room - 579 


^^Popor  N&jKeJ.* 


42S 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 


UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 

WASHINGTON  May  8,1912. 


Thomas  A.  Edison, 

Care  Frank  1.  Dyer, 

orange,  Mew  Jersey  . 


D.S.  PATPT  OFFICE, 

MAY  8  1912 

MAILED. 


ise  find  below  a  communication  from  the  EXAMINER  in  charge  of  your  application. 

for  Sound  Boxes, filed  March  24, 1911, serial  number  616,756 


This  action  1b  responsive  to  the  amondmont  filed  April  4, 

1912. 

ClaimB  1  and  2  are  rejected  upon  Williams, vuroh  21,1911, 
fr 907,205,  (181-ll)i  Tainter.May  4,1886,  #341,288,  (181-2), see 
Figure  11  and  also  as  displaying  no  invention  over  Mart  of 
record.  Invention  is  not  found  in  employing  only  one  of 
irart'B  diaphragms  with  the  stylus  bar  connection  disclosed. 

Claim  3  ir.  rejected  upon  any  of  the  above  cited  references. 
Invention  ia  not  found  in  making  the  stylus  arm  flexible  as 
such/1  a  a  well  known  construction^  see  Murray, July  16,1907 y/ 
#860,604,  (181-11);  Edison,  #962,081  ^  record;  Bdi son, #950, 226 
of  record;  Jones, April  19, 1898, #602, 453,  (ltyl-ll) }  Randall  of  record 
or  Lumiore  Eng.  putent,Mov.  16, 1909, #26, 613,  (181-11). 

Claim  4  is  rejeoted  upon  Talnter,  oited,  oIbo  aB 
displaying  no  invention  over  the  art  disclosed,  no  invention  being 
found  in  connecting  the  stylus  arm  of  Haodonald  of  record 
eooentrioally  with  rospect  to  the  diaphragm  v/ith  the  stylus 
opposite  the  center,  in  view  of  Tainter's  disclosure  or  Williams, 
disclosure. 

Claim  5  is  rejeoted  upon  Tainter;  also  upon  Hart  or  Williams 
in  view  of  any  construction  showing  the  interposition  of  yielding 


#616,756- 


meana  'between  the  stylua  arm  and  the  diaphragm.  Such  aa  shown 
for  example  In  J^nea.Hay  31, 1890, #604, 829,  (101-3)}  Berliner, *eb. 
19,1895,  #5 34, #43,  (101-3)-}  Berliner, ,  July  28,1090,  #564, SB6, 
(181-3)}  Kraemor, April  21, 1908, #885, too-,  Cheney, April  7,1903, 
#724,435^both  in  (181-11)}  Hlll.mib.  19,1901,  #668,183,  (181-10), 
or  Edison, #397, 280,  of  record. 

Claim  6  ia  rejected  upon  the  roferenooa  cited  against  dlaim 
1,  in  view  of  any  v/ooden  stylua  am  aa  in  the  two  Edison 
references  first  cited  oiy  the  disclosure  by  W.  B.  Stout  in  an 
article  entitled  "Uow  to  Make  a  Gramophone"  in  the  Soient.ifio 
American  of  April  27,1901. 

Claims  7  and  8  ore  rejected  upon  the  references  and  reasona 
of  rejection  of  claim  6  in  view  of  the  references  oited  against 

claim  5  as  showing  the  yielding  means  interposed. 

rejected  . 

Claims  9,  10  and  11  aroj^upon  the  references  oited  against 

claim  1,  in  view  of  any  of  the  references  showing  flexible 
arms  and  any  of  the  references  showing  interposed  non  motalio 


members 


JIT  Jim  UHIIED  S2ASE3  PAJHIIT  OPEICB. 

thohas  a.  e  pi  3  oh , 

iSOUTTE  BOXES, 

Filed  liar  oil  24,  1911 
Serinl  Ho.  616,756. 

Honor.  AiiiE  com:  is  si  oh  he  or  patemjs, 

S  I  H: 

In  response  to  the  Office  action  of  Hay  0, 
1912,  please  amend  the  above  ontitled  case  aof allows : 

In  lino  12,  page  3,  after  "of"  insert 
_  non-raotallic  material,  such  as  -  ;  and  in  line  lo ,  same 
page,  after  "wood"  insert  a  comma  (,)  . 

Cancel  nil  of  the  claims  and  insert  the 
following  now  claims : 

1.  In  n  device  of  the  class  describe-!;!,  the  com¬ 
bination  of  a  di up hr a; ra,  a  stylus  arm  connected  with  said 
diaphragm  at  a  position  occontrioally  of  tho  diaphragm, 
and  means  coasting  with  arid  arm  at  a  second  position  to 
support  the  same,  said  arm  being  provided  -with  stylus 
supporting  means  intermediate  said  positions,  substantially 
as  doscribod. 

2.  In  a  device  of  tho  class  doscribod,  the  com¬ 
bination  of  a  sound  box  body,  a  diaphragm  mounted  therein, 
and  a  styluc  arm  supported  by  said  sound  box  body  ut  a 
givor,  position  and  connected  v/ith  said  diaphragm  at  a 
eocond  position  eccentrically  of  tho  diaphragm,  said  arm 
boing  provided  with  stylus  supporting  means  intermediate 
said  positions,  substantially  as  described. 


Hoom  Ho.  379. 


3.  In  a  device  of  tho  olnso  described,  the  com¬ 
bination  of  a  sound  box  body,  n  diaphragm  mounted  thoroin, 
end  a  yielding  stylus  arm  rigidly  secured  to  said  Bound 
box  body  at  u  given  position  and  connected  with  said 
diaphragm  at  a  second  position  eccentrically  of  tho  dia¬ 
phragm  ,  audit  arm  boing  provided  with  ntyluo  supporting 
moans  intermediate  said  positions,  substantially  as 

do  scribed . 

4.  In  a  device  of  the  class  described,  tho  com¬ 
bination  of  a  diaphragm,  o  non-metallic  stylus  arm  con¬ 
nected  with  said  diaphragm  at  u  position  eccentrically 
of  tho  diaphragm,  and  means  ooueting  with  said  arm  at 

a  second  position  to  s\ipport  tho  name,  said  arm  being 
providod  with  styluo  supporting  moans  intermediate  said 
positions,  substantially  as  described. 

5.  In  a  dovioo  of  the  class  described,  tho  com¬ 
bination  of  a  diaphragm,  a  stylus  arm  having  a  yiolding 
connection  with  said  diaphragm  at  a  position  eccentrically, 
of  the  diaphragm,  and  moans  eoaoting  with  said  arm  at 

a  second  position  to  support  tho  sai'.o,  said  arm  being 
providod  with  stylus  supporting  moans  in  to  mod -into  said 
positions,  substantially  as  doscribod. 

6.  In  a  dovioo  of  tho  class  described,  tho  com¬ 
bination  of  a  diaphragm,  a  stylus  arm  connected  with  said 
diaphragm  at  a  position  oocontrically  of  tho  diaphragm, 
and  meanB  ooaating  with  said  arm  at  a  second  posit' on  to 
support  the  same,  said  arm  being  provided  with  stylus 
supporting  means  intermediate  said  positions  and  sub¬ 
stantially  opposite  the  conter  of  said  diaphragm,  sub- 
stantially  as  dosoribod. 


7.  In  n  'Sovieti  of  tho  oIobb  dosoribod,  tho  com¬ 
bination  of  a  sound  box  body,  a  diaphragm  mounted  therein, 
and  n  yielding  stylus  arm  rigidly  soourod  to  sold  sound 
box  body  at  a  given  position  and  connected  with  oaid 
diaphragm  u.t  a  second  position  eooontrically  of  the  dia¬ 
phragm  ,  said  arm  being  provided  with  stylus  supporting 
moans  intermediate  said  positions  and  substantially 
opposite  the  center  of  said  diaphragm,  substantially 
as  described. 


V.  K  M  i  3  K  S 


Some  of  tho  rejected  claims  are  thought  not 

to  havo  boen  anticipated  by  tho  roforencos  of  record, 

but  nn  ontdroly  now  sot  of  claims  is  presented  herewith 

in  ordor  to  more  dourly  define  tho  patontablo  features 

of  applicant's  invention.  All  of  the  claims  as  now 

presented  differentiate  from  tho  roforencos  by  specifying 

that  the  stylus  arm  is  ecoontribally  connected  with  tho 

diaphragm  and  is  provided  with  stylus  supporting  moans 

intermediate  the  positions  at  which  it  is  supported  and 

connected  with  tho  diaphragm.  With  this  construction 

improved  results  havo  boon  obtained  by  the  applicant  in 

the  reduction  of  tho  prominence  of  ob jootionablo  high  und 

low  notes  und  in  the  increase  of  tho  loudnoss  of  the  ro- 
advantages  oftho 

production.  For  a  statement  of  tho/oombinations  sot 
forth  in  tho  claims,  the  Examiner's  attention  is  diroctod 
to  pago  4  of  tho  specification. 

Applicant  has  produced  an  improvod  device  not 


discloaod  or  suggoaton  by  the  roforonooa  and  rooonfiidcrtitio^ 
and  allowance  are  accordingly  reapootfully  recreated. 

Houpoctfully  BUbnibtod, 

THOMAiWw  EDI  1301 J, 

3v  ' 


hia  Attorney. 


Oronge,  Hew  Joracy, 
April  /yj  1013 . 


Dlv. .23- Boom.... 3-7-9 


paper  N^-ftej-;-- 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 

UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 

WASHINGTON  . „ 


Srank  L.  Dyer, 

...Orange  ,..New~  Jars 


Please  find  below  a  communication  from  the  EXAMINER  in  charge  of  the  application  of 

-ThonaB  -A».-3SfliBon,-BRPi-al-mua>50P-i514,-7S«,-fil-eA-MarQlt.-34j:l&ll=H  - 


U.S.  PATENT  OFFICE, 

MAY  13.10?.;  I 

MAIL  E  D. 


This  aotion  ia  responsive  to  the  amendment  filed  April  16, 

1913  . 

ClaimB  1  and ^Jl  are  rejected  on  Ohelt, English  patent, 

Jan.  29,1897,  #2430,(181-10). 

As  it  is  shown  old  to  oonneot  the  Btylus  arm  eccentrically 
to  the  diaphragm  in  references  of  record  as-  for  example, 

Tainter,  #341,288 Sr  HiVbard, #802 ,212, &  or  Williams,  no  invention 
is  found  in  so  connecting  the  stylus  arm  in  any  of  the  sound 
hoxeB  oited  of  record  employing  the  type  of  arm  illustrated 
in  Maodonald,#624 , 059  of  record;  also  no  invention  is  found  in 
substituting  such  type  of  arm  as  illustrated  in  Maodonald 
in  any  of  the  first,  group1  of  references.  Accordingly,  olaims  1 
and  2  are  additionally  rejected  for  such  reasons. 

Claim  3  is  rejected  on  the  references  and  reasons  above 
given.  The  flexible  arm  rigidly  held  at  one  end  ftB  shown  .in 
Tainter  aB  well  as  in  other  references  of  reoord  as  Randall. 

Claim  4  is  rejected  on  the  references  and  reasons  oited 
against  claim  1  .  No  invention  is  found  in  making  the  arm  of 
wood  as  suoh  is  shown  in  the  references  of  record  as  Edison, 
#962,081. 


#61(5,756- 


■2. 


Claim  5  is  rejected  on  the  references  and  reasons  of 
rejection  of  claim  1.  No  invention  is  found  in  providing 
the  yielding  connection  with  the  diaphragm  us  such  is  shown 
common  in  references  of  record  as  Tainter, above  cited. 

Claim  6  is  rejected  on  Obelt,  also  on  Tuinter  or  Hibbard, 
it  not  being  Been  as  patentably  rauterial  on  which  side  of  the 
center  of  the  diaphragm  the  arm  is  attached.  The  result 
described  by  applicant  would  Been  to  be  the  same  . 

Claim  7  is  rejected  on  the  references  and  reasons  last 
given  in  view  of  the  considerations  fully  set  out  above. 


Patent  Series 
Patent  Application  Files 

Folio  #  721  Phonographic  Telegraphs 

Serial#:  616757 

Primary  Applicant:  Edison,  Thomas  A 
Date  Executed:  3/22/1911 


Applicant. 

...  •JltVVU&i . M- . . 

Address. 

Filed  Thasvods  Z  - 

Examiner’s  Room  No. . M..1 . 

Assignee . 

. Liber . Page . . 

Ass’g’t  Exec . Recorded . 

Patent  No. 

Issued^>^  . 

ACTIONS. 


^Petition 


tlje  Commissioner  of  patents!: 

gour petitionee  thomas  a.  Edison 

a  citi?en  of  tlje  ©niteb  States,  reSibing  anb  fjabing  a  $oSt  ©ffice  abbress  at 
Llewellyn  Park  ,  West  Orange,  Essex  County,  Hew  Jersey 


praps  tfjat  letters  patent  map  be  granteb  to  Ijim  for  tlje  improbements  in 


-  PHONOGRAPHIC  TELEGRAPHS - 


get  fortlj  in  tlje  annexeb  Specification ;  anb  tjc  ijerebp  appoints  Jfranb  3L  ©per 
(Registration  J2o.  560),  of  ©range,  if?eto  JerSep,  Ijis  attornep,  toitlj  full 
potoer  of  substitution  anb  reboeation,  to  prosecute  tljis  application,  to  mafee 
alterations  anb  amenbments  tijerein,  to  receibe  tlje  patent,  anb  to  transact  all 
business  in  tlje  patent  ©fficc  connected  tfjeretoitfj. 


SJ'BOIJIOATXOS, 


!  TO  ALL  WHOM  XT  MAY  CONCER1T:  | 

!  BE  IT  KNOWN,  that  X,  THOMAS  A.  TO: SOM,  a  citizen  j 

j  of  the  United  States  and  s.  resident  of  Llewellyn  Park,  | 

!  West  Orange,  in  the  County  of  Essex  and  State  of  Mew  j 

Jersey,  have  invented  certain  new  and  useful  improvements  I 
i  in  PHONO "P  APHI C  TELEGBAPIS of  which  the  following  is  a 
j  description: 

MY  invention  relates  to  the  transmission  of  j 

messages  to  distant  points,  and  has  for  its  object  the  j 
provision  of  an  improved  method  and  means  whereby  such 
messagesmay  be  transmitted  at  a  high  speed, 

MY  invention  is  particularly  applicable  to 
iltelegraph  and  similar  systems  where,  because  of  the 
ilimited  speed  at  which  an  operator  is  able  to  receive  the 
message,  the  capacity  of  the  line  is  restricted.  Xn  con¬ 
formity  with  my  object,  I  provide  means  whereby  a  record 
!  of  the  message  may  be  made  at  a  high  speed  at  the  receiving 
’  station,  and  then  reproduced  at  any  desired  slower  speed, 
i  In  the  particular  embodiment  of  my  invention  shown  and 
j  described  herein,  I  transmit  the  message  telegraphically 
!  to  the  distant  station,  where  the  electric  pulsations 
i  transmitted  along  the  line  are  transformed  into  mechanical 
|  pulsations,  which  latter  are  recorded. upon- a  phonograph 
record  blank.  With  this  construction,  it  is  possible  to 
transmit  the  characters  representing  the  message  along  the 


i  line  and  to  record  the  same  on  the  record  "blank  at  ae 
high  a  speed  as  300  words  per  minute.  .  The  resultant 
:  !  record  may  at  any  time  he  reproduced  at  a  speed  permitting 
j  !  the  operator  to  easily  understand  the  same. 

In  order  that  my  invention  may  he  better  under¬ 
stood,  attention  is  hereby  directed  to  the  accompanying 
.  drawing ,  forming  a  part  of  this  specification,  and  showing 
!  a  diagrammatic  view  of  a  telegraph  system  embodying  my 
!  invention. 

P.of  orring  t0  drawing,  1  represents  the  main 
line  which  is  supplied  with  current  from  a  generator  or  any 
other  suitable  source  2  and  is  grounded  at  the  transmitting 
and  reoeiving  ends,  as  at  £  and  4  respectively.  The 
numeral  jj  represents  a  transmitter,  comprising  a  metal 
cylinder  £  rotated  by  any  suitable  means  (not  shown)  and 
a  oontaot  brush  £  adapted  to  engage  the  periphery  of  the 
cylinder.  As  shown  in  the  drawing,  the  current  of  the 
main  line  is  supplied  to  the  cylinder  6  by  a  brush  8  en¬ 
gaging  the  shaft  £  of  the  oylinder.  A  non-oonducting 
tape  10  having  perforations  therein  corresponding  to  the 
oharaoters  representing  the  message  to  be  sent  is  fad 
i  over  the  oylinder  6  past  the  brush  £;  so  that  when  the  sai<. 

brush  engages  the  cylinder  through  the  perforations  in  the 
I  tape,  pulsations  are  thereby  set  up  in  the  main  line 
corresponding  to  the  message  to  be  sent.  Any  other  pre¬ 

ferred  transmitter  may  he  substituted  for  that  shown  and 
described  above. 

The  reoeiving  instrument  preferably  employed  »yr 

rn/'f 

we-  comprises  a  diaphragm  11  secured  to  any  suitable 


support  12  and  adapted  to  transform  the  electrical  pul- 
sations  from  the  sending  station  into  corresponding  .  j 
mechanical  pulsations  or  vibrations  and  to  transmit  them  |j 
to  a  stylus  13  whereby  they  are  recorded  upon  a  rotating  \l 
record  cylinder  of  wax-like  material  14.  The  stylus  13  j 

is  mounted  in  a  lever  li'pivoted  to  a  floating  weight  15  j 

which  is  pivoted  to  the  support  12,  so  that  it  is  held  in  ; 
engagement  with  the  cylinder  14  with  a  substantially  | 

uniform  pressure  regardless  of  any  unevenness  or  eccen-  | 
tricity  in  the  surface  of  the  cylinder.  An  electromagnet  | 
j  16  having  a  core  17  is  placed  in  the  main  line  circuit  at  j 
the  receiving  station  and  is  adapted  to  vibrate  the  dia-  j 

phragm  11  in  accordance  with  the  current  pulsations  in  j 

the  said  circuit.  A  permanent  magnet  18  is  secured  to  | 
the  core  of  the  electromagnet  and  tends  to  hold  the  dia-  | 
phragm  in  its  normal  position.  In  order  to  sharpen  the  1  | 

record',  1  place  a  condenser  10  in  the  main  line  circuit  ! 

!  at  the  receiving  end  to  prevent  continuous  leakage  of  j 

currents  from  stressing  the  diaphragm  of  the  receiving  ,  j 

|  instrument .  j 

j:  X  have  found  that  the  sharpness  of  the  record  j 

j  is  materially  Increased  by  the  provision  of  an ^auxiliary  .  j 
I  circuit  20  containing.a  «Bn.t(ai  and Y resistance  22  to  j 
I!  regulate  the  current.  This  circuit,  as  shown,  is  con-  | 

\  nected  with  the  main  line  circuit  in  advance  of  the  gener-  ; 
j  ator  8  and  also  beyond  the  transmitter.  The  resistance  22  j 
|  as  shown  preferably  comprises  two  lamps  connected  in  multi- i 
j  pie  and  placed  in  the  auxiliary  circuit;  These  lamps  bal- 
j  anoe  the  current  flowing  through  the  coil  21  by  taking  up 
|  •  more  or  less  of  the  current  according  to  the  variations 
|  therein.  The  arrangement  desorlbed  above  is  such  that 
|  when  the  am  7  is  engaged  with  the  cylinder  6,  the  current  j 


I  having  passed  through  the  transmitter  passes  part  to  the 
I  main  line  and  part  to  the  auxiliary  oirouit;  so  that 

when  the  oirouit  is  broken  by  the  transmitter,  the  reverse 
current  from  the  auxiliary  circuit  neutralizes  the  static 
charge  in  the  main  oirouit,  and  the  vibrations  imparted 
I  to  the  diaphragm  are  sharp  and  distinct, 
j  In  operating  the  apparatus  described  above,  it 

:|  is  possible  to  secure  a  clear  and  distinct  record  upon  the 
jj  cylinder  14  even  though  the  apparatus  be  worked  at  a_very 
high  speed;  so  that  the  line  has  a  very  high  oapaoity. 

|J  After  the  record  has  been  made,  it  may  be  reproduced  at 
jj  any  desired  speed  preferably  by  placing  the  record  cylinder 
|  on  an  auxiliary  phonograph  (not  shown)  provided  for  that 

(purpose. 

It  is  to  be  understood  that  my  invention  is 
not  limited  to  the  specific  embodiment  described  above, 
but  that  it  includes  all  the  modifications  falling  within 
I  the  Bcope  of  the  appended  claims. 


j  Having  now  described  my  invention,  what  y  claim 

!  as  new  and  desire  to  secure  hy  Letters  Patent  of  the 
united  States  is  as  follows: 

1.  The  method.  oi'„  U'unuj.ii  Uing  miiLuai^a  which  con¬ 
sists  ;  in  transmitting  pulsation's  or  vi¬ 

brations^  ,to  ^he  reo4iving  station  ata/high  speed, ^re-  ^ 
cording  the  said  puleations  at  the.  receiving  station,  and 
rhXi T^pf^uoJn^the  same  from  t>ieAreoord 

at  ‘E^redu^ed  speed,  substantially  as  described. 

iethod_of  transmitting  messages  which  con¬ 


sists  in  transmitting  € 


rctricalpulaations 


receiving  station  at  a  high  speed,  transforming  the 
!i  electrical  int'o~-mechanlcal  pulsations  at  the  receiving 
|j  station,  impressing  orrecordingthe  last  named  pul-  4 

|l  nations  [upon  a  suit  a  Die  blani,  an|  reproducing  the  same  k 
:|  from  the  resultant  record  at  aj/reducod  speed,  substantially 
/  *  "" 

|  as  described. 

!'  3-  The  method  of At3?a^Attin^'Ai^lag»&/ which  con- 

1  slots  in  providing  a  strip  with  perforations  corresponding 
!!  to  the  characters  representin^the— me^sa^e-  to  be  sent, 
ij  transmitting  electrical  pulsations  corresponding  to  the 


||  said  perforations  to  the  receiving  station  at  a  nigh 
;!  speed,  transforming  the  electrical  into  mechanical  pul- 
i|  sations  ,„  recording  the  last  named  pul- 

||  sations  upon  a-euitable  bta*&  -anS^pro^uolng  the  same 
!i  -from  the  resultant  reoord  at  a,redUoed  speed,  subatantially| 

,  ,  ,  .  V  *■/■■■/,  k 

i|  as  described.  1  1 

!|  '  tli; 

|  X  In  a  device  of  the  class  described,  a  circuit 

ji  containing  a  source  of  current  supply,  a  transmitter,  a 
|!  phonographic  receiver,  and  means  located  in  proximity  to 
j  said  rece^wr  for  preventing  leakage  of  current  thereto 
when  the  circuit  is  broken  by  said  transmitter,  sub- 
||  stant  ially  asVescribed . 

jj  5.  In  a  device  of  the  class  described,  a  circuit 

j|  containing  a  sour\n  of  current  supply,  and  a  transmitter,  a! 
j  phonographic  receiver,  and  a  condenser,  the  said  condenser 
j  being  located  in  saiXcircuit  intermediate  said  transmittei 
j  and  receiver  and  in  pr^imity  to  said  receiver,  substantial, 
j  ly  as  described. 


«5W 


In  a  aevloe  of  the  olass  aesoribod,  a  main 
I  oirouitYoontaining  a  souroo  of  our rent  supply,  a  trans¬ 
mitter  a\a  a  phonographio  receiver,  ana  an  auxiliary 
oirouit  pYovidea  with  inauotive  rooietanoe  oonneotea 
with  saia  main  oirouit  and  adapted.  to  neutralize  the 
statio  oharae  in  the  main  oirouit  when  tho  latter  is 
||  broten  by  th^  transmitter,  substantially  as  aosoribea. 

aovioe  of  the  'olass  described,  a  oirouit 
containing  a  sohroe  of  ourrent  supply,  a  transmitter  ana 
a  phonographio  rYoeiver  ana  a  magnet  shuntea  about  Baia 
souroe  of  ourrent\supply  ana  saia  transmitter,  substan¬ 
tially  as  describee. 

device  of  the  olass  aesoribea,  a  oirouit 
containing  a  souroe  <M  ourrent  supply,  a  transmitter,  a 
phonographio  receiver \and  a  oonaenser,  tho  saia  oon- 
aenser  being  looatefl  inVsnid  oirouit  intermoaiate  saia 
transmitter  and  reoeiver\  and  a  magnet  shunted  about  said 
souroe  cf  ourrent  supply  and  3aid  transmitter,  substan¬ 
tially  as  dosorlbed. 


Hijis  Specification  signeb  anb  toitnesseb  tijis  <2  2 '7*^aj>  of 


©HitneSSctij: 

. 

2rAl^ 


0atb. 


g>tatc  of  i?cUo  fcrScp  j  gg 
Countp  of  (Essex  ) 

Tuoj.fAS  a  .  -Edison  ,  tijc  abobc  nameb 
petitioner,  being  buhj  Stoorn,  bcpoSeS  anb  SapS  tijat  Ije  is  a  citizen  of  tije  Unitcb 
States,  anb  a  rcsibent  Of  Liev/ellyn  Paik  ,  V/oet  Orange,  Essex  county, 
New  Jersey. 

tijat  ije  beriljj  beliebcs  ijinisclf  to  be  tijc  original,  first  anb  sole  inbentor  of  tije 
improbentents  in  phohogbaphio  teleohaphs 


bcscribeb  anb  claimeb  in  tije  annexeb  specification ;  tijat  ije  bocs  not  Imoto  anb 
boes  not  beliebe  tijat  tije  same  toas  eber  fenoton  or  useb  before  ijis  inbention  or 
biscobcrp  thereof ;  or  patenteb  or  bcscribeb  in  anp  printeb  publication  in  tijc 
fHniteb  States  of  America  or  anp  foreign  countrp  before  ijis  inbention  or 
biscoberp  thereof,  or  more  tijan  ttoo  pears  prior  to  tijis  application;  or  patenteb 
in  anp  countrp  foreign  to  tijc  ®niteb  States  on  an  application  fileb  more  tijan 
ttoelbe  montijS  prior  to  tijis  application;  or  in  public  use  or  on  sale  in  tije 
®nitcb  states  for  more  tijan  ttoo  pears  prior  to  tijis  application;  anb  tijat  no 
application  for  patent  upon  Saib  inbention  fjas  been  fileb  bp  ijiin  or  ijis  legal 
repreSentatibcS  or  assigns  in  anp  foreign  countrp. 

_ l7  iLrvu^o  _ 

g)toorn  to  anb  SubScribeb  before  me  tijis  -2-27%ap  I9\l 

35otarp  public. 


[H>eal] 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 
UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 


WASHINGTON  May  29,  1911. 

Thomas  A.  Udlson, 

=/0  p-  L‘  tyor’ 

Orunge,  How  Jersey.  1 

Please  find  below  a  communication  from  the  EXAMINER  in  charge  of  your  application. 

S.  Ho.  616,757,  filed  Mar.  24,  1911,  Phonograph! o  Telegraphs 


A 


l 


This  implication  has  been  examined. 

Claims  1  and  2  are  rejected  on  patont  to  Kumberg, 
636,209,  Oct.  31,  1099,  179  -  6. 

Claims  3,  4  and  5  are  rejected  on  patent  to  Tuylor, 
289,173,  Hov.  27,  1883,  178  -  Automatic,  In  view  of 
Kumborg.  It  Is  considered  no  invention  to  use  the  phono¬ 
graphic  receiver  of  Kunberp  in  the  holographic  system  of 
Taylor. 

Cli’imB  6,  7  and  8  are  rejected  on  patents  to  Taylor 
and  Kumborg,  cited,  in  view  of  Kdioon,  147,313,  i’eb.  10, 
k874,  178  -  Automatic.  In  this  patent  to  Edison  It  is  seen 
to  be  old  to  place  inductance  and  rosi stance  In  shunt  around 
the  transmitter. 


IN  THE  united  states  patent  office 


Thomas  A.  Edison 
PHONOGRAPHIC  TELEGRAPHS 
Filed  March  24,  1911 
Serial  No.  616,757 

HONORABLE  COMMISSIONER 
SIR: 

In  response  to  the  Office  action  of 
May  29,  1911,  please  amend  the  above  entitled  oase  as  fol¬ 
io  vra  :  - 

Page  3,  line  23,  after  "containing"  insert  -  a 
source  of  inductance,  suoh  as  -  . 

Claim  Inline  2,  erase  "corresponding";  and  in 
line  3,  before  "to"  insert  -  corresponding  to  the  charac¬ 
ters  of  the  messages  -  . 

Claim  2,  line  2,  erase  "corresponding";  and 
after  "pulsations"  insert  -  corresponding  to  the  characters 
of  the  messages  -  . 

Canoel  Claims  4,  5,  6,  7  and  8. 

Add  the  following  olaim:-  . 

The  method  of^.U'cmumit ling  Haaaagcs ,  whioh  oon- 

Isists  in  transmitting  eleotrioal  pulsations  corresponding 
to  the  oharaatorB^lTttee^essages  to  receiving  station 
at  a  high  speed,  transforming  the  eleotrioal  pulsations  into 
meohanioal  pulsations  at  the  receiving  station^reaording/  ^ 
the  last  named  pulsations  ‘upcn-a-s»4table--phonographr-reeo-rd 
blent,  a'ndjjwililily  "ropro du o i ng  the  same  from  the  resultant 
record  at  ,s^r^1foe4  %feed,  substantially  as  described. 


Room  No.  109. 


(1) 


REMARKS 

Hone  of  the  references  disoloses  the  method  of 
transmitting  messages  whioh  oonsists  in  transmitting  puls¬ 
ations  corresponding  to  the  oharaoters  of  the  messages,  to 

s  '  /  A . . 

jj  the  receiving  station  at  a  high  speed,  .recording  the  puls- 

ations  at  the  reooiving  station,  and  reproducing  the  same 
j]  from  the  resultant  record  at  a  reduced  speed.  This  method 
forms  the  basis  of  the  subject  matter  of  all  the  olaims  as 
i|  now  presented.  The  Kumberg  patent  is  the  only  reference 
ji  in  whioh  the  idea  of  transmitting  pulsations  to  a  receiving 
{station,  recording  suoh  pulsations,  and  reproducing  the  same 
|  from  the  reoord  is  revealed.  Kumberg,  however,  fails  to  • 

|  disclose  the  idea  of  sending  the  messages  at  a  high  speed 
|  and  reproducing  them  at  a  reduoed  speed,  and  as  a  matter  of 
jj  fact ,  Kumberg*  s  device  would  be  inoperative  if  the  reoord 
|  were  reproduced  at  a  substantially  reduoed  speed,  because, 
lias  disclosed,  it  is  adapted  for  telephonic  use  only,  and 
in  order  that  the  sounds  shall  be  distinguishable  upon  re- 
1  production,  the  phonograph  reoord  must  be  driven  at  a  speed 
ij  corresponding  to  that  at  whioh  the  reoord  was  made.  Kum¬ 
berg  merely  disoloses  a  method  of  reoording  the  message 
|  transmitted  and  reproducing  the  same  as  sent ,  i.  e.,  repro¬ 
ducing  corresponding  Bounds  at  the  same  speed.  Applicant* 
method  was  devised  in  order  that  the  oapaolty  of  the  trans¬ 
mitting  line  may  be  increased,  while  at  the  same  time  the 
messages  may  be  reproduced  at  the  receiving  end  at  suoh  a 
rate  as  to  be  distinguishable  by  the  operator.  In  the  use 
for  whioh  applicant's  method  is  especially  adapted,  viz., 
telegraphy,  it  is  not  neoessary  that  the  pulsations  repro- 


!  duoed  be  of  the  same  duration  as  those  transmitted,  but 
only  that  the  same  ratios  between  the  successive  pulsations 
transmitted  and  the  corresponding  reproduced  pulsations  be 
maintained.  In  both  the  Edison  and  Taylor  references-  a 
record  is  made  of  the  pulsations  at  the  receiving  station, 
but  thore  is  no  reproduction  of  suoh  reoord.  The  only  way 
in  which  to  decipher,  these  records  is  by  reading,  which  is 
slow  and  tedious. 

For  the  above  reasons  allowance  of  the  olainiB 
|  is  solicited. 

j  Kespeotfully  submitted, 

i|  THOMAS  A.  EDISON 

j  By.  XSLvr&i'. - 

!j  His  Attorney 


\ 


Orange,  How  Jersey 
May  3  *  1912. 


\  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 

V  UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 


WASHINGTON 

Thomas  A.  Kdison, 

O/o  P.  L.  Dyer, 

Orange,  H.  J« 

Please  fin, l  below  a  communication  from  the  EXAMINER  in  charge  of  your  application. 

g.  uo,  616,757,  filed  5Iar.  84,  1911,  Phonographic  Telegraphs. 


Commu«o»6r  of  Patents. 


This  action  is  in  response  to  amendment  filed  Hay 
4,  1912. 

Claims  1,  £  and  4  are  rejected  on  the  patent  to 
Kumberp,  of  record,  and  claim  2  is  rojeoted  on  patent 
to  Taylor,  of  record.  In  view  of  patent  to  Kumbarp. 

It  is  of  common  knowledge  that  a  phonograph  may.  rer  j 
cord  at  one  speed  and  repro duo another  speed, 
and  in  the  patent  to  Jones,  766, 1P9,  Aug.  8,  1904, 

170  -  Automatic,  d,  it  should  be  noted  that  the 
method  is  old  to  record  at  a  very  high  speed  and  re¬ 
produce  at  a  lower  speed.  In  this  reperd  attention 
is  called  to  linos  31  to  43,  Inclusive,  pape  1  of 
this  patent  to  Jones. 

Claim  4  is  olso  rejected  as  an  improper  method 
because  of  the  apparatus  limitation,  namely,  phono¬ 
graph  record  blank. 


IH  THE  UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OPPICE 


I  Thomas  A.  Edison 

PHONOGRAPHIC  TELEGRAPHS 
Piled  March  24,  1911 
Serial  No.  616,757 


ij  HONORABLE  commissioner  op  patents, 

SIR: 

I  In  response  to  the  Office  action  of. 

I  June  17,  1912,  please  amend  the  above  entitled  case  as 
||  follows 

\  Claim  1.  line  3.  before  "re-"  insert  -  phonograph-  : 

'  ll  ioally  -  •  Line  5,  before  "reproducing"  insert  -  phono-  j 
j  graphically  -  ,  and  before  "record"  Insert  -  resultant  -  •  i 
Lines  5  and  6,  cancel  "by  operating  the  record".  Line  6, 
before  "reduoed"  insort  -  greatly  -  . 

Cano el  claim  2. 

Claim  3,  line  7,  cancel  "impressing  or"  and  insert  - 
phonographioally  -  .  line  8.  -cancel  "upon  a  suitable  blanh  . 
Same  line,  before  "reproducing"  insert  -  phonographioally  -  , 
Line  9,  before  "reduoed"  insert  -  greatly  -  •  i 

Claim  4,  line  5,  before  "recording"  insert  - 

•  phonographioally  -  .  Lines  6  and  7,  cancel  "upon  a  suitable 
i  phonograph  record  blank".  Line  7,  cancel  "audibly"  and 

j  insert  -  phonographioally  -  -  /  line  8,  before  "reduoed" 

•  jl  insert  -  greatly  -  . 

I  Renumber  olaims  3  and  4  as  2  and  3. 


(1) 


B  E  M  A  R  K  S 


In  the  decision  rendered  in  Carnegie  Steel  Co., 
ltd.  vb.  Cambria  Iron  Company,  99  0.  G.  1866;  1908  0.  D., 

598,  it  is  stated  that  in  order  to  anticipate  a  prooess  it 
|  is  neoessary  not  only  to  show  that  the  devioe  dieolosed  in 
I  the  patent  oited  might  have  boon  used  to  oarry  out  the  pro- 
!  oess,  but  that  such  use  was  oontemplated.  Kumberg  of  reo- 
|  ord  aooordingly  does  not  anticipate  the  olaims  as  he  oer- 
jj  tainly  did  not  contemplate  transmitting  pulsations  oorres- 
ji  ponding  to  the  characters  of  the  messages  to  the  receiving 
ji  station  at  a  hir:h  sneed  and  reproduoing  the  samo  from  the 
|  resultant  reoord  at  a  great ly  reduced  sneed.  Moreover,  the 
j!  apparatus  disclosed  in  this  patent  could  not  be  suooessfully 
used  to  oarry  out  applicant's  prooess  as  defined  in  the 
olaims,  as  this  apparatus  is  adapted  for  telephonio  use  only, 

1  and  it  is  neoessary,  in  order  that  the  sounds  reproduced  from 
the  reoord  made  by  this  apparatus  may  bo  distinguishable,  to 
to  drive  the  reoord  at  a  speed  corresponding  to  that  at  whioh 
the  reoord  was  made. 

Taylor  of  reoord  fails  to  disclose  the  step  of 
reproduoing  the  reoord  made  at  the  receiving  station.  Both 
Taylor  and  Jones  fail  to  disclose  the  steps  of  phonograph! - 
j  oally  recording  the  pulsations  at  the  reoeiving  station  and 
phonograph! a ally  reproduoing  the  same  from  the  resultant 
reoord  at  a  greatly  reduced  speed. 

For  the  above  reasons,  further  consideration  and 
allowanoe  of  the  olaims  as  now  presented  are  requested. 

IRcspeotfully  submitted, 

THOMAS  A.  EDISON 

By  .  <~?£.  _ I 

Orange,  Hew  Jersey  Sis  Attorney 

May  83rd,  1913 

WH-JS 


Dlv.-jcyx.  Room-109..  C.N.D.  2-200  _  Paper  No. -6-  -  ^ 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 
UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 

WASHINGTON  . Aufuat..8a^.l9.ia*. 


. Mr.. .I*.  ...Lt... Dyer. , . 

. .Qranga.,..Haw.,.fersey.. 


Please  find  below  a  communication  from  the  EX  AMI  HER  in  aharge  of  the  application  of 
.  IhoBiaB-A.-iSdleon.,— 6X6.,-7-57.,—fiXeA-ilaro.h-54., -1911,  -for . 


ThiB  aotion  is  in  response  to  amendment  of  May 

24,  1913. 

Claims  1  and  3  are  rejected  on  the  patent  to  humborg 
pf  reoprd,  and  claim  2  is  rejected  on  the  patent  to  Kumberg 
in  view  of  patent  to  faylor  of  record. 

It  is  of  common)  knowledge  aB  stated  that  a  phono-  ' 
graph  may  be  operated  at  any  speed  desired  and  the  recording 
at  one  speed  in  the  patent  to  Kumberg  and  reproducing  at 
another  Bpeed  oan  not  be  considered  an  invention.  In  telegra¬ 
phy  by  the  use  of  a  perforated  tape  jit  is  very  common  to 
record  at  a  high  speed  and  reproduce  at  a  lower  speed  as 
shown  in  the  patent  to  Jones  cited,  showing  the  prinoiple 
to  be  old. 


Ill  SHE  TOUTED  STATES  PATENT  0  IT  ICE, 


THOMAS  A,  EDISON, 

PE  HO  GRAPHIC  TELEGRAPHS, 
Piled  March  24,  1911, 
Serial  Ho.  616,767* 


^2 


HOBORABLE  COMMISSIONER  OE  PATENTS, 

R  I  K: 

In  response  to  the  Office  action  off  August 
28,  1913,  please  amend  the  above  entitled  oasejis  follows: 

Page  2,  lines  28  and  29, cancel  "by  me". 
Claims \ ,  2  and  3,  lino  1,  cancel  "transmitt- 
;  messages"  and  insort  -  rapid  telegraphy  -  . 

Claim  1,  line  3,  cancel  the  matter  inserted 
by  the  amendment  of  May  4,  191?.  before  the  word  "to"  and  , 
insert  in  plaoo  thereof  - 
messages  - 


to  the  oharaoters 


i  me  an ago  r 


Claim  2,  line  3,  cancel  "the  message"  and 

s  ' 

insert  ..  a  message  or  messages  -  ■  • 

Claim  3,  line  3,  cancel  "the"  second  occnrrencjf 

and  Insert  -  a  message  or  -  • 


REMARKS 

Applloant  has  oonceived  a  new  method  of  rapid 
telegraphy  embodying  a  now  combination  of  steps  Hot 
disclosed  in  or  suggested  by  any  of  the  references  of  reoord. 
So  far  as  applloant  is  aware,  never .previous  to  his  invention, 
have  messages  been  phonographioally  recorded  at  the 
receiving  station  of  a  telegraph  system.  Knmberg  absolute¬ 
ly  fails  to  disclose  applicant's  invention,  the  apparatus 
disclosed  in  his  patent  comprising  a  telephone  system  com¬ 
bined  with  phonographic  apparatus  to  reoord  speech  at 

other 

either  end  of  the  line  and  to  transmit  such  o^reoorded 
1 


epeooh  from  one  end  of  the  line  to  the  other  -  it  being 
essential  in  Kumberg's  apparatus, in  order  to  seoure  satis¬ 
factory  results ,thot  the  phonographic)  record  be  reproduced 
at  the  some  speed  at  whioh  it  tob  recorded*  As  has  been 
set  forth  in  the  remarks  accompanying  previous  amendments, 
the  reproduction  of  the  phonograph  record  or  reoords  em¬ 
ployed  in  Knmber.'s  device  at  a  substantially  different 
speed  from  the  Speed  of  recording  thereof  would  render 
Kumberg's  device  inoperative  for  the  purposes  for  which  it 
was  intended  and  designed. 

Beferring  to  the  rejection  of  claim  2  on 
Kwh  erg  in  view  of  Taylor,  it  is  submitted  that  it  is  not 
at  all  obvious  how  the  devices  disclosed  in  these  patents 
could  he  combined  so  as  to  produce  apparatus  capable  of 
carrying  out  the  method  described  in  this  claim,  but  that 
such  a  combination  would  involve  invention.  ! 

The  patent  to  Jones  appears  to  be  the  only  | 

reference  of  reoord  disclosing  a  method  of  rapid  telegraphy 
in  which  the  messages  are  transmitted  and  recorded  at  a 
high  speed  and  then  audibly  reproduced  at  a  lower  speed. 
Jones,  howover,  found  it  necessary  to  employ  a  very  com¬ 
plicated  and  expensive  apparatus  to  carry  out  this  method 
and  did  not  contemplate  the  recording  of  the  messages 
phonographically  and  the  phonographio  reproduction  of  the 
1  resultant  record.  Applicant,  by  his  improved  method  is 
enabled  by  a  comparatively  simple  and  inexpensive  apparatus 
to  obtain  a  record  of  very  rapidly  transmitted  messages 
whioh  do  not  need  to  be  deciphered  but  which  may  be  audibly 
reproduced  in  suoh  a  manner  as  to  be  rendered  intelligible 
to  a  listener. 


2 


For  the  above  reasons,  further  consideration 
find  allowance  of  the  claims  are  requested. 


Respectfully  submitted, 
i’HOMAS  A.  ERISOil, 


Orange,  H ev;  Jersey  his  Attorney. 

July  -2  7.  1914. 


WAH-XGE 


arra. 


Dlv.—lfi—  Room  -109  - 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 
UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 

WASHINGTON  . dep.t....El,..1914, 


Please  find  below  a  communication  from  the  EXAMINER  in  charge  of  the  application  of 

. .Thama..i....-Kdisa^r.. Sr.  ^6*616-, 

. Shomgxnph  do.. -Telegraphs.. . 


- - - - 


:  In  response  to  amendment  of  July  80,  1914. 

In  the  potent  to  Jones  of  record  or  in  tho  patent  to 
Sfelng  #578 ;  126,  .March  2,  1897,  (178-3)  it  is  old  ae  shown  to 
transmit  rapidly,  record  at  this  high  speed  and  then  reproduce 
nt  a  elpwer  speed.  Therefore  the  broad  method  claimed  by 
applicant  is  not  novel.  The  speoiflo  method  of  transmitting 
intelligence  by  rapid  impulses,  rapidly  recording  them  on  a 
,  phonograph  and  reproducing  them  more  slowly  iB  but  a  ohango  in 
,  the  spool fio  type  of  recorder  rather  than  a  ohange  of  the  method 
V  itself.  It  is  sb  applicant  is  well  aware,  extremely  common  to 
run  a  phonograph ’rapidly  or  slowly,  Juab  as  desired.  The 
phonograph,  then,  1b  w$11’ understood,  as  a  receiver  of  a  type 
whioh  oan  be  used  in  the  method  practiced  by  JoneB  or.:  ffeiny, 
and  its  substitution  ie  believed  to  be  obvious. 

Attention  1b  called  to  the  patent  to  Gibboney,  463,188, 

Hov.  17,  1891,  (179-6),  as  a  father  example  of  the  type  of 
phonograph  reoeiver  oapabie  aB  described  in  "the  patent- Of  re¬ 
cording  at  one  Bpeed  and  reproducing  at  a  different  speed. 

(In  this  case  faster).  It  is  beliaye.d  plain  Gibboney’ b  phono¬ 
graph  reoeiver  oould  without  invention  be  substituted  for  that 
of  Jones  or  ffeiny.  looked  at  in  another  way  the  reoordds  of 
Gibboney  oouli-’be:  without  invention  made  toireoord  the  impulses' 


616,767 - 8. 

•j?rom  the  i’aylor  transmitter. 

Jfor  the  above  reasons  the  claims  are  again  rejeoted. 


iSxsminor,  Div.  16. 


IN  THE  UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OEPIOE 


Thomas  A.  Edison 
PHONOGRAPHIC  TELEGRAPHS 
Piled  Maroh  24,  1911 
Serial  No.  616,75V 


Room  No.  109. 


HONORABLE  CCKMIS3I0NER  OP  PATENTS, 
SIR: 


I 

! 


ThiB  letter  is  responsive  to  the  Office 
aotion  of  September  21,  1914. 

It  is  thought  that  claims  1,  2  and  S  should  he 
allowed  in  their  present  form.  It  is  submitted  that 
applicant  has  deviBed  a  new  method  of  rapid  telegraphy  in¬ 
volving  the  steps  of  phonographioally  recording  mdssagos 
transmitted  to  a  receiving  Btation  at  a  high  speed  and  then 
phonographioally  reproducing  the  same  at  a  greatly  reduced 
speed.  None  of  the  references  cited  disoloses  the  speoifio 
method  consisting  of  the  combination  of  steps  described  in 
the  olaims.  It  is  thought  that  the  use  of  the  phonograph 
receiver  of  Gibboney  No.  463,188  in  place  of  the  receiver 
or  reoorder  in  the  systems  of  Taylor,  Jones  or  Weiny,  in 
making  a  phonographic  reoord  of  messages  transmitted  at  a 
high  speed  and  the  reproduction  of  such  messages  from  the 
resultant  reoord  at  a  greatly  reduced  speed  is  not  an  obvious 
thing  to  do,  but  involves  a  change  in  the  method  of  Taylor, 
Jones  and  ffeiny  necessitating  the  exercise  of  invention. 

The  advantages  resulting  from  the  new  combinations  of  steps 
described  in  the  olaims  are  oloarly  set  forth  in  the  spooi- 


(X) 


I  fioation  and  in  the  remarks  aooompaaying  previous  amendments, 
I  me  steps  of  phono  graphically  recording  the  mess¬ 

ages  transmitted  to  a  receiving  station  at  a  high  speed  and 
phonographioally  reproducing  such  messages  from  the  result¬ 
ant  reoord  at  a  greatly  reduood  speed,  which  steps  are  in- 
|  eluded  in  each  of  the  claims  now  presented,  introduces  into 
;  the  hroad  method  disclosed  by  Taylor,  Jones  and  Weiny  a 
different  idea  of  means.  Consequently,  the  method  claimed 
:  herein  is  a  new  method  and  a  now  invention.  In  this  oon- 
:  nootion  the  Esarainor's  atfcontion  is  directed  to  page  253, 

;  vol,  1  of  Robinson  on  patents,  whore  it  is  stated  in  offeot 
’  that  any  variation  in  the  number  or  character  of  the  stops 
j  of  a  method  which  introduces  a  different  idea  of  moans  con- 
!  stitutos  a  new  art  and  a  new  invention. 

|  A  useful  result  is  attained  by  applicant's  pro- 

:  oess,  and  as  the  art  cited  does  not  disclose  the  said  pro- 
1  cass>  reconsideration  and  allowance  are  respectfully  re- 
i!  quested. 

1  Rospeotfully  submitted. 


|  raiffiUF.  A.  EDI  SOI! 

By 

j  Orange,  H.  J.  Eis  attorney 

j  September  ^  ,  1916 


Y/H-JS 


f  i  i  i 

I  i,.  vE I  I 


2-260 


Paper  No . 2-0- 


Waihlnglon,  D,  C„" 


*'.u. 


application  should  five  the  serial  number, 
date  ol  flllnf ,  title  of  Invention,  and 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 

UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 

WASHINGTON  . Ont  ^.12X..1‘J1.5. 


■hr.  i'.  I..  Pyo r . . 

O  ran  ye  ,  How  JorHfly 


Please  find  below  a  communication  from  the  EXAMINER  in  ohurge  of  the  application  of 

. T.  A.  Ildi  non .  1.  Ilo.  016,767.  mod  Mar.  IV.  I1.):!]. . . 

I’honojvnphi u  TolojamjjihB^ . . 


Qjmmiftioner  of  Patents.  <f 


Thin  action  Is  In  roanonno  to  corn'cnicM  t  i  on 
'Tiod  ''ert,  in,  1015. 

Tho  entente  to  Honors,  '177 ,  ;!fi r.) ,  lay  P,  1  PP3 , 
end  363,06,5,  All".  33,  1PP3,  176  -  13,  end  also  that 
to  Ponl  Run,  673,063,  "co.  HP1,  3  307 ,  ( onpooinlly 
]  1  nos  13-16,  pr<‘ro  .11,  IP!  -  1,  urn  ,rs da  of  record. 

Those  patents  shov.  it  Is  old  to  transmit  a  telo- 
crrunhic  codn  moBpa^o  over  a  lino,  phonorraphi cal  1  y 
record  such  mam <re,  end  thereby  reproduce  tho  m«- 
niifTO.  Tho  only  point  in  applicant's  nlalwr,  over 
thlr  state  o<*  the  art,  Hee  in  the  rnpid  trnnemio- 
aion  and  reoordir.fr,  and  tho  olowor  reproduction,  tho 
purpoeo  of  which  in  to  r.nvo  time  In  the  mie  of  tho 
tranmni anion  line.  Plnoe  Jones,  Tn.vlor  and  '.Vein? 
dletsl  oso,  whnt  applicant  1c  well  a  worn  of,  that  It 
hnn  lonr  boon  customary  to  utilise  n  trunsniBclon  line 
to  an  inovoauod  dopreo  by  rs.pl  dly  transmit  tin?  and 
rocordinr  the  mosaapoS  nnd  then,  fun  stated  in  linen 
31  to  36,  pa  fro  1,  of  the  Jonop  patent),  at  the  ro- 
eelvlnr  ond  of  tho  line  reprodnoi  np  the  recorded 


ID  THE  UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OPPIOE 

Thomas  A.  Edison 
PHONOGRAPHIC  TELEGRAPHS 
Piled  March  24,  1911 
Serial  Ho.  616,757 

HONORABLE  COMMISSIONER  OP  PATENTS, 

SIR: 

This  letter  is  responsive  to  the  Offio 
action  of  October  12,  1915. 

The  rejection  of  the  olaims  on  the  references 
oitod  in  the  last  Office  aotion  is  belie vod  to  be  unwarrant¬ 
ed.  These  references  fail  to  disclose  the  principal  steps 
of  applicant's  method  which  are  set  forth  in  each  of  the 
olaims,  namely,  the  steps  of  phono graphically  recording 
at  a  high  speed  messages  transmitted  to  a  station  and  then 
messages  from  a  resultant 
Moreover,  it  is  sub¬ 
mitted  that  in  view  of  the  patents  to  Jones,  Taylor  and 
Wo ins,  none  of  which  diaolosos  the  idea  of  phono graphic ally 
recording  messages  and  then  phono  graphically  reproducing 
such  messages,  and  each  of  whioh  involves  the  employment  of 
moans  altogether  different  in  character  from  the  means  em¬ 
ployed  by  Rogers  and  Poulsen,  it  would  not  be  an  obvious 
thing  to  employ  the  systems  of  Rogers  and  Pulsen  to  carry 
out  applicant's  method.  Phonographs  are  usually  operated 
at  the  same  speed,  both  in  recording  and  in  reproducing, 


Room  No.  109. 


;£r,„. 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 
UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 
WASHINGTON  . 


F.  3..  Dyer. . 

. OrunjrejL..K..„„J.. 


£  JUN  12  1J;J 


find  below  a,  communication  from  the  EXAMINER  in  charge  of  the  application  of 

I.  a .  Hdison,  S .  Ho.  C.16.7B7.  filed  'iir.  P. 4,._ 3.9 3.1, . 


P ho  no  pr up h  1  c  Tel  ^  gr  aph  b_. 


This  action  Is  In  response  to  argument  filed 
May  SI,  192G . 

The  claims  are  amain  rejected  upon  the  refer¬ 
ences  and  for  the  reasons  of  record. 

The  examiner  has  fully  reviewed  the  art  and 
its  relation  to  the  claims  and  el  so  applicant's 
arguments.  It  is  thought  there  is  nothin'*  patent¬ 
able  disclosed  in  the  application*  Strictly,  ap¬ 
plicant  does  not  phonomranhl pally  record  the  measure, 
os  there  Is  nothin?  phonopruphi o  about  the  trans¬ 
mission  end  recording  of  electric  impulses  produced 
by  a  make  and  break  devioe  and  recorded  by  a  magnet. 
The  record  made  is  not  a  sound  reoord  at  all,  altho, 
when  associated  with  different  meohanisms,  it  may 
be  used  to  produce  sound. 

The  case  has  been  ponding  over  fivo  years  and 
has  boon  many  times  considered.  This  rojeotlon  is, 


xn  THK  UNITED  STATES  PATENT  .OFFICE 


I  Thomas  A.  EiUson 
PHONO OhAHlIC  TELE  Oh*!  H3 
piled  March  24,  1911 
Serial  No.  616,757 

HONORABLE  OOKiaSSIOKEP  OF  PATENTS, 

SIR: 

j  X  hereby  constitute  and  appoint  DYER 

L  HOLDEN  (Registration  Ko .  "244),  a  firm  composed  of  Frank  1 
j  Dyer  aftd  Delos  Holcten,  whore  address  is  Edison  Office  Build- 
iling,  Orange,  New  Jersey,  as  my  associates  in  the  prosecution 

I  of  the  above  entitled  application,  and  request  that  all 
correspondence  be  addressed  to  then  until  further  notice. 

Respectfully, 

"  7* 

Orange ,  N .  J . 

January  /V  ,  1917. 


Patent  Series 
Patent  Application  Files 

Folio  #  722  Talking  Machines  (Case  A) 

Serial#:  617674 

Primary  Applicant:  Edison,  Thomas  A 

Date  Executed:  3/28/1 91 1 


Folio  No.,7. «2....2«£ . 


Serial  No .Ll.J.. . kljJ* 


Applicant. 

C7  '£strvi^t*so  $  i^- 


.^i4fe*<fe!<a . (!h30t!sJLka%S^ . l^fafcfe-AjL . 


Filed  *.?, /#//.•  Examiner’s  Room  No. 

Assignee  . 

Ass’g’t  Exec . Recorded . Liber . Page 

Patent  No. .  Issued . . 


ACTIONS. 


I  0L-ffrU>  'iCu&s)  .  10 

o  O^i/isc/  .  17 


FRANK  L.  DYER, 

Counsel, 

Orange,  New  Jersey. 


petition 


(Eo  the  Commissioner  of  patents : 

gour  Petitioner  thohas  a.  10)18011, 

a  citizen  of  tije  Unitcb  States!,  resibing  anb  Ijabing  a  Post  ©ffice  abbress  at 

Llewellyn  Park,  'Jest  Orange,  "Essex  County,  Hew  jersey, 


praps  that  letters  patent  map  be  grantcb  to  fjim  for  tlje  improbements  in 


-TALKING  TIACIINEG- 


set  fortlj  in  the  annexeb  specification ;  anb  fjc  fjercbp  appoints  Jfranb  X.  ©per 
(Registration  i2o.  560),  of  ©range,  iitetu  ferSep,  Ijis  attornep,  tuitf)  full 
potoer  of  Substitution  anb  rebocation,  to  prosecute  tfjis  application,  to  nrabe 
alterations  anb  amenbments  therein,  to  receibe  the  patent,  anb  to  transact  all 
business  in  the  Patent  ©ffice  connected  therebaitfj. 


(j 


\  SPECIFICATION. 

|  TO  ALL  WHOM  IT  MAY  CONCERN:  ' 

i  BE  IT  KNOWN,  that  I,  THOMAS  A.  EDISON,  a  j 

|  citizen  of  the  United  States  and  a  resident  of  Llewellyn  j 

i  park,  WeBt  Orange,  in  the  County  of  Essex  and  State  of  , 

;j  uew  Jersey,  have  invented  certain  new  and  useful  improve-  j 
|  ments  in  TALKING  MACHINES,  of  which  the  following  is  a  j 

|  description: 

\  )j(y  invention  relates  to  talking  machines  and 

jj  more  particularly  to  an  improved  method  and  means  for 
(I  recording  composite  sound  productions  such  as  are  pro- 
jj  duced,  for  example,  by  a  singer  and  acconpanist. 
j  It  has  heretofore  been  the  practice  to  record 

jj  only  the  resultant  sound  produced  by  the  combination  of  j 
|  the  sounds  from  the  various  sources  of  the  composite  pro-  J 
!  auction.  This  method  is  objectionable  in  that  the  super-  , 
position  of  the  undulations  corresponding  to  the  sounds  j 
from  each  source  produces  a  very  irregular  record  im¬ 
pression  which  it  is  difficult  to  accurately  trace  with 

!a  reproducing  stylus;  so  that  when  such  a  record  is 
reproduced,  the  distinctness  of  the  individual  parts  of 
the  coiqpoBite  sound  production  is  necessarily  more  or  less 
!  destroyed  so  as  to  render  it  impossible  to  give  desired 
|J  prominence  and  distinctness  to  any  particular  part,  for 
j  example,  that  of  the  singer. 

My  invention  has  for  itB  principal  object,  the 
I  provision  of  a  method  and  means  for  overcoming  this  ob- 


"1< 


ject.lon,  In  conformity  with  this  objoot,  I  record  the 
part  or  parts  to  which  I  desire  to  give  moat  prominenoe 
separately  from  the  rest  of  the  production  and  in  such  a 
v/ay  that  the  various  parts  may  he  simultaneously  reproduced 
in  perfect  synchronism.  In  carrying  out  this  method,  the 
record  may  be  made  upon  a  single  blank  as  in  the  preferred 
embodiment  of  my  invention  disclosed  in  this  application 
i  or  upon  separate  synchronously  rotated  blanks  as  in  the 

embodiment  of  ay  invention  disclosed  in  my  companion 

VmW  Ao  .<&//.  it  7i  "•••/. 

application  entitled  Talking  Machines ,  and  filed  on  even 
date  herewith*  or  in  any  other  suitable  way.  In  addition 
I  to  my  improved  method  of  recording  sound,  my  invention 
i  comprises  simple  and  efficient  means  for  carrying  the  same 
;  into  effect  and  also  a  new  form  of  record  resulting  there- 
I  from.  Other  objects  of  my  invention  will  appear  more 
fully  in  the  following  specification  and  appended  claims: 

In  order  that  my  invention  may  be  more  fully 
understood,  attention  is  hereby  directed  to  the  accompany-  i 
ing  drawings  forming  a  part  of  this  specification  and  in  I 

1  which,  - 

Figure  1  represents  a  plan  view  partly  in  section  j 
of  a  preferred  type  of  recording  means  used  in  carrying 
p  out  my  invention; 

|j  Figure  2  represents  a  front  elevation  of  the 

j|  device  shown  in  Figure  1,  part  of  said  device  being  shown 

I  in  section  taken  on  line  2-2  of  Figure  1;  and 

Figure  3  represents  a  plan  view  of  a  preferred 
!|  type  of  reproducing  means.  In  all  of  the  views,  like 
jj  parts  are  designated  by  the  same  reference  numerals, 
l!  pef  erring  to  Figures  1  and  2,  the  numerals 

11  and  2  represent  two  adjacent  rooms  or  compartments 

,,2" 


separated  by  a  wall  3  having  mounted  therein  a  window  4 
permitting  viBion  from  one  compartment  to  the  otjier. 

The  numerals  3  and  6  represent  the  aide  walls  and  the 
|  numeral  7  the  top  wall  of  the  compartments.  Supported 
in  any  suitable  way  in  the  compartment  2  as  by  a  bracket 
8  is  a  sound  recording  machine  9  of  any  suitable  type.  j 
!  The  bracket  3,  as  shown,  is  provided  with  a  flange  10  j 

|  secured  by  rivets  or  other  fastening  moans  11  to  the  J 

wall  3.  The  machine  9  is  provided  with  a  vertical  shaft  j 
IS  rotated  by  a  motor  in  a  cabinet  13.  This  shaft  has  j 

secured  thereto  at  its  upper  end,  a  table  14  for  support-  ; 
ji  ing  a  sound  record  or  blank  15.  j 

j!  por  recording  upon  the  blank  15  the  sounds  from  , 

j  the  various  compartments,  a  plurality  of  recorders  16  j 

I1  are  provided,  each  of  these  recorders  being  mounted  in  a  | 

j  traveling  carriage  17  which  is  pivotally  and  slidably  j 

j  mounted  at  one  end  upon  a  horizontal  rod  18  supported  in  j 

I  'brackets  19  on  the  base  of  the  machine  9.  The  opposite 
j  elld  of  each  carriage  17  is  slidably  supported  upon  a 
j  straight  edge  20  projecting  vertically  upwards  from  the 
!  base  of  the  machine  9.  -Each  carriage  17  has  secured 
I  thereto  a  spring  arm  21  supporting  at  its  free  end,  a  feed 
nut  22  adapted  to  mesh  with  a  rotatable  feed  screw  23 
which  is  supported  by  pivots  34  in  the  brackets  19 .  In 
the  embodiment  of  the  invention  shown,  the  threads  on 
opposite  sides  of  the  centre  of  the  feed  aorow  23  are 
turned  in  opposite  directions  so  that  the  carriages  17 
and  reproducers  16  are  fed  in  opposite  direction  on  the 
record  blank  15.  *or  driving  the  feed  screw  33  from  the 

shaft  12.  I  Provid8  a  9haft  &  haVinS  Se°Ured 


w3' 


at  its  opposite  ends  a  bevel  gear  26  and  a  spiral  gear  27 
adapted  to  respectively  engage  the  bevel  gear  28  on  a 
shaft  12  and  the  spiral  gear  29  on  the  feed  screw  23. 

The  shaft  25  is  mounted  in  bearings  29.’  on  the  base  of 
the  machine  £. 

Bach  reproducer  has  connected  thereto  a  sound 
conveyor  30,  one  of  which  is  looated  entirely  in  the 
compartment  containing  the  machine  £  while  the  other  ! 

extends  through  the  partition  wall  3  into  the  compartment 
1.  in  order  to  produce  a  close  connection  between  the 
last  named  sound  conveyor  and  the  partition  wall,  the 
latter  is  provided  with  a  number  of  metallic  flanges  3^1 
having  curved  ends  32  forming  a  substantially  spherical 
socket.  The  sound  conveyor  extending  through  the  said  j 
wall  has  secured  on  its  outer  surface  by  friction  or  j 

otherwise,  an  annulus  33  having  a  spherical  outer  surface  j 
adapted  to  fit  closely  in  the  socket  formed  by  the  members  j 
31.  With  the  construction  described  above,  the  sound 
conveyor  extending  through  the  wall  has  a  free  universal  , 
movement  and  at  the  same  time  a  close  connection  is  ob¬ 
tained  between  the  said  conveyor  and  said  wall,  so  that 
the  various  compartments  remain  substantially  sound  tight. 

In  using  the  apparatus  described  above,  in  carry¬ 
ing  out  my  invention,  the  singer  or  other  source  to  which 
is  desired  to  give  most  prominence  is  placed  facing  the 
exit  of  one  of  the  sound  conveyors,  and  the  orchestra  or 
other  sources  of  sound  is  placed  in  front  of  the  exit  of 
the  other  sound  conveyor.  The  record  blank  W  having  j 
been  placed  upon  the  table  or  support  14  and  the  motor  j 
in  the  oasing  13  having  been  set  in  operation,  a  director  j 


gives  a  signal  through  the  window  4_  for  bringing  the  two 
souroes  of  sound  into  time  with  each  other.  The  rooms  or 
compartments  1  and  3  being  practically  sound  tight,  the 
sounds  from  the  various  sources  are  independently  recorded 
upon  the  blank  15.  In  the  arrangement  shown  in  Figure  1 
the  recorders  1(5  are  so  placed  that  the  spiral  record 
impressions  made  thereby  are  located  on  the  record  blank 
with  their  convolutions  alternating  with  each  other,  but 
evidently  many  other  arrangements  may  be  U3ed.  when  it 
is  desired  to  reproduce  the  original  production,  the 
record  made  by  the  method  indicated  above  is  placed  upon 
i  the  turn  table  34  (see  Fig.  3)  of  a  sound  reproducing 
j  machine  3£  of  any  preferred  type.  The  reproducers  36 
having  been  placed  at  the  starting  points  of  the  various 
record  impressions  as  indicated  in  Figure  3,  the  record 
when  set  into  rotation  produces  in  the  reproducers  36 
|  sound  vibrations  which  are  given  forth  through  to  the 
pivoted  sound  conveying  arms  37  and  the  fixed  amplifying 
horns  38  in  perfect  synchronism.  As  the  regularity  of 

||  the  undulations  corresponding  to  the  sound  from  the  princi- 

Ij 

jj  pal  source,  for  instance,  that  of  the  singer,  is  not  de¬ 
stroyed  by  the  superposition  of  the  undulRtions  corres¬ 
ponding  to  the  sound  from  the  other  source  or  sources, 
the  first  named  sound  can  be  reproduced  writh  a  high  degree 
of  distinctness.  In  addition  to  this  advantage,  the  use 
of  separate  record  grooves  and  reproducers  greatly  in¬ 
creases  the  volume  of  the  sound  given  forth, 
j  While  I  have  described  the  preferred  embodiment 

of  my  invention,  many  changes  may  be  made  in  the  specific 
|  structure  described  and  shown  without  departing  from  the 

ii  5  ii 


spirit’- of  my  invention  and  I  do  not,  therefore,  v/ish  to 
he  limited  to  this  disclosure, 

What  x  claim  as  now  and  desire  to  secure  by 
letters  Patent  of  the  United  States  is  as  follows; 


%f,v, 

A  record  for  composite  sound  productions  having 
plurkuty  of  record  impressions  each  representing  a  part 
of  the  (composite  production,  the  said  impressions  being 
arranged  \o  simultaneously  set  into  vibration  synchronous 
sound  wave a  for  producing  the  composite  production, 
substantially  as  set  forth. 

record  for  composite  sound  productions  having 
a  plurality  of  Yoncentric  spiral  record  impressions  each 
representing  a  part  of  the  composite  production,  the  said 
impressions  being Vr ranged  to  simultaneously  set  into 
vibration  synchronous  sound  waves  for  producing  the  com¬ 
posite  production,  substantially  as  set  forth. 

The  method  of  recording  composite  sound  pro- 

I  auctions  which  consists  in  producing  independent  meohanioal 
vibrations  corresponding  to  the  sound  from  each  of  several 

\  -“7  -'V-  / 

sources  and  synchrobcm3ly  impressing  these  vibrations^ 
in  a  suitable ^record  material,  substantially  as  set  forth. 

The  method  of  reoordih^ composite  sound  pro¬ 
ductions  which  consists  in  proiHicin&sindependent  mechanical 
vibrations  corresponding  to  the  sound  irom  each  of  several 
Bounces  in  a  plurality /of  spaced  recording  styluses ,  and 

//>/'»  ■  \ 

feeding  suitable -i»wte»4abie  record  material  synchronously 
past  the  said  styluses,  bo  as  to  impress  these  vibrations 
in  separate^paths  in  the  record  material,  substantially  as 


"  6 1 


The  method  of  recording  composite  sound  pro- 
duc t i cns'^hioir^enalsts  In  producing  independent  mechan¬ 
ical  vibrations  oorr^Stt^the  sound  from  each  of 

several  sources  and  synchronously  l^^sing  these  vi- 

hrati/ons/'tn/a  ‘  ro  tating"  record  "blank ,  sub  stant  daily  as  ^ 

set  forth. 

),  r 

$.  The  method  of  recording  composite  Bound 
productions  which  consists  in  producing  independent 
mechanical  vibrations  corresponding  to  the  sound  from 
-sach  of  several  sources  and  synchronously  lmpre^sing^ 
these  vibrations,  in  concentric  spiral  paths  having 
alternately  arranged  convolutions  in-a-rotati-ng -record 


\ 

bination  of  a  a 


device  of  the  olasB  described,  the  com¬ 
mon  of  a  rotatable  record  support,  and  a  plurality 
of  soundboxes  provided  with  independent  sound  conveyors 
and  adapted  to  be  moved  synchronously  over  the  face  of 
the  record,  support ,  substantially  as  set  forth. 

8.  l\a  device  of  the  class  described,  the  com¬ 
bination  of \  rotatable  record  support,  and  a  plurality 
of  recorders  ^ovided  with  independent  sound  conveyors, 
and  means  for  Reducing  a  synchronous  feeding  movement 
between  said  reorders  and  said  support,  substantially 
as  set  forth.  \ 

9.  In  a  device  of  the  class  described,  the  com¬ 
bination  of  a  plurality  of  sound  tight  compartments, 
a  rotatable  record  support  in  one  of  said  compartments, 


1171 


IsAund  oonveyors 'eaoh  having  an  enlarged  open  portion 

lolated  in  one  of  the  compartments  and  a  reoorder  connec¬ 
ted  with  each  sound  conveyor,  all  of  said  recorders  being 
adapted  to  move  synchronously  over  the  faoe  of  the  record 
|  support,  substantially  as  set  forth. 

iO.  In  a  device  of  the  class  described,  the  com¬ 
bination  of  a  plurality  of  sound  tight  compartments, 
a  rotaJable  record  support  in  one  of  said  compartments,  | 
sound  cinveyors,  each  having  an  enlarged  open  portion 
located  An  one  of  the  compartments  and  a  recorder  connected 
with  eacA sound  conveyor,  and  means  for  feeding  said  re¬ 
corders  synchronously  across  the  record  support,  sub- 
|  stantially\as  set  forth. 

11.  In  a  device  of  the  class  described,  the  com¬ 
bination  of  k  plurality  of  sound  oompartments  having  a 
partition  walV  therebetween,  a  xo  tatable  record  support 
in  one  of  said  compartments,  a  sound  conveyor  extending 
through  said  partition  wall,  means  permitting  lateral 
movement  of  said  conveyor  for  producing  a  closed  connec¬ 
tion  between  said  wall  and  conveyor,  and  a  reoorder  con- 
nected  with  said\ sound  conveyor  and  movable  transversely 
|l  and  vertically  oAthe  face  of  said  record  support,  sub- 

Iutantially  as  sot  forth.. 

12.  In  a  device  of  the  class  described,  the  com¬ 
bination  of  a  plurality  of  sound  compartments  having  a 
partition  wall  therebetween,  a  rotatable  record  support 
in  one  of  said  compliments,  a  sound  conveyor  extending 
through  said  partitiXWall,  means  permitting  universal 


I 


movement* of  said  conveyor  for  producing  a  closed  connection 
betlen  said  wall  and  conveyor,  and  a  recorder  connected 
witAaid  sound  conveyor  and  movable  transversely  and 
||  vertically  of  the  face  of  said  record  support,  substan- 
j  tially Vs  set  forth. 

ISA  In  a  device  of  the  class  described,  the 
combination  of  a  plurality  of  sound  compartments  having 
partition  wall  therebetween,  a  rotatable  record  support 
one  of  said  compartments,  a  sound  conveyor  extending 
through  sairl  partition  wall,  means  permitting  lateral 
movement  of  laid  conveyor  for  producing  a  closed  connection 
between  said Vail  and  conveyor,  a  recorder  connected  with 
said  sound  coAveyor,  a  separate  sound  conveyor  located 
entirely  in  th\  compartment  containing  said  record  sup¬ 
port,  a  recorder  connected  with  said  last  named  sound 
conveyor,  and  meVns  for  feeding  said  recorders  simul¬ 
taneously  across Vhe  record  support,  substantially  f 
set  forth. 


14.  In  a  device  of  the  class  described,  the 
combination  of  a  plurality  of  sound  compartments  having 
a  partition  wall  therebetween,  a  rotatable  record  support 
in  one  of  said  compartments,  a  sound  conveyor  extending 
through  said  partition  V/all ,  mbans  permitting  universal 
movement  of  said  conveyW  for  producing  a  closed  connection 
between  said  wall  and  coVveyor,  a  recorder  connected  with 
said  sound  conveyor,  a  separate  sound  conveyor  located 
entirely  in  the  compartment  containing  said  record  sup¬ 
port,  a  recorder  oonneoted\with  said  last  named  sound 
conveyor,  and  means  for  feeling  said  recorders  simultan¬ 
eously  across  the  record  support,  substantially  as  set 


forth. 


tEijis  specification  signeb  anb  tuitneSSeb  bap  191' 


2.  JW . tf?  . 


©atb. 


H>tnte  of  i5cUi  JcrScp 
Couutp  of  (Essex  j 

THOMAS  A  ,  EDIROiT  ,  tljC  abobe  liatlTCb 

petitioner,  being  bultj  Sbtorn,  beposes  mib  Saps*  tljat  Ije  is  a  citizen  of  tlje  Uniteb 
States,  anb  a  vesibent  Of  Llewellyn  park,  West  Orange,  Essex  County, 
He-ff  jersey, 

tfjat  Ije  tocrily  belicbes  fjimself  to  be  tfje  original,  first  anb  Sole  inbentor  of  tlje 
inrprobentents  in  talking  machines 


beScribeb  anb  claitneb  in  tlje  annexeb  specification ;  tljat  Ije  boes  not  bnoln  anb 
boes  not  beliebe  tljat  tlje  Same  bias  eber  fenobm  or  nSeb  before  Ijis  inbention  or 
biscoberp  tljcreof;  or  patenteb  or  beScribeb  in  anp  printeb  publication  in  tlje 
Uniteb  states  of  America  or  anp  foreign  countrp  before  Ijis  inbention  or 
biscoberp  tljcreof,  or  more  tljan  tbio  pears  prior  to  tljis  application;  or  patenteb 
in  anp  countrp  foreign  to  tlje  fHnitcb  states  on  an  application  fileb  more  tljan 
ttoelbe  montljS  prior  to  tljis  application;  or  in  public  use  or  on  Sale  in  tlje 
Uniteb  states  for  more  tljan  tkoo  pears  prior  to  tljis  application;  anb  tljat  no 
application  for  patent  upon  Satb  inbention  IjaS  been  fileb  bp  Ijini  or  Ijis  legal 


representatibes  or  assigns  in  anp  foreign  countrp. 

fadod-n* - - 

dtoorn  to  anb  Subscribeb  before  me  tljis  bap  of  191/ 

[deal]  J2otnrp  public. 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 
UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 

WASHINGTON  ;:a.y  ?>,  1911, 

Shojnn3  A.  Hclinon, 

C/o  Frank  L.  Dyer, 

OrwRo,  Mew  Jersey. 

l'lente  find  below  a  communication  from  the  EXAMINER  in  charge  of  your  ap/dioaUon. 

Ser.  Mo.  017 , 074 ,  filed  Itor.  29,  1911,  for  Talk!  i-;  maht/ioe. 


The  proper  serial  number  should,  be  given  on  page  2.  9^  is 

not  on  t  ;c-  drawing.  '.'/here  is  29  shovrn  in  Pig.  IV 

Claims  1  and  2  arc.  drawn  to  a  record.  Claims  3,4,0  and 
6  are  drawn  to  a  process.  Claims  7  to  14  inclusive  are  drawn  to 
a  talking  machine,  .Division  between  these  several  groups  is 
required  according  to  the  provisions  of  i!ulo  42. 

In  amending  this  case  applicant  should  consult  the  following 
references : 

Uaodonald  Oct.  21,  1902,  711,700,  (101-2) 

Hill  Oct.  2,  1900,  659,020,  (101-2 

Wooster,  Hov.  9,  1909,  939,701,  (101-3) 

Hobson,  .Kng.  Pat.  June  15,  1907,  13,058  (181-3) 


Kxaminor,  Div.  23, 


XU  SHE  UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE. 


THOMAS  A.  EDISON ,  ) 
TALKING  MACHINES ,  ) 
Serial  Ho.  617,674  ) 
Filed  March  29,1911  ) 


Room  XIo .  379 


HONORABLE  COMMISSIONER  OF  PATENTS, 

S  I  R: 

In  response  to  OffjLco  action  of  May  5,  1911, 
please  amend  the  above  entitled  case  as  follows: 

In  line  1°,  page  2,  after  "application" 
insort  -  Serial  Ho.  617,675  -  . 

In  line  4,  claim  3,  change  "impressing" 
to  -  recording  -  and  after  "vibrations"  insert  -  independent, 
ly  of  each  other  -  .  j 

In  line  !d ,  claim  4,  cancel  "indentable"  . 

o 

In  line, 4,  claim  5,  change.  " impresoing" 
to  -  recording  -  ;  and  in  lino  5,  same  claim,  after 
"brat ions"  insert  -  i^lpcndently  of  oach  other  -  . 

In  line '5,  claim  6,  after  "vibrations" 
insert  -  upon  a  rotating  record  blank  -  ;  and  in  linos 
6  and  7,  same  claim,  cancel  "in  a  rotating  record  blank  ". 

Cancel  claims  1,  2  and  7  to  14  inclusive  and 
change  the  numerals  of  claims  3,4,  5  and  6  to  1,  2,  3  and 
4  respectively. 

Add  the  following  claims: 

The  method  of  recording  sound  vibrations 
simultaneously  emittod  from  a  plurality  of  sources  which 

•aouroes  independently-  of  -those-  frem-^the  other  joui  oe.B^,  ^ 
to  separate  recording  means^and  in  then  simultaneously  ^ 


(i 


||  and  synchronously  recording  the  different  sots  of  sound 
j  vibrations  in  separate  paths  in  the  record  material, 

i  substantially  as  described. 

S 

y.  The  method  of  recording  sound  vibrations 
I  simultaneously  emitted^from  of,  sources  jliioh^ 

]j  souroeft- 1  o  j 

|  separate  recording  means /ncfin  then  simultaheously 
j  and  synchronously  recording  the  different  sets  of  sound 
|  vibrations  in  separate  paths  upon  a  single  record  blanh, 

1  siibstantially  as  described.  I 

y[  The  mothod  of  recording  composite  sound  pro-  j 

auctions,  which  consists  in  causing  the  omission  in 
separate  sound-proof  compartments  of  sound  vibrations 
from  each  of  a  plurality  of  sound  sources,  in  conveying 
the  sound  vibrations  from  each  of  the  comportments  in- 
|  dependent!:/  of  those  from  the  other  compartments  to  soparatej 
j  recording  means,  and  in  then  simultaneously  and  synchronous-| 
j  iy  recording  the  different  sets  of  sound  vibrations  in 
|  separate  paths  in  the  record  material,  substantially  as 
!j  described . 

j  £  The  mothod  of  recording  composite  Bound  pro- 

|  auctions,  which  consists  in  causing  the  omission  in 
fj  separate  sound-proof  compartments  of  sound  vibrations 
i|  from  each  of  a  plurality  of  sound  sources,  in  convoying 
the  sound  vibrations  from  each  of  the  compartments  in-, 
depondontly  of  those  from  the  other  compartments  to  sep^ratoj 
recording  means,  and  in  then  simultaneously  and  synchronous- 
iy  recording  the  different  sets  of  sound  vibrations  in 
separate  paths  upon  a  single,  record  blanh,  substantially! 
as  described. 


I  !/fl 

ij  The  method  of  recording  sound  vibrations 

simultaneously  omitted  from  a  Plurality  of ^sources , which 
oonsistS  in“ cunveying-tiie- 


3 -fro: 


-oaoh-of— tlid 


oonsistG  in/( conveying— wie  □  ouriu-y^u  <*  ■  ^ ^  ^  ,-z. 

t0 

separate  recording  moana^andV  then  simultaneously  and 
|  synchronously  recording  the  different  sets  of  sound 
j  vibrations  upon  a  rotatable  record  blank  in  separate  spiral  ^ 
j!  paths  having  alternately  arranged  convolutions,  substantiallj/ 
I  aB  described. 


H  K  M  A  H  K  5 


I;  Tho  reference  numeral  9  is  sliovm  in  Pig.  2;  1 

ji  the  Examiner  is  respectfully  requested  to  apply  tno  sum< 
ij  to  the  base  plate  of  the  recording  machine  in  Fig.  1. 
j  The  spiral  gear  29  is  sliovm  in  the  middle  of  the  feed 
|  acrew  23  in  Pig.  1;  and  the  Examiner  is  respectfully  ro¬ 
ll  quested  to  apply  the  reference  numeral  thereto  in  the  said 
|j  figure. 

|j  The  claims  as  now  presented  uro  all  drawn  to 

|  a  -  pi leant’ s  process;  and  action  on  tlio  merits  thereof 
jj  is  accordingly  respectfully  requested.  aho  right  is 
j!  roserved  to  file  divisional  applications  on  the  subjects 
Ij  matter  of  the  cuneoled  claims, 
j]  Kospeot fully  submitted, 

THOMAS  4-  EIIS01I 
Orango,  How  Jersey,  By 

April  1912 


Uy  <f\  a  ,  .  yp  Ek, 

his  Attorney. 


Dlv.  ...J 


53-  Room . 3.^9 


V  N04,ReJ.' 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 

UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 

WASHINGTON  May  13,1912. 


TJjioraus  A.  Edison, 

Care  Frank  L.  Dyer, 

Orange,  How  Jersey  . 


D.S.  PATENT  OFFICE, 

MAY  131912 

M  A  I  LED. 


n  the  EXAMINER  in  charge  of  yi 


for  Talking  Machine i 
C>17, 674  . 


( filed  March  29,1911, aerial  number 


This  action  is  responsive  to  the  amendment  filed  April  9, 

1912. 

Claims  1,  2,  3,  5  and  6  are  rejected  upon  Hill  of 
record;  Macdonald  of  record;  Hohson  of  record;  Jungren.June  20, 
1911,  #995', 600,  (101-3). 

Claims  4  and  9  are  rejected  upon  the  cited  art.  So  far  as 
applicant's  process  is  concerned  it  is  patentably  immaterial  in 
what  conformation  the  record  grooves  are  produced.  Suc*i  an 
arrangement  of  record  grooves,  however,  are  old  in  Klein,  llaroh 
6,1906,  #014,058,(181-17). 

Claim  6,  line  2,  oorrect-  the  spelling  of  "plurality". 

Claims  7  and  0  are  rejected  upon  the  cited  art.  THa-degree 
to  which  the  several  performers  are  isolated,  is  not  patentably 
material  so  far  as  applicant's  prooeos  is  concerned. 

Claims  7  and  8  are  also  objeotionable  as  defining  the 
process  by  the  apparatus  employed. 


Ill  SHE  UHITED 


STATES  PATJ2JT  OFFICE. 


thomas  a.  saiaoit . 

TALKI1TG  KACHIliKS, 

Filed  March  29,  1911, 

Serial.  Ho.  617,674. 

HOHOHAB1E  OOUMIiiSIOHBR  OF  PATRHT8 , 
a  I 

In  ronponfte  to  the  Office  action  of  May  13, 
1912,  please  amend  tho  abovo  entitled  oooo  as  follows : 

Cancel  elainn  1,  2  ur.S  3. 

In  linos  3  and  4,  claim  5,  change  "conveying 
the  sound  vibrations  from  each  of  tho  sourcos  independently 
of  those  from  the  other  sourcos”  to  -  isolating  tho 
vibrations  from  one  source  from  the  vibrations  from  another 
source,  convoying  each  isolated  sot  of  vibrations  -  ;  a-nd 
in  line  5,  same  claim,  after  "moans"  insert  a  comma  (,). 

In  lino  2,  claim  6,  change  "plutality" 
to  -  plurality  -  ;  in  lines  3  and  4,  same  claim,  change 
"conveying  tho  sound  vibrations  from  each  of  the  sourcos 
independently  of  those  from  tho  other  sources"  to 
-  isolating  tho  vibrations  from  one  source  from  tho  vi¬ 
brations  from  anothor  source,  conveying  each  isolated  set 
of  vibrations-  ;  and  in  lino  6,  sane  claim,  after  "moans" 
inoort  a  comma  (  ,Jai, 

In  lines  3  and  4,  claim  9,  change  "convoying 
the  sound  vibrationa  from  each  of  tho  sources  independently 
of  those  from  tho  other  sources"  to  -  isolating  tho  vi¬ 
brations  from  ono  source  from  the  vibrations  from  anothor 

I  source,  convoying  oaoh  isolated  set  of  vibrations  -  ; 
and  in  lino  5,  same  claim,  after  "means"  inuort  a  comma  (,). 


| 

) 

Room  Ho.  379. 

) 

) 


Change  tho  numerals  of  olaimo  4  to  9  inclusive 


to  1  to  6  inolusivo. 


R  E  M  A  R  K  S3 

Referring  to  tho  rejection  of  claims  1  an a  6 
(former  oluimB  4  ana  9)  it  is  pointed  out  that  tho  pro¬ 
duction  of  difforont  arrangements  of  tho  record  undulations 
or  vibrations  involvos  difforont  procedures  in  carrying 
out  tho  rooording  process,  and  tho  formation  of  tho  record 
groovos  in  a  certain  shape  and  arrangomont  is  accordingly 
thought  to  be  properly  a  part  of  the  process,  1’ho  more 
fact  that  a  process  may  bo  quasi-mechanical  in  its  naturo 
does  not  rondor  it  unpatentable.  Tho  patent  to  Klein  does 
not  show  an  arrangement  of  record  grooves  as  specified  in 
the  claims  in  ouestion,  one  of  Klein's  groovos  D  boing  a 
guido  groovo  and  not  a  record  groovo  (boo  linos  39  to  42 
of  Klein' 8  specification). 

Claims  g,  3  and  6  differentiate  from  tho  referen¬ 
ces  of  record  by  specifying  tho  step  of  isolating  tho 
vibrations  from  ono  source  from  tho  vibrations  from  another 
source.  In  all  of  the  references,  somo  of  tho  vibrations 
intended  for  oaoh  recording  instrument  are  permitted  to 
commingle  with  and  booomo  rocordod  with  tho  vibrations 
inton  sod  for  other  rooording  instruments.  As  tho  isolation 
of  tho  vibrations  as  spoolfiod  in  those  claims  is  tho  most 
important  object  of  applicant's  invention,  tho  importance 
thereof  in  applicant's  process  is  obvious. 

Claims  4  and  5  differentiate  from  tho  references 
by  specifying  the  stop  of  causing  tho  omission  in  soparato 
sound  proof  compartments  of  sound  vibrations  from  each  of 
a  plurality  of  sources.  Tho  remarks  raado  above  in  con¬ 
nection  with  claimc  2,  3  and  6  apply  equally  well  to 


claims  4  and  5.  Referring  to  the  Examiner's  o'bjoctlon  to 
the  last  named  olaina ,  it  io  thought  that  thoro  io  no 
objeotionable  reference  to  apparatus  in  thooe  claimo. 

Tho  expression  "causing  tho  omission  in  soparato  sound 
proof  compartmonte,  oto."  Btatos ,  it  io  submitted,  a  true 
process  stop,  tho  sound  proof  oompartmont  hoing  specified 
to  facilitate  an  accurato  description  of  this  otep. 

Tho  claims  arc  thought  to  bo  patentable,  and 
reconsideration  and  allowance  arc  respectfully  roquonted, 
Rospootfully  subraittod, 

THOMAS  A.  EDISON, 

By 

his  Attorney. 7 


Orange,  ITow  Jersey, 
April  1915. 

FB-K.UK 


Div&3- 


Paper  -Re  j-.- 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 

UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 

WASH  INGTON  . June--®  ;-19i3v- 


J?rarik  L.  Dyer, . 

. Orange,- How- J ersey  • 


O.S.  PATENT  OFFICE, 

JUN  3  1913 

MAILED. 


Please  find  below  a  con 

-Thomas  A.  Edison 


nmnnication  from  the  EXAMINER  in  charge  of  the  application  of 
. aorialnumher-ei7',OtMv-fiTed--K&ych-'29,T911V 


for  Talking--  Jfechliws  -  - . 


ThiB  action  is  responsive  to  the  amendment  filed  April  25, 


1913  Claim  1  is  rejected  on  Tore, French  patent,  Feb.  15,1910, 

412, %at,  (101-3).  Ho  invention  is  found  in  arranging  his  grooves 
as  in  Berliner, Ootoher  12,1909,  936,976,  Uol-17)^ •  See  also 
Couade.Prenoh  patent,  ^eo.  11,1907  ,  384.! 921,  (181-3). 

Claim  1  is  also  rejected  on  the  references  of  record  for 
the  reasons  of  record  .  The  arrangement  of  the  spiral  is 
patentably  immaterial  .especially  as  respects  the  process,  ’he 
prooess  of  the  references  being  the  same  as  applicant's. 

Claims  2,  3,  4  and  5  are  rejected  on  Tore*  also  on  the 
references  of  record  for  the  reasonB  of  record.  See  especially 


ly  as  regards  the  prooess,  that  of  the  references  so  far  as  the 
process  is  concerned,  being  the  same  as  applicant's  • 

Claim  6  is  rejected  on  Tore;  also  on  the  referenoes  and 
reasons  of  record,  in  connection  with  the  reasons  set  out  in  the 
rejection  of  olaim  1.. 


Patent  Series 
Patent  Application  Files 

Folio  #  723  Talking  Machines  (Case  B) 

Serial#:  617675 

Primary  Applicant:  Edison,  Thomas  A 

Date  Executed:  3/28/1911 


petition. 


tije  Commissioner  of  patents: 

£our petitioner  thouas  a.  ’sfoiaorr, 
a  citizen  of  tfje  ®niteb  States,  teSibing  anb  Ijabing  a  $oSt  Office  abbress  at 

Llewellyn  Park,  West  Orange,  -Essex  County,  New  Jersey, 


prapfi  tfjat  letters  patent  map  be  granteb  to  fjim  for  tfje  improbements  in 


-TALKING  MACJII2IES- 


set  forty  in  tlje  annexeb  Specification ;  anb  Ije  fjerebp  appoints  Jfranfe  X.  ©per 
(Registration  JJo.  560),  of  ©range,  J2eto  5«^p,  Ijis  attornep,  toitfj  full 
potoer  of  substitution  anb  rebocation,  to  prosecute  tijis  application,  to  make 
alterations  anb  ainenbnicnts  therein,  to  receibe  tije  patent,  anb  to  transact  all 
business  in  tije  patent  Office  connected  tljeretoitfj. 


SPECIFICATION. 


ij  TO  ALL  WHOM  IT  -SAY  CONCERN: 

j  BE  IT  KNOWN,  that  I,  THOMAS  A.  EDISON,  a 

;  citizen  of  the  United  States  and  a  resident  of  Llewellyn 
|  Parle,  West  Orange,  in  the  County  of  Essex  and  State  of 
New  Jersey,  have  invented  certain  new  and  useful  inqprove- 
ments  in  TALKING  MACHINES,  of  which  the  following  is 
|l  a  description; 

jj  My  invention  relates  to  talking  machines 

jj  and  more  particularly  to  an  Improved  method  and  means 
j!  for  recording  composite  sound  productions  such  as  are 
||  produced,  for  example,  hy  a  singer  and  acoompaniBt. 
ij  It  has  heretofore  been  the  practise  to  record 

jj  only  the  resultant  sound  produced  hy  the  combination  of 
|  the  sounds  from  the  various  sources  of  the  composite  pro- 
j{  duotion,  ThiB  method  is  ohj  ectionable  in  that  the 
jj  superposition  of  the  undulations  corresponding  to  the 
jj  sounds  from  each  source  produces  a  very  irregular  record 
j  inpresBion  which  it  is  difficult  to  accurately  trace  with 
jj  a  reproducing  stylus}  so  that  when  a  record  thus  formed 
jj  is  reproduced,  the  distinctness  of  the  individual  parts 
jj  of  the  composite  sound  production  is  necessarily  more  or 
jj  less  destroyed  so  as  to  render  it  impossible  to  give 
jj  desired  prominence  and  distinctness  to  any  particular 
i|  part,  for  example,  that  of  a  singer  or  other  soloist. 


*1" 


j 

j 


In  my  conpanion  application  for  letters  Paten/ 
entitled  "Talking  Machines"  filed  on  even  date  herewith, 

I  have  described  a  method  and  means  for  overcoming  this 
objection.  VSy  present  invention  is  a  modification  of 
that  described  in  said  companion  application.  In  the 
method  disclosed  in  this  application,  I  record  the  parts 
of  the  composite  sound  on  separate  record  blanks  prefer¬ 
ably  by  mounting  these  blanks  on  separate  machines  placed 
in  separate  compartments ,  the  said  machines  being  driven 
in  synchronism  by  any  suitable  means.  I  can  then  re¬ 
produce  the  composite  production  by  reproducing  the 
resultant  records  on  separate  machines  driven  in  synchron¬ 
ism.  In  addition  to  my  improved  method,  my  invention 
comprises  simple  and  efficient  means  for  carrying  the 
same  into  effect.  Other  objects  of  my  invention  will 
appear  more  fully  in  the  following  specification  and 
appended  claims. 

In  order  that  my  invention  may  be  more  fully 
understood,  attention  is  hereby  directed  to  the  accompany¬ 
ing  drawings  forming  part  of  this  specification  and  in 
which  - 


r* 


Ij  Figure  1  represents  a  plan  view  partly  in 

section  of  the  preferred  embodiment  of  my  recording  meanB; 

!|  Figure  2  represents  a  front  elevation  of  the 

|  device  shown  in  Figure  1,  part  of  said  device  being  shown 
j  in  section  taken  on  line  2-2  of  Figure  1;  and 
|  Figure  3  represents  a  plan  view  of  my  preferred  j 

ij  reproducing  means. 

|  In  all  of  the  views,  like  parts  are  designated 


by  the  same  reference  numerals, 


i  fief  erring  to  figures  1  and  2,  the  numerals 

1  and  2  represent  two  adjacent  rooms  or  compartments  aepar- 
ated  by  a  wall  £  having  mounted  therein  a  window  _4  per¬ 
il  mitting  vision  from  one  compartment  to  the  other.  The 
jj  numerals  5  and  6_  represent  the  side  walls  and  the  numeral 
|  7  the  top  wall  of  the  compartments.  In  each  compartment 
I  is  placed  a  talking  machine  These  machines,  in  the  ! 

|j  form  of  my  invention  disclosed,  are  xjrovided  with  dovm-  j 

!!  wardly  turned  flanges  9  secured  hy  a  rivet  or  other  j 

j!  securing  means  10  to  the  partition  wall  3  of  the  oompart-  - 

j|  ment.  Each  machine  is  provided  with  a  table  or  support  j 

|  11  for  a  record  or  blank  12  and  is  secured  to  and  rotat-  j 
\  able  with  a  shaft  13.  The  shaft  13  of  one  of  the  machines. 

Si  for  example,  that  in  the  compartment  2  as  shown,  is 
|j  connected  with  and  rotated  by  a  motor  mounted  in  a  casing 
|  14  depending  from  the  base  of  the  corresponding  machine, 
jj  Mounted  in  a  bearing  3'  in  the  wall  3  is  a  horizontal 
jj  shaft  15  having  secured  at  its  opposite  ends  bevel  gears 
jj  16  and  17 .  The  gear  IB  meshes  with  the  bevel  gear  IS  j 
j!  secured  to  the  shaft  13  of  the  machine  in  compartment  1,  J 

jj  and  the  gear  17  with  the  bevel  gear  19  secured  to  the  j 

jj  shaft  13  in  the  compartment  2.  By  means  of  the  above 

described  connecting  gearing,  the  record  supports  or  tables 
11  are  rotated  in  synchronism  by  the  motor  in  the  casing 
14. 

!  Each  maohine  is  provided  with  a  recorder  20 

!  mounted  in  a  traveling  carriage  21  which  is  pivotally 
i  and  slidably  mounted  at  its  rear  end  on  the  horizontal 
rod  22  mounted  in  brackets  22’ ,  the  said  oarriageAslidahly 
supported  at  its  forward  end  by  the  straight  edge  23. 

i 

jj  "3" 


■ 


yor  feeding  the  carriage  hi  across  the  record  12  trans- 
I  vorsely  of  the  record  groove,  a  nut  214  is  secured  at  one 
|!  end  of  the  spring  arm  25  which  latter  is  secured  at  its 
|  opposite  end  to  the  carriage  211,  the  feed  nut  2£  being 
i|  adapted  to  engage  a  feed  3 crew  26  mounted  in  the  brackets 
I  22i  on  the  base  of  the  machine.  As  is  common  in  devices 
jj  of  this  kind,  the  feed  nut  engages  only  the  upper  portion 
jj  of  the  screw  26;  so  that  as  the  carriage  21  is  lifted  at 
|  its  forward  end  to  remove  the  reproducer  from  the  record, 

|j  tiie  feed  nut  disengages  from  the  feed  screw.  For  rotat- 
jj  ing  the  various  feed  screws  in  synchronism,  each  screw  has 
|  secured  thereto,  a  spiral  gear  27  engaged  by  a  corres- 
ji  ponding  gear  28  secured  to  the  shaft  16.  The  feed 
!j  screw  and  gears  27  and  28  for  one  compartment  are  prefer- 
j  ably  identical  with  the  corresponding  parts  for  the  other 
||  compartment,  as  shown;  so  that  a  uniform  feed  is  obtained 

ij  in  all  the  machines  enroloyed  in  my  invention.  This 

! 

i!  construction,  however,  is  not  necessary  as  my  invention 
|  could  be  carried  out  by  the  U3S  of  feeds  having  any  de- 
j|  sired  ratio  to  each  other  30  long  as  two  machines  operated 
j!  in  synchronism.  Each  reproducer  has  secured  thereto  a 
ij  sound  conveyor  29. 

ij  'In  using  the  apparatus  described  abovo  in 

|  carrying  out  my  Invention,  the  singer  or  other  source  of 
Ij  the  sound  to  which  it  is  desired  to  give  most  prominence 
j  is  plaoed  facing  the  exit  of  the  sound  conveyor  in  one 
j of  the  compartments,  as  at  a  in  Figure  1.  The  orchestra 
j  or  other  source  or  sources  of  sound  is  placed  in  front 
of  the  exit  of  the  other  sound  conveyor,  as  at  b  in  com- 
j  part  men?,  2.  The  record  blank  having  bean  placed  upon  the 

"4" 


! 


tables 


or  supports  11  and  the  motor  in  the  casing  14  having 
been  set  into  operation,  a  director  gives  the  signal 
|  through  the  window  4  for  bringing  the  two  sources  of  ; 

|  sound  into  time  with  eaoh  other.  The  rooms  or  compart-  j 
j  ments  1  and  2  being  sound  tight,  the  sound  from  the  i 

I  sources  a  and  b  are  independently  recorded  upon  the  record  j 
j  blanks  in  the  corresponding  compartments. 

■When  it  is  desired  to  reproduce  the  original 
ij  production,  the  resultant  records  are  placed  upon  the 
jj  tables  30  (see  Jig.  3)  of  a  plurality  of  machines  31 
ji  driven  in  synchronism  by  any  preferred  type  of  connecting 
5  gearing  32.  The  reproducers  33  having  been  placed  at  j 
■j  the  starting  point  of  the  various  records  each  of  the  j 

ji  latter  when  rotated  by  its  support  causes  the  corresponding  j 
ij  reproducer  to  give  forth  through  the  sound  conveying  arm  j 
|j  34  and  the  sound  amplifier  35  into  the  atmosphere,  the  j 
■j  sounds  which  were  recorded  in  the  compartments  JL  and  2.  j 
ij  As  the  records  are  synchronously  rotated  during  both  the  j 
ij  recording  and  the  reproducing,  the  various  sounds  are 
j|  blended  into  the  perfeot  harmony  which  existed  during  the 
process  of  recording.  Furthermore,  as  the  regularity 
of  the  undulations  impressed  in  the  record  recorded  in 
!  the  compartment  1  is  not  destroyed  by  the  superposition 
of  the  undulations  from  the  sound  in  the  compartment  2, 
the  sound  produced  in  compartment  1  can  be  reproduced 
with  a  high  degree  of  distinctness.  In  addition  to  this 
advantage,  the  use  of  separate  reoord  grooves  and  repro- 
i  ducers  greatly  increase  the  volume  of  the  sound  given  j 


»5' 


forth. 


While  I  have  included  the  claims  for  my  in¬ 
vention  in  its  broadest  aspect  in  my  companion  application 
referred  to  above  and  while  X  have  inoluded  in  this 
application  only  such  claims  as  are  patentahly  different 
from  the  disclosure  made  in  the  said  companion  application 
many  modifications  may  he  made  in  the  specific  structure 
and  in  the  method  herein  disclosed  -without  departing  from 


j 


the  spirit  of  my  invention. 

What  I  claim  an  new  and  desire  to  secure  by 
Letters  Patent  of  the  United  States  is  as  follows; 

'//V^ ' 

1.  In  a  device  of  the  class  described,  the  com¬ 
bination  of  a  plurality  of  rotatable  record  supports, 
a  sound\box  for  each  support,  and  means  for  rotating  said 
supports\in  synchronism,  each  of  said  sound  boxes  having 
an  independent  sound  conveyor  connected  therewith,  sub¬ 
stantially^  set  forth. 

3.  a  device  of  the  class  described,  the  com¬ 

bination  of  k  plurality  of  rotatable  record  supports, 
a  sound  box  fVr  each  support,  means  for  rotating  said 
supports  in  synchronism,  and  means  for  producing  a 
relative  feeding  movement  between  3aid  sound  boxes  and 
said  supports,  etch  of  said  sound  boxes  having  an  inde¬ 
pendent  sound  conveyor,  substantially  as  set  forth. 

3.  In  a  device  of  the  class  described,  the 
combination  of  a  plurality  of  rotatable  record  supports, 
a  recorder  for  each  support,  means  for  rotating  said 
supports  in  synchronism,  and  independent  sound  conveyors 
for  the  respective  reorders,  substantially  as  set  forth 


i  device  of  the  class  described,  the  com¬ 
bination  of  a  plurality  of  ooi.par  tiuen  fca ,  a  rotatable 
record  Bupport  and  a  roc or dor  therefor  in  each  compartment, 
and  noivL  for  rotating  said  record  support b  in  synchronism, 
ibstant\ally  as  sat  forth, 

^Tn  a  device  of  the  class  described,  the  com¬ 
bination  oi  a  plurality  of  compartments,  a  rotatable 
record  support  and  a  recorder  therefor  in  each  compart¬ 
ment,  means  Yor  rotating  one  of  said  record  supports,  and 
means  connect W  said  supports  for  synchronous  rotation, 
substantially  Ws  set  forth. 

Wvice  of  the  class  described, 
hination  of  a  plurality  of  compartments ,  a  rotatable 
|  record  support  and  a  recorder  therefor  in  each  compartment 
jj  means  for  rotating  one  of  said  record  supports,  and 
I  gearing  connecting  said  supports  for  synchronou: 
fj  substantially  as  s^t  for 

■I  7 1  in  a  device  of  the  class  doscribed,  the  com-  | 

bination  of  a  plurality  of  compartments,  a  rotatable  j 

record  support  and  a  Vecorder  therefor  in  each  compartment , j 
means  for  rotating  ond  of  said  record  supports,  means  j 

connecting  said  supports  for  synobronous  rotation,  and  j 
means  connected  with  slid  second  named  means  for  producing 
a  synchronous  feeding  movement  transversely  of  the  record 
grooves  between  each  of \said  recorders  and  its  record 
support,  substantially  afe  set  forth. 


8 .  In  a  device  of 


the  class  described,  the  com- 
Jf  compartments,  a  rotatable 


bination  of  a  plurality 


record  Support  and  a  recorder  therefor  in  each  compartment, 
means  for\rotating  one  of  said  record  supports,  gearing 
conneoting\aid  supports  for  synchronous  rotation,  and 
means  connected  with  said  gearing  for  producing  a  syn¬ 
chronous  feeding  movement  transversely  of  the  record 
grooves  between  Wch  of  said  recorders  and  its  record 
support,  substantially  as  set  forth. 

$.  The  process  of  recording  composite  sound 
|j  productions  composed  of  sounds  emanating  from  a  plurality 
of  different  sources  which  consists  in  simultaneously 
recording  on  separat-e^synohror.oisnly  driven  record  blanks 
the  Bound  from  each  r.ourc'e.,  r.ubnt.  anti  ally  as  sot  forth. 


ji  jq,  The  method  of  recording  composite  sound  pro- 

|j  auctions  which  consists  in  producing  impendent  mechanicalj 
i|  vibrations  corresponding  to  the  sound  from  each  oi  several! 
j!  sources,  and  simultaneously  iSpressj-ng  these  vibrations 
|  in  separate  synchronously  rotated  record  blanks,  sub- 
stant  la'll: 


as  set  forth. 

&S  (j  ?<•  ■ 


•3  -  4 


®ji£f  specification  sigtteb  anb  toitneSSeb  tljis  <2  bap  of  9 1 1 

Mlitnessetlj: 

. y)  ■ . 

2. .  /d&t*£wryy/ . 


®atb. 


g>tate  of  iicbi  f  ersep  ] 
Countp  of  €SSex  j 


Thomas  a  .  TiDi son  ,  tljc  atiobc  namcb 
petitioner,  being  bnhj  Stuorn,  beposes  anb  SapS  tfjat  ije  is  a  citijcn  of  tfje  Unitcb 
States,  anb  a  ICSibent  Of  Llewellyn  Pari.,  West  Orange,  Essex  County, 


New  Jersey, 


tijat  fje  berilij  beliebes  fjimseelf  to  be  tfje  original,  first  anb  sole  inbentor  of  tljc 
iinprobemcnts  in  talking  machines 


bescribcb  anb  claimeb  in  tfje  anttexeb  specification ;  tijat  Ije  boes  not  bnotu  anb 
boes  not  beliebe  tijat  tfje  Same  bias  eber  Unobm  or  nseb  before  Ijis  inbention  or 
biscoberp  thereof ;  or  patenteb  or  beScribeb  in  anp  printeb  publication  in  the 
Uniteb  states  of  America  or  anp  foreign  countrp  before  Ijis  inbention  or 
biscoberp  thereof,  or  more  tljan  tbio  pears  prior  to  tfjis  application;  or  patenteb 
in  anp  countrp  foreign  to  tljc  Uniteb  States  on  an  application  fileb  more  tljan 
tluelbe  montljs  prior  to  tljis  application;  or  in  public  use  or  on  Sale  in  tfje 
Unitcb  States  for  more  tljan  tluo  pears  prior  to  tljis  application;  anb  tijat  no 
application  for  patent  upon  Saib  inbention  has  been  fileb  bp  fjfnt  or  Ijis  legal 
representatibes  or  assigns  in  anp  foreign  countrp. 

\/^Ltnsis!  -Si 


tfteal] 


Stuorn  to  anb  subscribeb  before  me  tljis  °2  ^bap  of  91  f 

.  f. 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 

UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 


WASHINGTON  May  .3,  103.1 . 

th oi«an  A.  Edison,  '  >  •  , 

C/o  Frank  D,  Dyoi-,  !  ■ 

Orango ,  How  Jersey. 

Hence  find  below  a  communication  from  the  EXAMINER  in  charge  of  your  application. 

Sor.  Ho.  017,0713,  filed  J/.nr.  29,  193.1,  for  Talking  Machines. 


The  proper  serial  number  should  be  given  at  the  top  of 
po.ge  2.  3'  is  not  on  the  drawing. 

Clai.fis  1  to  8  inclusive  u.ro  druwn  to  a  talking  machine, 
while  claims  9  and  10  are  drawn  to  a  proeoBS.  Division  is  required 
according  to  the  provisions  of  Kulc  48. 

In  addition  to  the  art  cited  in  applicant’s  companion 
application  applicant  should  see  Davis,  Way  24,  1910,  958,730 
(181-14);  Prescott,  July  26,  1910,  965,330  {181-16) . 


in  THE  UITITEP  STATES  PAT  Ell  T  OFFICE. 


THOMAS  A.  ED  I  Sait  * 
TALKIHG  MAC  III1IKS , 
Serial  Ho.  617,675, 


Eoorn  llo.  379 


Filed  March  29,  1911  ) 

HOI!  OK  ABLE  COMMISSIOHEH  OF  FAT  HITS, 

8  15: 

In  response  to  Office  action  of  May  5,  1911 
pi  cane  amend  the  above  entitled  ease  ns  follows: 

In  line  1,  pago  after  "Patent"  insert 
-  Serial  Ho.  617,674  -  . 

In  lino  4,  claim  10,  change  "impressing" 
to  -  recording  -  . 

Cancel  claims  1  to  8  inclusive  and  change 
the  numerals  of  9  and  10  to  1  and  2  respectively. 

Add  the  following  claims: 

/ 

The  method  of  rocording  sound  vibrations 
|j  simultaneously  emitted  from  a  plurality  of_  sources  which. 


["'consists  in 

I  A 


a  A>"  •-*  '* 

n . thn  othey -  B ouroefl— t  o  a 


i  separate  recording  instrument,  and  in  simultaneously  and 
synchronously  recording  the  sound  vibrations  ,jPs*em  the 
various  -oeweee  on  separate  synchronously  driven  record 
blanks,  substantially  as  set  forth. 

<&* 

The  method  of  recording  composite  sound  pro- 
|  auctions  which  consists  in  causing  the  emission  in  separate 
|j  sound-proof  compartments  of  sound  vibrations  from  each  of 
a  plurality  of  sound  sources,  in  conveying  the  sound 
ij  vibrations  from  each  of  the  compartments  independently  of 


those  from  the  Other  compartments  to  separate  recording 
Lears,  and  in  then  simultaneously  anil  synchronously  rocorclin 
I  the  different  sets  of  sound  vibrations  on  separate  oyn- 
!!  ohronously  driven  record  blanks,  substantially  as  set  forth 


remarks 

The  Examiner  is  respectfully  requested  to  apply 
the  reference  numeral  5'  to  the  drawings  to  indicate  the 
bearing  in- the  wall  3. for  the  shaft  18. 

All  of  the  claims  now  in  the  case  are  drawn  to 
applicant's  process;  and  action  on  the  mei its  thereof  is 
accordingly  respectfully  reoucstod.  fh'.  right  is 
reserved  to  file  a  divisional  application  on  the  subject 
|  matter  of  the  cunceled  claims. 

Itoopectfully  submitted, 

THOMAS  A.  EE I SOU , 


Orange,  Rev?  Jersey, 


J.H.D.-S.  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 

UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 
^  WASHINGTON  May  i?*19*2* 

Thomas  A.  Edison, 

Cure  Trank  L.  Dyer, 

Orange,  New  Jersey  . 


'lease  find  below  a  communication  from  the  EXAMINER  in  charge  of  your  a fipli cation. 

for  Talking  Machines, filed  March  29,1911,Berial  number  617,675  . 


O.S.  PATWT  OFFICE, 

im<  131912 

MAILED. 


This  aotion  is  responsive  to  the  amendment  filed  April  9, 


Claim s  1,  2  an 
),0&8,  (181-2), 


und  3  are  rejected  upon  Hill, October  2,1900, 
and  also  as  not  patent, ably  distinguishing 


#659, 

from,  ^ 

Maodonald.Ootober  21,1902,  #711,706,(181-2); 

Jungren, June  20, 1911, #995, 6$), (181-3) ,  o y' 

Hobson, Eng.  patent, June  15, 1907, #13,^8,  (101-3) . 

Claim  4  is  rejected  upon  the  oited  art.  The  degree  of 
-'isolation  ::  of  the  performers  is  held  not  to  be  patentabl^ 
material  so  far  as  applicant's  process  is  concerned.  Moreover, 
claim  4  la  objeotionuble  as  defining  the  prooess  by  the  apparatus 
employed. 


Ill  SH8  UHISED  iJSATBS  PATI'HT  W3H0R. 


THOMAS  A.  RDXSOII,  ) 

TAIKIHG  MACHINES,  ) 

Ho  on  Ho. ' 379 . 

Piled  March  29,  1911,  ) 

Serial  Mo.  617,673.  ) 

HOMO" ABLE  C0HIJI3SI0NKB  OP  FATBITSS , 

S  I  Is 

In  response  to  the  Office  action  of  May  13, 
1912,  please  amend  the  above  entitled  ease  as  foil onus 
Cancel  claims  1  and  2. 

Claim  3,  linos  3  and  <1,  ehango  "convoying 
the  vibrations  from  oach  of  the  sources  independently 
of  those  from  the  other  sourcos"  to  -  isolating  the 
vibrations  fron  one  source  from  the  vibrations  from  another 
soxirco,  convoying  each  isolated  set  of  vibrations  -  ;  in 
lino  6,  same  claim,  ohange  "from"  to  -  in  -  ;  and  in  line 
7,  samo  olaim,  ahango  "sources"  to  -  sets  -  . 

Change  tho  numerals  of  claims  3  and  4  to 
1  and  2  respectively. 

I'  Claim  1  differentiates  from  tho  references 
of  reoord  by  specifying  the  stop  of  isolating  tho  vibrations 
from  ono  source  from  the  vibrations  from  another  source.  In 
the  disclosure  of  all  tho  references,  some  of  tho  vibrations 
intended  for  each  recording  instrument  are  permitted  to 
commingle  with  and  to  become  recorded  with  vibrations 
/  intended  for  other  recording  instruments.  As  the  isolation 
!■  of  the  vibrations  as  specified  in  this  claim  is  tho  most 
important  object  of  applicant's  invention,  tho  importance 


thoroof  in  .applicant's  procoos  is  obvious. 

Claim  2  difforontiatos  from  tho  roforonoos  t>y 
specifying  the  step  of  oauoing  tho  oniBBion  in  soparato 
sound  proof  compartments  of  sound  vibrations  from  each 
of  a  plurality  of  Bound  oourooo.  Tho  remarks  made  above 
in  connection  with  claim  1  apply  o anally  to  claim  2. 
Referring  to  the  Examinor's  objootion  to  claim  2,  it  is 
thought  that  thoro  is  no  oh jaetionablo  roforonco  to 
apparatus  in  this  claim.  Bit©  expression  "causing  tho 
omission  in  separate  sound  proof  compartments  of  sound 
vihrationB  otc."  states,  it  is  submitted,  a  true  process 
j  step,  tho  sound  proof  compartment  being  specified  to 
facilitate  an  accurate  description  of  this  step* 


Tho  claims  are  thought  to  be  patentable  and 
reconsideration  and  allowance  are  respectfully  requested. 

Respectfully  submitted, 

THOU AO  A.  EDI 3011 , 

OLj^e.  £&,-*** 


Orange,  hew  Jersey, 
April  1913. 


Div.  ..23....  Boom  37-9- 


•  Sut.  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 

UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 

WASHINGTON  . Juna..- 


Trunk  I.. .Dyer, . 

. Orange ,. -Now.. Jersey  . 


O.S.  PATENT  OFFICE, 

JUN  3  1913 

MAILED. 


Please  find  below  a  communication  from  the  EXAMINER  in  charge  of  the  application  of 

■Thomas  A*  -Edison-, - serial-number— 61.7.,.675,— £iled~l£ar-ah-29.  ,1911,— .. 


...for-Talking-Machines-. 


This  action  is  responsive  to  the  amendment  filed  April 
25,1913  . 

Claims  1  and  2  are  rejected  on  the  references  of  record,  in 
view  of  Tore,Trenoh  patent, Teh.  15,1910,  412,688,  (181-3). 

Claims  1  and  2  are  alBO  rejected  on  the  references  of  reoord 
for  the  reasons  of  reoord.  The  degree  of  isolation  of  the  setB 
of  sound  vibrations  is  held  patentably  immaterial  especially 
so  far  as  the  process  is  concerned  .  The  process  of  the 
references  of  record  is  the  same  as  that  empiayed,by  applicant, 
see  also  Couade, Trench  patent, Deo.  11, 1 907, 384, -921, ( 181^3 )• 
Attention  is  also  directed  to  Wooster, Nov.  9,1909,939,781, 
(181-3),  and  -nerliner.Teh.  4,1902,692,5(12^(181-3). 


Patent  Series 
Patent  Application  Files 

Folio  #  728  Sound-Box 

U.S.  Patent#:  1078266 

Primary  Applicant:  Edison,  Thomas  A 


Date  Executed:  4/3/1911 


yu.C&£*>  *-r  #-*■■/. 

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tu..yU.oi'-^i  7)uu- 

J^.CCt.^L.l . r-u  i.  •<?.<£  ££ttsu~i.j 


Patent  Series 
Patent  Application  Files 

Folio#  731  Production  of  Nickel  Hydroxid 

U.S.  Patent#:  1167484 

Primary  Applicant:  Edison,  Thomas  A 


Date  Executed: 


4/7/1911 


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Ur.  Edison: - 


a,  ii.  i; 

a 

gQEIO  751.  PROSUOTIOa  OE  HICkTh  HYDHO^ 


This  is  the  application  which  you  instructed  me  this 
morning  to  abandon.  X  am  writing  this  memorandum  to  make  sure 
that  I  have  explained  the  situation  to  you  completely. 

This  application  is  one  of  three  which  were  filed  on 
the  same  day.  The  other  two  have  gone  to  patent  as  follows :- 

Ho.  1,083,355,  for  process  of  forming  nickel  hydroxide 
or  other  insoluble  chemical  compound  by  a  certain  dry  method. 

Ho.  1,083,356,  for  process  and  product  for  an  active 
material  made  up  of  nickel  hydroxide  with  a  small  percentage  of 
cobalt  hydroxide  formed  by  drying  the  precipitated  pulp  and  there¬ 
after  removing  the  insoluble  reaction  products. 

In  each  of  these  patents  there  is  a  reference  to  the 
application  now  under  consideration,  and  I  consider  that  the  pro¬ 
cess  of  the  present  application  is  substantially  disclosed  in 
patent  Ho.  1,083,356.  Copies  of  these  patents  are  submitted 
herewith.  If  I  am  correct  in  this  opinion,  you  will  not  be  able 
to  keep  the  process  of  the  application  under  consideration  secret 
by  abandoning  it. 

Very  good  process  claims  have  been  allowed  in  this  appli¬ 
cation,  and  the  only  question  remaining  to  be  settled  is  that  of 
the  product  claims.  In  view  of  these  circumstances,  I  should 
think  it  would  pay  you  to  take  out  this  patent  even  with  only 
process  claims  in  it,  as  this  would  afford  you  a  certain  measure 
of  protection  at  least.  In  our  last  amendment,  we  asked  for  the 


allowance  of  six  product  claims, 
number  to,  say,  three,  and  change 
may  get  something  allowed  on  the  product,  and  X  should  recommend 
making  an  effort  to  get  at  least  such  product  claims  allowed  as 
can  be  obtained  without  going  to  the  expense  of  an  appeal. 

If  you  should  change  your  decision  in  this  matter,  we 
will  have  to  act  promptly  as  the  amendment  must  be  received  in 
the  Patent  Office  not  later  than  Jane  16th.  An  amendment  for 
this  purpose  has  already  been  prepared  and  is  ready  to  be  mailed. 

While  X  agree  with  you  that  it  is  difficult  to  prove 
infringement  of  patents  of  this  character  and  that  in  many  cases 
better  protection  is  obtained  by  keeping  the  process  secret,  I 
do  not  think  this  consideration  is  applicable  to  the  application 
under  consideration  because  of  patent  Ho.  1,083,356  referred  to 
above,  which  has  already  been  published. 


Possibly,  if  we  reduce  bhe 
the  form  of  some  of  them,  we 


HL-JS 


Patent  Series 
Patent  Application  Files 

Folio  #  732  Storage  Battery 

U.S.  Patent#:  1083356 

Primary  Applicant:  Edison,  Thomas  A 
Date  Executed:  4/7/1 91 1 


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. 


Patent  Series 


Patent  Application  Files 


Folio#  733  Art  of  Forming  Chemical  Compounds 


U.S.  Patent#:  1083355 

Primary  Applicant:  Edison,  Thomas  A 
Date  Executed:  4/7/1911 


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Folio#  743 

U.S.  Patent#: 
Primary  Applicant: 
Date  Executed: 


Patent  Series 
Patent  Application  Files 


Art  of  Separating  Copper  from  Other  Metals 
1050629 

Edison,  Thomas  A 
5/1/1911 


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Patent  Series 
Patent  Application  Files 

Folio  #  745  Art  of  Separating  Copper  from  Other  Metals 

U.S.  Patent#:  1050630 

Primary  Applicant:  Edison,  Thomas  A 
Date  Executed:  5/12/1911 


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Patent  Series 


Patent  Application  Files 


Folio  #  748  Reproducer 

U.S.  Patent#:  1055621 

Primary  Applicant:  Edison,  Thomas  A 


Date  Executed:  5/1 6/1 91 1 


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.  ce*Tr 


Patent  Series 
Patent  Application  Files 

Folio  #  756  Battery  Charge  Indication 

U.S.  Patent#:  1045291 

Primary  Applicant:  Holland,  Walter  E 
Date  Executed:  6/6/1911 


MEMORANDUM 


Hr.  Smith:  i2/39/X0- 

Ref erring  to  the  attached  memorandum,  please  get  an 
extra  copy  of  the  Apple  patent  so  that  X  can  take  it  up  with 
"Ite.  Edison^  'i  do  not  think  it  would  ho  worth  while  going  into 
this  matter  unless  v/e  bought  the  patent,  assuming  that  it  is 
infringed. 

EID/l  TO  |  1.  D. 


K-  - 


0'^^> 


t 


Mr.  Dyer:- 

Mr.  Edison's,  or  rather  Mr.  Walter  Holland's  inven¬ 
tion  on  the  device  for  indicating  when  a  storage  battery  is 
nearly  fully  charged  hy  means  of  counting  the  bubbles  of  gas 
passing  through  a  fluid  reservoir  per  second,  is  anticipated 
by  the  patent  to  Apple,  Ho.  952,087,  in  the  Storage  Battery 
Binder,  which  I  hand  you.  You  will  note  that  Claim  2  of  this 
patent  dominates  our  structure.  Will  you  please  advise  me 
whether  you  think  any  steps  should  be  taken  to  purchase  the 
Apple  patent. 

Our  structure  is  much  more  practical  than.  Apple’ s, 
and  I  think  we  might  file  a  specific  application  on  our  im¬ 
proved  apparatus.  Ab  to  the  idea  of  indicating  the  condition 
of  the  charge  directly  by  a  pointer  and  a  scale,  on  which  I 
developed  several  ideas,  as  X  told  you,  Mr.  Edison  says  that 
they  had  tried  similar  schemes  and  found  them  impractical  on 
account  of  the  clogging  of  the  paBsageB  with  the  potash  from 
the  battery  solution.  However,  I  should  think  we  might  file 
applications  on  some  such  ideas. 


.  DS-JS 


Patent  Series 
Patent  Application  Files 

Folio  #  755  Method  of  Making  Molds  for  Sound  Records 

U.S.  Patent#:  1118114 

Primary  Applicant:  Edison,  Thomas  A 
Date  Executed:  6/8/1911 


Patent  Application  Files 


Folio  #  757  Combined  Filling  and  Gas  Valve  for  Storage  Batteries 

U.S.  Patent#:  1165100 

Primary  Applicant:  Holland,  Walter  E 


Date  Executed:  6/15/1911 


Patent  Series 


Patent  Application  Files 


Folio  #  759  Safety  Device  for  Secondary  Cells 

U.S.  Patent#:  1116893 

Primary  Applicant:  Hutchison,  Miller  Reese 

Date  Executed:  6/19/1911 


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Mr.  Hutchison:-  V  ^  ^  W  ^  J\  ^  X|£  <T 

I  hand  you  herewith  the  file  of  Folio  759 ,  whioh  is  an 
applioation  filed  in  your  name  for  Safety  Devioes  for  Secondary 
Cells.  This  application  was  allowed  August  7,  1914  with  the 
following  claims :- 


1.  In  apparatus  of  the  character  described,  the  com¬ 
bination  with  a  battery  cell,  of  fluid -containing  means  for 
extinguishing  the  flame  of  an  internal  explosion  in  said 
oell,  and  means  for  indicating  the  ooourrenoe  of  suoh  ex¬ 
plosion,  comprising  a  member  adapted  to  be  displaced  to 
operative  position  by  passage  of  gas  in  excess  of  a  pre¬ 
determined  pressure  through  said  fluid-containing  means, 
substantially  as  described. 

2.  In  apparatus  of  the  character  described,  the 
combination  with  a  battery  oell,  of  a  fluid -containing 
vessel  so  oonneoted  with  said  oell  as  to  cause  the  passage 
of  gas  therefrom  into  said  vessel  below  the  fluid-level 

of  the  same,  and  a  pivoted  oover  for  said  vessel. 


g.  In  apparatus  of  the  character  described,  the  com¬ 
bination  with  a  battery  oell,  of  a  fluid -containing  vessel 
so  oonneoted  with  said  oell  as  to  oause  the  passage  of  gas 
therefrom  into  said  vessel  below  the  fluid  level  of  the 
same,  and  a  movable  oover  for  said  vessel  looated  and  ar¬ 
ranged  to  be  moved  into  open  position  by  excess  of  gas 
pressure  within  said  vessel. 


4.  In  apparatus  of  the  character  described,  the  com¬ 
bination  with  a  battery  cell,  of  a  fluid -containing  vessel 
so  oonneoted  with  said  oell  as  to  oause  the  passage  of  gas 
therefrom  into  said  vessel  below  the  fluid-level  of  the  same, 
a  pivoted  oover  for  said  vessel,  said  oover  being  looated  and 
arranged  to  be  moved  into  open  position  by  exoess  of  gas 
pressure  within  said  vessel,  and  a  spring  so  formed  and 
positioned  as  to  ooaot  with  said  oover  to  resiliently  hold 
the  same  in  either  dosed  or  open  position. 


5.  In  apparatus  of  the  character  described,  the  com¬ 
bination  with  a  battery  oell,  of  a  vessel  fitting  olosely 
within  (.the  filling) opening  of  the  same  and  provided  with 
an  exterior  opening  and  an  opening  extending  from  the  in¬ 
terior  thereof  into  the  space  above  the  eleotrolyte  in  the 
said  oell,  and  a  removable  oover  for  the  exterior  opening. 

6.  In  apparatus  of  the  character  described,  the  com¬ 
bination  with  a  battery  oell,  of  a  fluid -containing  vessel 
mounted  within  the  same,  having  a  passage  therefrom  extend¬ 
ing  out  through  the  top' of  the  oell,  said  vessel  having  a 
vertical  sleeve,  extending  downwardly  therein  from  an  upper 
surfaoe  to  a  plane  above  the  bottom  of  said  vessel,  said  j 
sleeve  surrounding  the  lower  end  of  said  passage,  and  said  t 
vessel  having  oiroumferential  openings  oonneoting  the  spaoej 
above  the  eleotrolyte  in  said  oell  with  the  interior  of  said 
vessel  outside  said  sleeve  and  above  the  bottom  of  the  samel 


if 


^  The  specific  structure  oovered  by  the  olaims  is  that  of 

Figure  1  and  there  are  no  olaims  to  the  filling  device  shown  in 
Figure  2.  This  device  is  not  much  different  from  that  shown  in 
the  Edison  patent  Ho.  821,623  of  May  29,  1906.  I  also  note  that 
no  olaims  have  been  presented  covering  the  idea  of  insulating  the 
safety  device  from  the  battery  can.  Apparently,  the  only  function 
of  this  insulation  is  to  facilitate  the  operation  of  the  signal 
associated  with  the  filling  device,  and  you  have  already  told  me 
that  the  filling  operation  oannot  be  performed  satisfactorily  in  the 
manner  illustrated  in  Figure  2  beoause  there  is  no  vent  for  the  es¬ 
cape  of  air.  Do  you  consider  this  insulation  feature  of  importance? 
Sossibly,  a  claim  oan  be  obtained  on  it  by  an  amendment  under  Rule  78, 
or  if  it  is  of  sufficient  importance,  the  oase  might  be  permitted  to 
forfeit  and  then  renewed.  If  you  think  the  invention  is  sufficient¬ 
ly  protected  by  the  olaims  allowed  and  reoommend  talcing  the  patent 
out,  X  should  like  to  have  Mr.  Edison's  authorization  to  pay  the 
~final~feeT  I  presume  no  foreign  applications  are  to  be  filed.  Do 
you  consider  any  of  the  details  shown  in  figures  other  than  Figure  1 
of  sufficient  importance  to  justify  the  filing  of  a  divisional  ap¬ 


plication? — 


HL-JS 


Patent  Series 


Patent  Application  Files 

Folio  #  768  Concrete  Furniture 

Serial  #:  639752 

Primary  Applicant:  Edison,  Thomas  A 

Date  Executed:  7/18/1911 


Serial  No 


7  L o  ' 


Applicant. 

r-H-  . 


Title  (psrrtssu£'- . 


,3  /,  . . /SAL . 


Examiner’s  Room  No.- 


Assignee 
Ass’g’t  Exec. 


Recorded 


Liber . . . Page 


Patent  No.  V. ^  Issued 


ACTIONS. 


petition 


®0  tijc  Commissioner  o{  patents : 

.  •  *»  ®““  —  - 

llewellyn  Park,'  West  Orange,  Essex  County,  New  Jersey 

/praps^jat  letters  patent  map  be  gtanteb  to  Ijim  for  tlje  implements  in 

fri 

1  ,  '  !  CONCRETE  FURHITURE 


At  fortij  in  tfje  annexeb  Specification;  anb  ije  berebp  appoints  ftmk  %. .9s« 
(Registration  Mo.  560),  of  ©range,  J?eto  BferSep,  i)iS  attornep,  Untf)  full 
pobier  of  substitution  anb  rebocation,  to  prosecute  tips  application,  to  make 
/^alterations  anb  amenbments  therein,  to  receibe  tlje  patent,  anb  to  transact  a 
**  business  in  tlje  patent  Office  connecteb  tijeretoitf). 

.  A-  - 


SPECIFICATION 


TO  All  WHOM  IT  MAY  CONCERN: - 


BE  IT  KNOWN,  that  I.  THOMAS  A.  EDISON,  a  oitizen 
of  the  United  States  ana  a  resident  of  I.lewellyn  Park, 

West  Orange ,  Essex  County,  New  Jersey,  have  invented  cer¬ 
tain  new  ana  useful  improvements  in  CONCRETE  FURNITURE,  of 
whioh  the  following  is  a  specification: - 


|  My  invention  relates  to  the  use  of  oonoreto  for 

!  artioles  of  furniture,  and  has  for  its  onsets  the  produot- 

I*1  ion  of  material  suitable  for  this  purpose ,  which  is  fire¬ 
proof,  cheaper  than  wood,  and  not  subject  to  many  of  the 
deteriorating  influences  which  affect  wood,  and  the  pro¬ 
vision  of  means  for  assembling  and  securing  together  the 
parts  made  of  this  material  so  as  to  form  the  completed 
article.  More  particularly,  my  invention  relates  to  an 
|  improved  phonograph  cabinet  constructed  of  reinforced  con- 

My  invention  consists  generally  in  the  use  of 
ooncrete  made  of  cement,  preferably  Portland,  mixed  with 
very  light  porous  sand  or  other  aggregates,  such  as  pumice 
atone,  charcoal,  coke,  or  furnace  slag  made  porous  by 
steam  or  other  gases  being  blown  through  the  molten  mass, 
and  reinforced  in  a  suitable  manner,  as  by  metallic  per¬ 
forated  sheets  or  wire  screen  cloth.  The  pores  of  the 
porous  aggregates  are  preferably  of  such  small  dimensions 
that  the  cement  particles  cannot  enter  them,  and  thus,  the 
greater  part  of  the  bulk  of  the  concrete,  after  it  has 

(1') 


|  »d  a.  »•»  o£  olrS. 

I  spot,. s.  Thus ,  by  employing  P«”  sggttgstt.  M',1”e  “ 
loose,  spongy,  or  o.llulsr  stru.ture,  1  h.yo  boon  obi.  to 
pro  Quo  e  o  oonorot.  uhl.h  1.  only  a  little  heayi.r  then 
rood  and  uhl.h  i.  admirably  adapted  for  the  purpose.  d.-_ 
lj  sired . 

Ij  The  articles  of  furniture,  if  large ,  are  prefer- 

ably  mode  in  separate  pieoeB,  ana  meanB  are  proviaea  for 
assembling  and  securing  the  pieces  together,  as,  for  exam- 
I  ple.  by  metallic  parts  molded  in  place  in  the  separate 
j  pieces,  so  that  upon  assembling  the  pieces,  they  may  be 
I  bolted  together. 

j  To  show  tho  manner  in  which  my  invention  may  be 

|  oarried  out,  I  have  illustrated  it  as  applied  to  the  oon- 
jl  at  motion  of  a  cabinet  for  phonographs,  but  obviously,  my 
j  invention  is  applicable  to  furniture  of  all  Kinds. 

|  In  the  drawings  whioh  aooompany  and  form  a  part 

j  of  this  specification,,  and  in  which  like  reference  charac 
j  ters  are  employed  to  designate  like  parts  in  the  several 
views  - 

j  Figure  1  is  a  vertical  sectional  view  of  a 

j  phonograph  cabinet  constituting  one  embodiment  of  my  in- 

vention;  /  Vfyty 

Figures  2  and  3  aranpSftpaotiva  views  showing 

certain  details  of  construction;.  ^ 

the  line  4-4  of  Figure 

Figure  5  iTC^S^itly'in  section  showing  a 
portion  of  one  of  the  cabinet  pieces  or  parts  at  a  stage 
in  its  construction  immediately  after  the  reinforoing 


(2) 


material  has  been  laia  r/ty/y 

S-iBure  6  is^a.  seotitoal  view  showing  one  fo: 

of  a  portion  of  a  seouring  devioe;  f/,/y  I 

figure  7  is^ section!1  view  showing  a  moaifiea  | 
form  of  a  portion  of  the  seouring  aevioe ;  and 

figure  8  isTseotlo^ua  view  through  a  hinged 
portion  of  the  oahinet. 

Referring  to  the  drawings,  at  1  is  illustrated 
one  of  the  two  side  pieees  or  parts  of  the  cabinet.  ?he  ^ 
front  piece  or  part  of  the  same  is  shown  at  2.  and  the  bach 
piece  or  part  at  8.  The  top  member  or  frame  is  shown  at 
4  resting  upon  and  supported  by  the  frame  formed  of  the 
side  pieces  1  and  the  front  and  bach  pieces  2,  and  8.  The 
lid  of  the  cabinet  is  shown  at  5  and  is  hinged  to  the  top 
piece  4  at  5' .  Horizontal  partitions  or  shelves  are 
shown  at  6.  7  and  8.  The  side  pieces  1,  front  and  bach 
pieces  2  and  3.  top  piece  4,  lid  6.  and  horizontal  partit¬ 
ions  or  shelves  6,  7  and  8  are  made  of  concrete]  which  is 
preferably  composed  of  fortland  cement  mi,ed  with  very  lighfe 

I1  porous  aggregates,  such  as  pumice  stone,  charcoal,  oohe, 
or  furnace  slag,. made  porous  by  steam  being  blown  through 
the  molten  mass,]and  reinforced  by  metallic  perforated 
sheets  or  wire  screen  oloth,  suoh  as  is  shown  at  9.  Por¬ 
tions  of  the  molds  .or  forms  for  forming  these  parts  into 
suitable  shapes  are  shown  at  10-  Bach  •*  3ide 
,  is  preferably  formed  with  a  pair  of  metallic  tubular  mem 
bera  11  located  near  the  edges  of  the  side  pieces  are 

vertical  when  in  assembled  position,  thus  providing  verti¬ 
cal  members  at  each  corner  of  the  main  frame.  Each  of 

the  tubular  members  preferably  projects  a  short  distance 


(3) 


I  above  the  main  frame  at  eaoh  oornar  thereof,  as  la  olearly 
Qhovm  ln  Figure  3.  Che  lower  ends  of  the  tubular  members 
I  11  servo  to  receive  the  rollere  12  of  the  oabinet..  Jhe^ 
j  top  pieoe  4  is  provided  at  eaoh  corner  with  a  recessed-  ^ 

aptea  to  receive  the  projecting  upper  ends  of  the  members 
11  at  eaoh  oorner  of  the  frame,  and  moans  is  thereby  pro- 
I  viaed  for  retaining  the  top  member  4  in  plaoe  on  the  main 
j|  frame.  In  order  to  Becure  the  pieces  of  the  cabinet  to- 
gother,  moans  are  provided,  os  illustrated  particularly 
in  Figures  4,  5  and  6,  consisting  of  bolts  14,  nuts  15, 

!|  washers  16  ana  17,  and  metallic  angle  irons  19.  The 
method  of  providing  the  seouring  means  is  as  follows :- 
j  a  pair  of  washers  16  and  17  are  placed  on  eaoh  side  of  one 

iof  the  interstioes  of  the  reinforoing  fabrio  9  ana  the  bolt 
14  threaded  through  the  washerB  ana  the  opening  in  the  re- 
,  inforoing  fabrio.  The  nut  16  is  then  screwed  in  place, 

I1  ^  the  reinforoing  fabrio ,  together  with  the  bolt  ana  its 
nut  ana  the  washers,  are  all  set  in  plaoe  in  the  plastio 
mass  of  concrete,  as  is  olearly  shown  in  Figures  4.  5  and 
6.  After  the  concrete  has  set,  the  bolt  14  is  unscrewed  | 
from  its  nut  and  from  the  hardened  oonorete.  At  any  time  I 
,  thereafter,  the  bolt  may  be  sorewea  into  the  nut  for  the 
j|  purpose  of  retaining  in  plaoe  one  of  the  angle  irons  19. 

In  the  modification  shown  in  Figure  7,  the  bolt  J 
j  20  is  set  in  plaoe  with  its  head  embedded  in  the  oonorete. 

In  this  figure ,  21  and  22  show  washers  for  the  bolt  on  each 
side  of  the  reinforoing  fabrio  9.  In  UBing  this  modifies- 
tion,  the  angle  iron  19  is  seourea  in  plaoe  by  means  of  a  _  q 
nut  sorewed  on  the  bolt  20.  The  side  pieoes  1  and  the  end  ' 
pieoes  2  ana  3  may  be  oast  in  Buoh  a  form  as  t<?.  join  tbgeth- 


j  er  in  a  suitable  manner,  ae  is  shown  at  23.  for  the  purpoee 
j  of  increasing  the  rigidity  of  the  structure.  The  side 
II  pieces  1  are  preferably  molded  with  projections  or  ledges 
24  25  and  26  which  serve  the  purpose  of  supporting  the 

horizontal  partitions  or  shelves  6.  7  and  8  respectively. 

||  p0r  the  purpose  of  securing  hinges  to  those  parts  which 
|  are  to  be  hinged  together,  wooden  blocks  27  are  molded  in 
j  the  pieces  or  parts,  end  the  hinge  28  is  secured  to  the 
I  wooden  blocks  27  by  means  of  screws  29,  ns  is  clearly 
shown  in  figure  8.  A  door  30  is  provided  in  the  upper 
\  portion  of  the  phonograph  oabinet  to  furnish  easy  access 
|  to  the  phonographic  apparatus  which  is  contained  in  the 
I  cabinet.  The  top  partition  or  shelf  6  is  provided  with 
1  an  opening  31  through  which  the  neck  of  the  phonograph  horn 
passes.  The  front  piece  2  is  provided  with  an  opening  32 

I1  in  its  upper  part  intended  to  afford  an  outlet  for  the 
sound  produced  by  the  phonograph,  and  with  an  opening  33 
in  its  lower  end  which  may  be  provided  with  a  door.  The 
lower  part  of  the  cabinet  may  be  used  for  any  suitable 
purpose,  suuh  as  storing  records. 

The  features  of  construction  described  in  con¬ 
nection  with  the  phonograph  cabinet  may  obviously  be  appliel 

I  to  other  forms  of  household  furniture  and  articles  of  like 
character.  The  articles  after  hardening  and  drying  may  be 
varnished  over  or  painted  in  a  suitable  manner,  either  plaii 
or  in  imitation  of  wood.  If  desired,  the  articles  may  be 
japanned  by  the  methods  employed  in  japanning  iron  articles, 
inasmuch  as  the  concrete  is  not  affected  by  the  heat  at  the 
temperature  employed  in  japanning  ovens. 


(5) 


Having  now  described  ray  invention,  what  X  olaim 
and  desire  to  protect  by  Letters  Patent  is  as  follows :- 

rf,4, 

A  composition  of  matter,  consisting  of  oonorete 
ooraposed  of  oomont  and  porous  aggregates,  substantially  as 
described. 

A  composition  of  matter,  consisting  of  oonorete 
oomposed  df  Portland  oement  and  porous  aggregates,  sub- 
stantially\as  described. 

composition  of  matter,  consisting  of  oonoretej 
ooraposed  of  \omont  und  pumioe  stone,  substantially  as  de¬ 
scribed  . 

\ 

imposition  of  matter,  consisting  of  oonorete 
oomposed  of  Portland  oement  and  pumioe  stone,  substantial¬ 
ly  as  described 

5.  A  composition  of  matter  consisting  of  oonorete 
composed  of  oemont\and  porous  aggregates,  the  pores  of  the 
aggregates  being  siibst antially  free  from  oement,  sub¬ 
stantially  as  described. 

6.  A  composition  of  matter  consisting  of  oonorete 
composed  of  Portland  dement  and  porous  aggregates , the  poresj 
of  the  aggregates  bein\  substantially  free  from  oement, 
substantially  as  described. 

7.  An  artlole\of  furniture  oomposed  of  reinforoed 
oonorete  consisting  ofW.ent  and  porous  aggregates,  sub¬ 
stantially  as  described^ 

An  article  of  furniture  oomposed  of  a  plurality 
of  pieoes  of  reinforoed\oonbrete  oonsisting  of  oement  i 
porous  aggregates,  substantially  aB  described. 


(6) 


r4u'i>'k$-4 

\  9.  An  article  of  furniture  composed  of  a  plurality 

of  plebes  of  reinforced  oonoreto,.  the  said  pieces  being 

providedViith  means  for  seouring  tho  same  together,  sub¬ 
stantially  as  desorlbed. 

10.  In  an  artiole  of  furniture,  separate  pieces  of 
reinforoed  oonore\.  and  moans  for  seouring  the  same  to¬ 
gether,  substantializes  described. 

11.  In  a  phonogmidi  cabinet,  side  pieoos,  front'-, 
and  boot  pieces ,  and  a  top\ieoe,  some  of  said  pieces  . 

being  of  reinforoed, oonorete, substantially  as  described. 

12.  In  a  phonograph  cabinet^,  side  pieces,  front 
and  back  pieces,  and  a  top  piece.  all\of  said  pieces  being 
of  reinforoed  concrete,  substantially  ^described. 

13.  In  a  phonograph  cabinet,  a  main\frame  of  re 
inforoed  concrete  and  provided  with  members  p^Jeoting 
upwards  at  its  upper  corners,  an  upper  frame  hav\w  a 
lid  and  provided  with  moans  for  engaging  the  said  in¬ 
jecting  members,  substantially  as  described. 

(y  */*-/? 

ik.  In  a  phonog\sph  cabinet,  vertical  side  pieces 

vertioal  front  and  baok  pleoes,  a  toP  Pieoe*  ^  horizont 
al  members,  (some  of  the  said  vertioal  members  being  pro¬ 
vided  with^je'otim^for  snorting  tho  horizontal 
members  J  ail  of,, said  pieces  an\members  being  of  rein¬ 
forced  oonorete ,  substantially  ad' described. 


&  - 


r  c. 


Uy 
~  '<  ■■*?*//*. 


190/ 


TOjib  specification  signet)  anb  toitneSSeb  tijis  /?^bap  of 

_ A-  . 


©atb. 


State  of  iJeto  3ferSep 
Count?  of  Cssex 


THOMAS  a.  EDisoii  ,  tbe  abobe  nameb 
petitioner,  being  bul?  Stuocn,  beposes  anb  Saps  tfjat  fje  is  a  citizen  of  tfje  Uniteb 
States,  anb  a  reSibent  Of  Llewelljm  partet  v/e at  Orange,  Essex  County, 

Hew  Jersey 

tfjat  fje  berilp  beliebes  fjitnSelf  to  be  tfje  original,  first  anb  sole  inbentor  of  tfje 
improbements  in 


CONCRETE  FURNITURE 


bescribeb  anb  claimeb  in  tfje  annexeb  Specification;  that  fje  boes  not  bnob)  anb 
boes  not  beliebe  tfjat  tfje  Same  toas  eber  btiobm  or  uSeb  before  fjis  inbention  or 
biScoberp  tfjereof;  or  patenteb  or  bescribeb  in  anp  printeb  publication  in  tfje 
IHniteb  States  of  America  or  anp  foreign  countrp  before  bib  inbention  or 
biScoberp  tfjereof,  or  more  tijan  ttoo  pears  prior  to  this  application;  or  patenteb 
in  anp  countrp  foreign  to  tfje  Uniteb  States  on  an  application  fileb  more  tfjan 
ttoclbe  montijs  prior  to  tfjis  application ;  or  in  public  use  or  on  sale  in  tfje 
IHniteb  States  for  more  tfjan  ttoo  pears  prior  to  tfjis  application;  anb  tfjat  no 
application  for  patent  upon  Saib  inbention  fjas  been  fileb  bp  fjitn  or  fjis  legal 
representatibes  or  assigns  in  anp  foreign  countrp. 


si- 


Stoorn  to  anb  SubScribeb  before  me  tfjis  //  ^  bap  of  190^ 


I  Seal  | 


Jilotatp  -public. 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 
UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 

WASHINGTON  r~A$E7~24;,  ,  1:911. 

ThomaB  A.  Edison,  ,  jail 

C/o  Frank  1.  Dyer, 

Orange,  H.  J. 


Please  find  below  a  oom.mwnioa.Uoa  from  the  EXAMINER  in  eharge  of  your  application. 

Serial  Ho. 639,752,  filed  July  21,  1911,  for  Concrete  Eurnlture. 


Claims  1  to  6  inclusvie  are  for  a  composition  of 
latter.  Claims  7  to  14  are  for  an  article  of  furniture,  and  a 
phonograph  record  cabinet,  specifically.  Applicant  is  required 
to  divide,  limiting  his  application  to  one  of. these  groups  of  claim*,: 
each  being  for  separate  and  distinot  subject  raatterB, 

As  showing  the  state  of  the  art  after  a  oursbry  ex¬ 


amination  see 


Price,  948,770,  Feb. 
English  Eat.  2,027, 
Hills,  903,977,  Hov. 
Kelts ,  916,326,  Mar 


,  8,  1910,  Tables; 
of  1874,  Chains; 

,  17,  1908,  D.H. Enclosed; 
23,  1909,  "  "  " 


IN  THE  UNITED  STATES  PATENT  ORRIOE 


Thomas  A.  Edison 
CONCRETE  EURNITURE 
Riled  July  21,  1911 
Serial  No.  639,752 

HONORABLE  COMMISSIONER  OR  PATENTS, 

SIR: 

In  response  to  the  Offioe  aotion  of 
August  25,  1911,  please  amend  the  above  entitled  appli¬ 
cation  as  follows :- 


i  6  inolusive,  and  substitute 


1(0 

1.  An  artiole  of  furnitiire  having  parts  consisting 
of  oonorete  composed  of\oeraent  and  porous  aggregates, 
substantially  as  described. 


2.  An  artiole  of  furniture  having  parts  consisting 
of  oonorete  oomposed  of  Portland  cement  and  porous  aggre¬ 
gates,  substantially  as  described. 


An  artiole  of  furniti 


a  having  parts  consisting 


of  concrete  composed  of /oemenw  and  aggregates  of  pumioe 
stone,  substantially  e.s  desorioed. 


4.  An  artiole  of  furniture  having  parts  consisting 
of  concrete  oomposed  of  Portland  boment  and  aggregates  of 


(1) 


5.  An  artioleVf  furnittire  havlnc  pwrta  oonBlatines  j 

of  oonorete  composed  de  o ament  and  porous  aggregates,  the 
pores  of  the  aggregate^ing  substantially  free  from 
oemont ,  substantially  asYdesoribod. 

6,  An  artiole  of  furniture  having  parts  consisting 
of  oonorete  oomposed  of  Portland  oement  and  porous  aggro- 
gates,  the  pores'  of  the  aggregates  being  substantially  free 
from  oement,  substantially  akdesoribed. 

Add  the  following  olaims: - 


tf-w* 

\  15.  m  an  artiole  of  furniture,  a  pieoe  or  member 
of  reinforced  oonorete  having  fastening  means  extending 
through 'the  reinforcing,  whereby  the  reinforcing  assists 
in  retaining  the  fastening  means  in  place,  substantially 
as  described. \ 

16.  In  onsrtiolo.  of  furniture,  the  combination  of 
a  piece  or  memberlXconorete ,  an  internal  screw  threaded 
member  embedded  therek.  a  perforated  member,  and  a  screw 
or  bolt  extending  througVthe  perforated  member  and  threadecj 
into  the  internal  screw  threaded  member  to  secure  the  per¬ 
forated  member  to  the  piece  or '-member  of  oonorete,  sub¬ 
stantially  as  desdribed.  \ 

17.  In  an  artiole  of  furniture'*  the  combination  of 
pieoes  or  members  of  concrete,  each  havW  an  internal 
Bcrew  threaded  member  embedded  therein,  aerated  member 
for  connecting  the  pieces  or  members  of  concrete  together 
and  screws  or  bolts  extended  through  the  performed  member 
and  threaded  into  the  internal  screw  threaded  memb^ 
securing  the  connecting  member  to  the  pieces  or  membe\) 
oonorete,  substantially  as  deBOribed. 


(2) 


""'18.,.  A  oabinet  having  vartioal  members  or  pieoes  of 
oonorete,  vertibally  disposed  tubular  members  molded  there¬ 
in,  and  rollers  for  the"babinet  mounted  in  the  lower  ends 
of  the  tubular  members,  sub s  t  antiftl-ly^s s  desoribed. 

to  W'y  ^ 

19..  A  cabinet  'having  vertical , members  or  pieoes  of 
oonorete,  vertically  ^disposed  tubular  memtars  molded  there¬ 
in?  and  a  top^pieoe  or.  member  having  reoesses  adapted  to 
rooeive  the  upper ' ends  of  the  tubular  members,  whereby  tho 
top  pieoe  or  member/is  positioned,  substantially  as  de¬ 
scribed. 

20.  A  oabinet  having  vartioal  members  or  pieoes  of 
oonorete,  ve^tioally  disposed  tubular  members  molded  there¬ 
in,  a  top  pieoe  or^aemljor  having  reoesses  adapted  to  ro¬ 
oeive  the  upper  ends  of  thT^ttcbuiar  members ,  whereby  the 
top  pieoe  or  member  is  positioned,  and"rei;Lers  for  the 
oabinet  mounted  in  the  lower  ends  of  the  tubular'memb.ars^ 
substantially  as  described. 


1  E  11  A  E  K  S 


The  requirement  for  division  has  been  oomplied 
with  by  tho  oanoellation  of  olaims  1  to  6  inolusive. 
Applioant  reserves  tho  right  to  file  a  divisional  appli¬ 
cation  on  the  subjeot  matter  of  these  olaims. 

The  new  olaims  submitted  are  believed  to  be 
properly  examinable  with  original  olaims  7  to  14  inclusive. 

Aotion  on  the  merits  is  requested. 


Hespeotfully  submitted, 
THOMAS  A.  EDI S OH 


By  ^  dtUyj 


Orange,  Hew  Jersey, 
July  24th,  1912. 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 
UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 
WASHINGTON 

Thomaa  A.  Edison,  AuGust  5,  10X2. 

o/o  Frank  L.  Dyer,  'CL. 

Orange,  N.  J.  .yj^  $  |l)i; 

Please  find  below  a,  communication  from  the  EX  AW  HER  in  charge  of  your  application. 

#639, 752  filed  July  21,  1911  for  Concrete  Furniture. 


Amendment  of  July  25,  1912  is  of  record. 

Claims  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  6,  7  and  8  are  rejected  ae  aggre¬ 
gations  as  the  particular  oharaoter  of  the  cement  used  in  no 
way  cooperates  with. the  structure  of  the  furnituro.  The  compo¬ 
sition  of  the  cement  is  in  itself  subjeot  matter  of  invention. 

•  C  -  c/ 

See  Bande  299,810,  June  3,  1884  and  Parohull  323,722,  Aug.  4, 
1886,  class  106-24-fr. 

Claims  1  to  8,  inclusive,  are  rejected  ao  mot  in  terras 
hy  Prieo  of  record  in  view  of  Purshall  and  Lande  citod. 

ClaimB  9  and  10  read  directly  upon  Price  of  reoord  and 
are  rejected. 

Claims  11  and  12  are  rejeoted  on  Kelts  or  Hills  of  record 
in  view  of  Prioe.  To  construct  the  oabinet  of  Keltz  or  Hills  of 
cement  would  be  suggested  by  Price.  / 


Claims  13,  14  and  19  are  rejeoted  on  Faust  836,608,  Nov. 
13,  1906  or  Myers  262,053,  Jan.  10,  1882.  Book  oases,  Knook 
Down  in  view  of  Prioe.  All  applicant  has  done  is  substitute 
cement  for  wood  in  Myers  or  Faust  which  would  be  suggested  by 
Prioe.  To  imbed  member  D\,of  Myers  or  F  of  Faust  in  oement  is 


not  invention, 


Claims  18  and  20  do  not  distinguish  over  the  above  references 


and  reaoons  and  moreover  are  aggregations  as  the  oastero  do  not 
cooperate  with  the  other  structure  set  forth. 

Claims  15.  16  and  17  are  rejected  on  Reinle  701,816,  June 

o  v 

3,  1902,  or  Paulle,  760,805,  May  24,  1904,  show  oases,  in  view 

/os' 

of  White  875,396,  Deo.  31,  1907  or  Craig  977,710,  Deo.  6,  1910, 
Class  72-105.  ^ 

See  also  Donaldson  641,942,  Jan.  23,  1900  and  Smith  507,562, 
Oot.  31,  1893,  Claus  72-20. 

To  substitute  ooment  for  the  material,  glass,  used  in  Paulle 
or  Reinle  using  the  bonding  moans  of  White  or  Craig  would  not  in¬ 
volve  invention. 

All  the  olaims  are  rejected. 


IN  THE  UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE. 


THOMAS  A.  EDISON,  ) 
CONCRETE  FURNITURE,  ) 
Filed  July  21,  1911,) 
Serial  No.  639,752.  ) 


HONORABLE  COMMISSIONER  OF  PATENTS, 


August  5,  1912, 


jase  amend  the  abo1 


Cancel  claims  9  to  13  inclusive. 
Claim  14,  line  4,  after  "with"  i: 


number  this  claim  i 


3  10  to  18  inclusive, 


m3  extending  thereabove  - 


Add  the  following  claim: 


/  In  an  artiole  of  furniture,  the  combinatior 

of  a  piece  or  member  of  reinforced  concrete,  a  pair  of 
washers  imbedded  in  said  piece  or  member,  one  washer  on 
either  side  of  the  reinforcing,  an  internal  screw 
threaded  member  embedded  in  said  pieoo  or  member  adjacent 
one  of  said  washers,  and  a  screw  or  bolt  threaded  through 
the  washers  and  the  reinforcing  and  into  said  internal 
screw  threaded  member,  said  screw  or  bolt  being  partially 
embedded  in  said  piece  or  member  and  extending  outwardly 
therefrom,  substantially  as  described. 


REMARKS 


It  is  submitted  that  claims  1  to  8  are  not 
aggregations  as  they  merely  describe  an  article  composed 
of  a  certain  material  or  an  article  having,  parts  or  pieoos 
composed  of  such  material.  There  is  certainly  no 
aggregation  of  elements  in  any  of  these  claims.  The  issue 
with  respect  to  these  olaims  should  apparently  be  whether  j 
invention  is  involved  in  making  an  article  of  furnituro,  j 
or  parts  thereof,  of  the  special  kind  of  concrete  specified.!. 
Applicant  strongly  contends  that  the  use  of  such  a  concrete 
for  this  purpose  does  involve  invention.  *n  the  first 
place  no  reference  has  been  cited  whioh  discloses  an 
article  of  furniture  constructed  of  concrete  consisting 
of  cement  and  porous  aggregates.  Moreover,  no  reference 
has  been  cited  which  even  discloses  a  concrete  consisting 
of  cement  and  porous  aggregates.  In  the  concrete  dis¬ 
closed  by  both  Parshall  and  Lande<  of  record,  the  pumice 
stone  and  slag  are  pulverized  or  reduoed  to  a  fine  powder  arid 


do  not  exist  in  the  concrete  as  porous  aggregates.  A 
concrete  such  as  disclosed  in  those  patents  would,  therefor*', 
be  very  heavy  and  compact  and  its  uso  in  the  manufacture 
of  articles  of  household  furnituro  would  be  impracticable 
as  such  articles  would  be  entirely  too  heavy  and 
cumbersome.  The  combining  of  the  substances  as  described 
by  Parshall  results  in  a  materiul  of  stiff  consistency 
whioh  is  not  oapable  of  being  poured  .  ,  as  is  the  case  with 
the  ooncrote  mixture  disolosed  by  applicant,  but  is  applied 

with  a  trowel  or  the  like.  She  fine  pulverizing  of  the 

,  ...  _ osition  and  the  slag  of 

pumice  stone  of  Parshall' s  comps 

lande's  composition  serves  to  destroy  the  porous  structure 
thereof  and  renders  it  impossible  to  obtain  a  concrete 
of  the  requisite  lightness.  The  oonorete  of  lands  is 


adapted  for  use  only  in  mulcing  heavy  articles  such  us  the 
part  honoh  disolosed  hy  Price  ,and  not  for  articles  such 
as  household  furniture  which  are  frequently  moved  from 
place  to  place.  As  Bet  forth  in  the  last  four  lines 
of  page  1  and  the  first  six  lines  of  page  2,  the  greater 
part  of  the  hulk  of  applicant's  concrete  .after  it  has  been 
hardoned  and  the  water  has  been  driven  out  .consists  of  air 
spaces  and  such  concrete  is  only  a  little  hoavicr  than  wood 
As  the  Examiner  is  doubtless  aware. there  are  numerous 
decisions  to  the  offset  that  where  the  substitution  of  one 
material  for  another  results  in  a  superior  product  and 
simplifies  and  cheapens  the  manufacture  of  such  product, 
such  substitution  amounts  to  invention.  The  following 
extracts  from  decisions  on  this  point  are  cited  by  way  of  j 
example: 


I  «  "The  substitution  of  one  material  for  another  may 
amount  to  invention  where  a  superior  product  results 
from  the  substitution." 

Eureka  Blotter  Bath  Company  vs.  Hicholas  et  al. 
157  P.  556. 

"The  use  of  a  different  material  in  constructing 
an  article  previously  patented  involves  invention  wnere 
it  produces  a  useful  result,  increased  efficiency,  or  a 
deoided  saving  in  operation."  .  ^  .  _ 

George  Frost  Co.  et  al.  vs.  Samstag  et  al. 

180  F.  739. 

"The  substitution  of  one  material  for  another 
involves  invention  where  the  substituted  material  is  used 
in  a  rolation  in  which  it  had  not  before  Been  used  and  .  _ 

in  which  it  accomplished  new  and  very  beneficial  results. 

119  F.  505. 


The  use  of  applicant's  concrete  as  described  results 
in  an  article  of  furniture  which,  while  only  a  little 
heavier  than  wood,  is  much  stronger  and  more  durable  than 
wooid.  Moreover,  the  manufacture  of  such  artioleB  is  rend 
much  simpler  and  cheaper  than  where  wood  is  used. 


:!red 


3 


Claim  9,  (former  claim  14)  as  now  presented,  is  believed 
to  clearly  differentiate  from  Faust,  Myers  and  ^riee  0f 
record.  (Hone  of  these  patents  discloses  vertloal  members  / 
of  reinforced  oonorete  provided  with  integral  promotions 
for  supporting  the  horizontal  members.  Moreover,  none 
of  these  references  discloses  a  phonograph  cabinet. 

.  Claim  10  (former  claim  19)  clearly  distinguishes  from 
the  references  of  record  by  specifying  that  the  vertically 
disposed  tubular  members  are  molded  in  the  vortical  mcmberB 


of  concrete  and  extend  thereabove,  and  that  the  top  piece  j 
is  provided  with  recesses  adapted  to  receive  the  upper  ends \ 
of  the  tubular  members  whereby  tho  top  piece  is  positioned. | 
By  the  construction  describod  in  this  claim,  the  cabinet  may 
be  much  more  easily  assembled  than  tho  structure  disclosed 
in  either  Faust  or  Myers. 

Hew  claim  11  presented  herewith  is  drawn  specifically 
to  the  construction  and  arrangement  of  the  securing  moans 
provided  in  oach  of  several  members  of  the  cabinet  described 
in  tho  specification .whereby  thoBe  members  may  be  readily 
secured  together,  fhis  claim  is  believed  to  be  clearly 
patentable  over  the  references  of  record. 

For  the  above  reasons,  further  consideration  and 
allowance  of  the  claims  as  now  presented  are  requested. 

Hespeotfully  submitted. 


inoHAS  a.  ed id  cm 

By  X-  „ 

'ttorney/ 


Orange,  Hew  Jersey, 
August  2-j  1913. 


V/AH-KGK 


-20 


CMR/AHS 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 
UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFRIOE  t 


-Thomaa- A...BdlBon, -j»6a9 ,752^..  .-C.Qnax.etfl.J'.iArnitu] 


lendment  of  Aug.  4,  1913. 


Reinstein  (British)  25,108  of 


It’  is  'believod  that  ' the  \i 
kind  instead  of  the  ordinary  o 


tion  of  materials  and  nothing  n 


i  of  a'ctribrete  of,ua '  part  loular 


an  article  of  furniture  light,  it  would  not  be  invention- 
to  choose  any  of  the  old  and  well  known  aggregations,  such  as 
ground  slag*  pumioe  stone,  instead  of  stone.  Whether  suoh 
aggregat  fesn  be  whole.pr  ground  is  not  regarded  as  a  matter  of 

patentability  at  all,  but  of  ohoioe.  The  ground  pumioe  stone 
would  _ 

or  slag  certainly  v'/i.  not  lose  materially  its  property  of  I 

lightness,  that  Is,  the  speoifio  gravity  thereof  Wcibld^iiot  U 
be  materially  affected  by  grinding,  because  it  is  considered  \ 
the  pumioe  stone  in  its  divided  state  v/ould  still  be  porous, 
that  is;  every  partiole  thereof  no  matter  how  small  would  stilly 
be  honeyoombed.  It  is  believed  the  only  way  whereby  the  spe¬ 
oifio  gravity  of  suoh' substance  could  be  materially  increased 
would  be  by  great  compression.  Thisis  true  of  ground  ooke 
in  the  manufacture  of  electric  light  oarbons.  It  is  not  seen 


639,752 - 2 


why  the  name  could  not  hold  in  a  similar  substance,  as  pumioe 
stone. 

Furthermore,  it  is  not  believed  necessary  necessary  to 
show  an  article  of  furniture  made  of  porous  aggregate  and 
oement,  for  the  reasons  that  aggregates  of  suoh  oomposltion 
are  old  in  the  references  of  reoord,  and  for  the  reason  that 
furniture  has  been  made  of  paper  or  papier  maohe,  oonorete, 
or  stone-like  compositions ,  as  may  be  seen  in  the  English  patent 
to  Peinstein,  or  Price,  of  reoord. 

Claim  1  is  therefore  rejected  on  Prioe,  of  reoord, 
or  upon  the  new  reference  to  Heinstein,  in  view  of  Parshall 
or  Laude,  of  reoord. 

Claims  2,  3,  4,  5,  6,  7,  andS  are  rejeoted  upon  the  same 
referenoes.  It  is  believed  that  applicant  has  nothing  patent- 
able  in  the  use  of  this  particular  kind  of  oomposition  in  an 
artiole  of  furniture  over  ordinary  oonorete,  and  that  the  in¬ 
vention  lies  in  the  oomposition  per  se  or  in  the  specific 
struoture  of  the  artiole  itself_ 

Claim  9,  as  amended,  fails  to  define  anything  patentable 
over  the  olaim  as  originally  presented  and  it  is  therefore  re¬ 
jected  on  the  referenoes  of  reoord  for  the  reasons  of  reoord. 

Claim  10  is  rejeoted  upon  the  same  references. 

Claim  11  is  not  believed  complete.  The  member  whioh 
ooaots  with  the  sorew  or  bolt  to  provide  an  attachment  or  oon-  7 
neotion  with  other  adjaoent  pieces  should  be  set  forth. 

The  olaim  may  then  be  allowed. 


Examiner  Div.  33 


IJJ  THE  UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 

Thomas  A.  Edison 
CONCRETE  FURNITURE 

Room  No .  131 

Filed  July  21,  1911 
Serial  No.  639,762 

HONORABLE  COMMISSIONER  OF  PATENTS, 

SIRS 

In  response  to  the  Offioe  aotion  of 
September  13,  1913,  please  amend  the  above  entitled  oase 
as  follows 

Page  2,  line  24,  after  "are"  insert  -  enlarged 
Line  26,  oanoel  "a  seotion"  and  insert  -"an  enlarged  seotioi - 
al  view  -  .  line  28,  oanoel  "a",  first  ooourrenoe,  and 
insert  -''an  enlarged  -  . 

Page  3,  lines  2,  4  and  6,  oanoel  "a",  first  ooour- 

J 

renoe,  and  insert  -  an.  enlarged • -  .  ^ 

Page  4,  line  4,  after  "reoess"  insert  -  13  -  . 

Oanoel  olaims  1  to  10  inolusive  and  renumber 
olaim  11  as  olaim  1. 

Add  the  following  olaims:  - 

I2»  The  oomblnation  of  a  piece  of  reinforced  )V 
oonorete,  a  perforated  member  embedded  in  said  pieoe  ad- 
jaoent  the  reinforoing,  an  Internal  sorew  threaded  member 
imbedded  in  said  pieoe  adjaoent  the  reinforoing,  and  a 
Borew  or  bolt  extending  through  said  perforated  member  and 
the  reinforoing  and  threaded  into  said  internal  sorew 
threaded  member,  said  sorew  or  bolt  extending  outwardly 
from  said  pieoe,  substantially  as  desoribed. 


(1) 


II 


13.  Che  combination  of  a  plane  of  reinforced  .  1. 
oonorete,  a  perforated  member  embedded  in  said  pieoe  ad- 
jaoent  the  reinforoing,  and  a  sorew  or  bolt  extending 
through  said  perforated  member  and  the  reinforoing  and 
having  one  end  portion  disposed  within  saia  pieoe  and  the 
other  end  portion  extending  outwardly  from  Baia  pieoe,  the 
end  of  the  sorew  or  bolt  within  said  pieoe  being  provided 
with  means  ooaoting  with  said  perforated  member  ana  tbe 
reinforoing  to  prevent  outward  movement  of  the  sorew  or 
bolt  with  respeot  to  saia  pieoe,  substantially  as  described. 

4.  The  oombinatlon  of  a  pieoe  of  reinforced  ; 
oonorete,  a  pair  of  washers  embedded  in  said  pieoe,  one  on 
either  side  of  the  reinforoing,  and  a  sorew  or  bolt  extend¬ 
ing  through  said  washers  and  the  reinforoing  and  having  one 
portion  disposed  within  saia  pieoe  and  the  other  end  por¬ 
tion  extending  outwardly  from  said  pieoe,  the  end  of  the 
sorew  or  bolt  within  saia  pieoe  being  provided  with  means 
ooaoting  with  saia  washers  ana  the  reinforoing  to  prevent 
outward  movement  of  the  sorew  or  bolt  with  respeot  to  saia 
pieoe,  substantially  as  desoribed. 

REMARKS 

It  is  thought  that  the  objeotion  to  olaim  1, 
former  olaim  11,  made  in  the  last  Offloe  action  is  unwar¬ 
ranted.  It  does  not  seem  necessary  to  inoluae  in  this 
olaim  the  member  (shown  in  the  drawing  as  angle  iron  19) 
whloh  ooaots  with  the  sorew  or  bolt  to  provide  an  attach¬ 
ment  or  oonneotion  with  an  adjaoent  pieoe  ,  as  this  menber. 


before  the  assembling  of  the  pieoeB,  is  not  neoessarily 
seourei  to  either  of  them,  as  will  be  evident  from  a  perus¬ 
al  of  lines  20  to  29,  page  4  of  the  speoifioation.  The 
Examiner  is  aoooraingly  requested  to  waive  the  objection 
to  this  claim. 

Hew  claims  2  to  4,  which  are  drawn  along  the 
lines  of  present  olaim  1,  are  believed  to  be  dearly  allow 
able  ana  are  thought  neoessary  to  adequately  proteot  appli 
cant  in  his  Invention. 

An  allowance  of  this  application  is  requested. 
Eespeotfully  submitted, 

THOMAS  A.  EDI SOH 
By 

His  Attorney 

Orange,  Hew  Jersey 
September  2,  1914 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 
UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 
WASH  I NGTON 


Prank  L.  Dyer, . 

. QrnnBft,..K.J...... 


Please  find  below  a  communication  from  the  EXAMINER  in  charge  of  the  application  of 

. . 8er.;..Ho...fl39l7.52i . t lied  July  21 ,1911 ; 

. O.QncirB.1;.Q...Pu.rpiture. . . 


- - - 

Commissioner  of  Patents.  U 


Penponelve  to  amendment  of  Sept.  3,  1914. 

In  addition  to  the  reforenoeB  of  record,  preeent  claim  1, 
former  11,  3«  rejected  on 

Kelly,  358,203,  Feh.  22,  1887,  72-120. 

Kew  clalme  2,  3  and  4  are  rejeoted  on  the  "tune  referenoe. 


Examiner,  Div •  33 


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Patent  Series 
Patent  Application  Files 

Folio  #  767  Phonographs 

Serial#:  639716 

Primary  Applicant:  Moore,  Sherwood  T 
Date  Executed:  7/1 9/1911 


Folio  No..! 


Serial 


Applicant.  Address. 

/iJ,\Vvmrrr{ , .  Si...,.  . 

tUyJs . Asfr... . yhisi--/ 


Title  Q.. 


Fiied^U^/  P-'-Ll'l: . 

Assignee  J-  ,  >2ue  ■ 


Examiner’s  Room  No.. 


Ass’g’t  Exec. 

Patent  No. 


fU'-  Recorded/^^...?..'-'f^.  Liber  dLlJ. . Page 


,  -£*■#&>  Jt/Lt-  %/.%/{' . ns 

2  QUmtrs  .  17 

:i  IOl^uc&~cL,  AijL/' .  J’  7  is 


J . 


FRANK  L.  DYER, 

Counsel, 

;e,  New  Jersey. 


petition 


Co  tije  Commissioner  of  patents: 

£?our  petitioner  shehwood  t.  moorts, 
a  citizen  of  the  ®niteb  states,  reSibing  anb  ijabing  a  #oSt  Office  abbreSS  at 

|l49  High  street,  West  Orange,  in  the  county  of  isse*  and  State 
•  of  New  jersey, 


praps  mat  letters  patent  map  be  granteb  to  fjim  for  tJje  improbements  in 


PHONOGRAPHS 


set  fortij  in  tlje  annexeb  Specification;  anb  fee  feerebp  appoints  JfranU  %.  ©per 
(Registration  £o.  560),  of  Orange,  iJelu  3TerSep,  IjiS  attornep,  tantfe  full 
potajer  of  substitution  anb  rebocation,  to  prosecute  tijis  application,  to  malic 
alterations  anb  amenbments  therein,  to  receibe  tije  patent,  anb  to  transact  aU 
business  in  tije  patent  Office  connected  tijeretuitf). 


-SPECIFICATION 


TO  ALL  WHOM  IT  MAY  CONCERN: 


B  IT  KNOWN ,  that  I,  SHERWOOD  T.  MOORE,  a 


|  citizen  of  the  United  States  and  a  resident  of  West  Orange, 

\  in  the  County  of  Essex  and  State  of  New  Jersey,  have  made 
1  oertain  new  and  useful  invention  in  PHONOGRAPHS,  of  which 


|  , 

|  the  following  is  a  description: 

my  invention  relates  to  phonographB  and  more  | 

particularly  to  an  improved  stylus  mounting  therefor.  j 

In  order  to  obtain  a  large  volume,  it  iB  deBir-  j 
?  able  to  employ  a  heavy  reproducer  or  floating  weight  and  j 
j  a  record  material  of  considerable  hardneBS.  Such  a  j 

;j  record  material  wears  away  the  usual  sapphire  stylus  to  j 

|  a  considerable  extent  so  that  it  is  extremely  desirable  to  j 
I  employ  a  stylus  made  of  an  extremely  hard  material  such 
j|  as  diamond;  but,  while  diamond  has  been  suggested  for 
|  this  use  there  have  been  difficulties  attending  the  mounting 
\  of  the  same  in  an  economical  and  efficient  manner.  The 
|  principal  object  of  my  invention  is  to  provide  an  improved 
j!  mounting  whereby  the  ordinary  diamond  splints  which  may 
S bo  obtained  in  the  market  may  be  cheaply  and  firmly  secured 
|  m  place  in  their  supports.  Other  objects  of  my  invention 
Liu  appear  more  fully  in  the  following  specification  and 
appended  claims : 

In  order  that  my  invention  way  be  more  fully 
|j understood,  attention  is  hereby  directed  to  the  accompanying 
ij  drawing  forming  a  part  of  this  specification  and  in  which 


Pig.  1  represents  the  side  elevation  of  a  reprodue 
|  provided  with  a  stylus  lever  having  a  stylus  mounted  therein 
!j  according  to  iry  invention; 

I  Pig.  2  represents  a  Bide  elevation  of  a  block  of 

|  material  from  which  the  stylus  lever  is  to  be  for-ied,  a 
|  stylus  being  mounted  in  place  therein  and  the  outline  of 
I  the  lever  being  indicated  in  dotted  lines; 

Pig.  3  represents  a  bottom  plan  view  of  the  sane, 
j|  the  outline  of  the  stylus  lever  being  likewise  shown  in 

I"  dotted  lines; 

Pig.  4  represents  a  vertical  cross-sectional 
I  view  of  the  stylus  mounting  taken  by  a  plane  extending 
!  through  the  centre  of  tho  opening  in  which  the  stylus  is 
secured;  and 

Pig.  5  represents  a  central  vertical  sectional 
view  taken  at  right  angles  to  that  shown  in  Figure  4. 

In  all  of  the  views,  like  parts  are  designated 
hy  the  same  reference  numerals. 

Referring  to  the  dravrings,  my  improved  stylus  is 
formed  from  a  diamond  splint  indicated  at  3..  Splints 
||  such  as  that  illustrated  in  suitable  size  may  be  obtained 
f in  the  market  and  are  of  various  shapes  being  more  or  less 
I  irregular  and  rough  in  appearance.  In  the  formation  of 
jj  the  stylus  from  such  a  splint,  I  prepare  only  one  end 
of  the  splint  since  the  roughness  and  irregularity  of  the 
|  body  thereof  are  of  advantage  in  seouring  the  splint  in 
place.  Having  obtained  the  Bplint,  I  form  the  same  with 
|a  tapered  end  2  having  a  rounded  point  _3  adapted  to  travel 

I  in  the  groove  of  a  sound  record.  The  tapered  end  of  the 
stylus  may  he  formed  in  any  suitable  way,  as  for  example, 

2 


jj  by  the  method  set  forth  in  the  application  of  Thomas  A. 

;  -Edison,  Serial  Ho.  551,128,  filed  on  7*arch  23,  1910. 

After  the  splint  1  has  been  formed  as  described 
above,  an  opening  £  is  formed  in  a  block  £  of  the  material 
from  v/hich  the  stylus  lever  is  to  be  formed,  this  opening 
being  preferably  of  such  a  size  that  the  stylus  when 
Inserted  therein  engages  the  upper  and  side  walls  thereof; 
j  so  that  it  will  not  readily  work  loose  in  use.  A  slot 
j|  or  kerf  £  is  then  formed  in  said  block  so  as  to  intersect 

I'1  the  opening  4.  This  slot  is  preferably  made  of  consider¬ 
able  length  and  depth  so  as  to  form  a  channel  extending 
about  the  stylus  from  one  side  to  the  opposite  side  thereof i 
I!  As  shown  in  the  drawings,  an  open  slot  is  formed  in  a 
I  quasi-segmental  form  in  the  forward  lower  end  of  the  lever. 
The  stylus  having  been  mounted  in  the  opening  £  so  as  to 

I  rest  in  engagement  with  the  upper  and  side  walls  thereof, 
solder  or  braze  is  applied  to  the  slot  or  kerf  £  and  the 

I  opening  £  so  as  to  braze  the  stylus  in  place.  Any  suitable 
solder  or  braze  may  be  used  for  this  purpose.  By  means 
of  the  slot  £,  this  solder  is  permitted  to  flow  freely 
I  about  the  stylus  into  the  opening  £  so  that  the  stylus  is 
I  securely  held  or  anchored  in  place.  I  next  cut  away  the 
j  superfluous  material  of  the  block  on  the  dotted  lines 
indicated  in  Figures  2  and  3  to  form  the  stylys  lever  into 
the  proper  shape.  Obviously,  however,  the  stylus  lever  mig 
be  formed  of  the  desired  shape  before  the  stylus  is  mounted 
therein. 

In  Figure  1,  I  have  shown  my  improved  stylus 
mounting  applied  to  a  reproducer  of  a  type  described  and 
claimed  in  the  application  of  Thomas  A.  "Edison,  Serial  Ho. 

3 


1  627,139  2  filed  on  yay  18,  1911.  in  this  figure,  7 
represents  the  stylus  lever  which  is  pivotally  mounted 
i!  on  a  floating  weight  8  supported  from  the  diaphragm  casing 
j|  9  as  hy  a  spring  10.  The  numeral  11  represents  the 
||  connection  between  the  stylus  lever  and  diaphragm.  My 
j|  invention  may  obviously  be  applied  to  any  other  type  of 
i|  reproducer  than  that  shown. 

i1  while  i  have  shown  a  preferred  embodiment  of 


S  my  invention,  numerous  modifications  fall  within  the 
!|  scope  of  the  same.  I  wish,  therefore,  not  to  be  limited 
to  the  exact  details  shown  and  described,  hut  what  I  claim 
'!  and  desire  to  protect  by  letters  Patent  is  as  follov/s; 

j:  1.  As  a  new  article  of  ira.nuf ac ture ,  a  stylus  lever 

ji  having  a  stylus  brazed  therein,  substantially  as  described, 


!  2.  In  a  device  of  the  class  described,  a  stylus 

|  support  having  an  opening  therein  and  a  stylus  soldered 
I;  in  said  opening,  the  said  support  having  also  a  recess 
i  intersecting  said  opening  to-  ensure  a  proper  distribution 
jj  of  the  solder  about  said  stylus,  substantially  as  described 


3.  In  a  device  of  the  class  described,  a  stylus 
support,  having  an  opening  therein  and  a  diamond  stylus 
having  an  irregular  unfinished  portion  brazed  in  said 
opening,  the  said  support  having  also  a  slot  or  kerf  inter¬ 
secting  said  opening  and  extending  to  the  exterior  of 
said  support  to  ensure  a  proper  distribution  of  the  braze 
or  solder  about  said  stylus,  substantially  as  described. 


4.  In  a  device  of  the  class  described,  a  stylus 
support,  having  an  opening  therein  and  a  diamond  styluG 


having  an  irregular  unfinished  portion  brazed  in  aaid 
opening  und  engaging  the  walls  thereof,  the  said  support 
having  also  a  slot  or  kerf  intersecting  said  opening  and 
extending  to  the  exterior  of  said  support  to  ensure  a 
proper  distribution  of  the  braze  or  solder  about  said  stylus 
jj  substantially  as  described. 


| 


tie,,. 

\ 


The  method  of  mounting  a  stylus  in  the  support 
I  which  consists  in  forming  in  the  support  an  opening  to 
jj  receive  Vhe  stylus  and  a  slot  intersecting  said  opening, 
jj  placing  the  stylus  in  the  opening  in  the  support,  and 
ji  applying  solder  to  said  opening  and  slot  to  secure  the 
jj  stylus  in  position,  substantially  as  described. 


6.  The  Vaethod  of  mounting  a  styl"s  in  its  support 
which  consists 'in  forcing  in  the  support  an  opening  of  a 
size  adapting  the  body  of  the  stylus  to  approximately  fit 
the  same  and  also\a  slot  intersecting  said  opening,  placing 
the  body  of  the  stylus  in  the  opening  in  the  support,  and 

(applying  solder  to  said  opening  and  slot  to  Becure  the 
Btylus  in  position,  substantially  as  described. 

j  7 .  The  method  ofWounting  a  stylus  in  its'  support 
jiwhich  consists  in  forming  in  the  support  an  opening  provided 
jjwith  an  end  wall,  said  opening  being  of  a  size  adapting  the 
body  of  the  stylus  to  approximately  fit  the  same,  forming 
slot  intersecting  said  opening,  placing  the  body  of  the 
jstylus  in  the  opening  in  the  support  in  engagement  with 
'paid  end  wall ,  and  applying  solder  to  said  opening  and  slot 
j|to  secure  the  stylus  in  position1,  substantially  as  described 


1 


I! 


'fjis  Specification  Signeb  anb  toitncsseb  tfjis  /  y  bay  oy^^y  1907 

«/■_ . '^Vtsm—n^c  _ 


2 ..Z^v-frr 


©atb. 


g>tatc  of  J!elu  Jersey  1 
County  of  CSSex 


sherwood  t.  hoorts  ,  tfjc  abobe  nameb 
petitioner,  being  bulp  stoorn,  beposes  anb  saps  tfjat  ije  is  a  citizen  of  tfje  ©niteb 
States,  anb  a  reSibent  Of  West  Orange,  RBsex  Oounty,  New  Jersey 


tfjat  fje  berilp  beliebes  fjimself  to  be  tfje  original,  first  anb  Sole  inbentor  of  tlje 
improbements  in  phonographs 


beScribeb  anb  claitneb  in  tfje  annexeb  Specification;  tfjat  fje  boes  not  fenoto  anb 
boes  not  beliebe  tfjat  tfje  Same  bias  eber  fenoton  or  uscb  before  fjis  inbention  or 
biscoberp  tfjereof;  or  patcuteb  or  beScribeb  in  anp  printeb  publication  in  tfje 
®niteb  states  of  America  or  anp  foreign  country  before  fjis  inbention  or 
biscoberp  tfjereof,  or  more  tjjan  tbio  pears  prior  to  tfjis  application;  or  patenteb 
in  anp  country  foreign  to  tlje  Uniteb  States  on  an  application  fileb  more  tfjan 
ttoelbe  montfjs  prior  to  tfjis  application ;  or  in  public  use  or  on  sale  in  tfje 
Uniteb  States  for  more  tfjan  ttuo  pears  prior  to  tfjis  application ;  anb  tfjat  no 
application  for  patent  upon  saib  inbention  fjas  been  fileb  bp  fjim  or  fjis  legal 
representatibes  or  assigns  in  anp  foreign  country. 


££>b)orn  to  anb  subscribeb  before  me  tfjis  tf/  bap  of^^y  19^ 


r^eal] 


*■*' '  'Jiotarp'  public. 


1‘leme  find  below  a  commu.nUa.tion  from  the  EXAMINER  in  oharge  of  your  application. 

for  Phonographs,  filed  July  21,  1911,  serial  number  439,710. 


Claims  1  to  4  inclusive  are  drawn  to  a  article  while  claims 
.1  to  7  xx  inclusive  are  drawn  to  a  method.  Inasmuch  as  the 
article  could  he  produ  ed  hy  other  methods  than  that  claimed 
the  article  and  the  method  arc  held  to  nh  ho  separate  invent 3 ons 
and  division  is  required  according  to  the  provisions  of  rule  42. 

In  omen ding  this  ease  applicant  should  consult. 

Edison  Aug.  7,  1900,  •  £55,460  (101-10-) 

Edison  June  17,  1090  450,270  (1S1-10) 

Macdonald  Oct.  ’21,  1902  711,706  (101-2) 

EnglBsh  potent  to  Junghenkor  nt  al,  way  31,  1902 
12,456,  (181-11)  English  patent  to  Oakford,  Sept.  26, 
1903  20,768,  (181010). 


c/ 


IH  THE  UNIT3D  STATUS  PATENT  OFFICE 


Sherwood  T.  No ore 
fEOSO  GRAPHS 
Filed  July  81,  1911 
Serial  Ho.  659,716 

HONORABLE  COMMISSIONER  OF  PATENTS, 

SIR: 

In  response  to  the  Office  notion  of 
September  9,  1911,  please  amend  the  above  entitled  oase  as 
follows : - 

Cancel  claims  5  to  7  inclusive. 

R  E  U  A  R  K  S 

The  Examiner’s  requirement  for  division  has 
been  complied  with,  and  aotion  on  the  merits  of  the  claims 
now  in  the  case  is  respectfully  roquested.  The  right  is 
reserved  to  file  a  divisional  application  on  the  subject 
matter  of  the  oanoeled  olairos. 

Rcspeotfully  submitted , 

S TER WOOD  T.  MOORE i 


His  Attorney 


Orange ,  ITew  Jersey 
August  ,  1912. 


2-3r  «°°m . 371 

J.H.i>.-Sut. 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 


WASHINGTON 


Sherwood  T.  Moore, 

Care  Prank  L.  Dyer, 

Orange,  New  Jersey  . 


asc  find  below  a  communication,  from  the  EXAMINER  in  charge  of  your  application. 


I  0,S.  PATPT  OFFICE, 

SEP  271912 

1  MAILED^, 


for  Phonographs, filed  July  21, 1911, serial  number  639,716  . 


Claim  1  is  rejeoted  upon  Jetter,July  30,1912, 

#1,034,387,  (181-11),  also  upon  either  Edison  of  record  or  Heady 
May  15,1906,  #020,926,  (101-11),  or  Levin, qept.  19,1911,  #1,003,- 
474,  (181-11),  Soldering  is  held  to  he  the  patentahlo  equivalent 
of  cement ing. 

Claim  2  is  rejected  upon  Jotter,  Levin  or  Head  for  the  reasons 
given. 

Claims  3  and  4  are  rejected  upon  the  references  and  reasons 
given  in  view  of  any  diamond  stylus  as  in  Jungbeoker  of  record. 

No  invention  is  found  in  previd.trtg^rougli  surface  on  the 
diamond  as  such  is  a  common  expedient  in  cementing  and  soldering 
when  a  strong  connection  is  desired  . 


... J$W.  !<-«,«,  J ._. 


OLt-j . <y>^  SLcfl  cLt^u_tnt<?^ 

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Patent  Series 
Patent  Application  Files 


Folio  #  770  Electroplating  Apparatus 

U.S.  Patent#:  1016875 

Primary  Applicant:  Edison,  Thomas  A 


Date  Executed: 


7/24/1911 


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Patent  Series 


Patent  Application  Files 

Folio#  772  Storage  Battery  Motor  Sets 

Serial  #:  642072 

Primary  Applicant:  Edison,  Thomas  A 
Date  Executed:  8/1/1911 


Folio  No.J7  7<3i . 


Serial  NoAilr£,...e>~7~2j 


Applicant. 

:  enyt. 


Address. 


Title 

C 

Filed  .ikcf.  <$ 

Assignee 

Ass’g’t  Exec . Recorded . Liber  Page 

Patent  Issued . .  :  V-L.  A..  .* . 

ACTIONS. 


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& 


in 

FRANK  -fa:— DVBR, 

Counsel,  As 

Orange,  New  Jersey. 


Petition. 


TEo  tf)t  Commissioner  of  patents: 

gout  petitioner  thomas  a.  edisoit 

a  citizen  of  tije  fHnitcb  States,  resibing  anb  Ijabing  a  Post  ©ffice  abbreSS  at 

Llewellyn  Park,  V/est  Orange,  Esae-x:  County,  New  Jersey 


praps  tfjat  letters  patent  map  be  granteb  to  bint  for  tfte  improbements  in 

STORAGE  BATTERY-MOTOR  SETS 


get  fortfj  in  tlje  annexeb  Specification ;  anb  fje  fjerebp  appoints  jFranU  TL.  ©per 
(Registration  i?o.  560),  of  ©range,  i2eto  Jersep,  Ijis  attornep,  toitlj  full 
potocr  of  Substitution  anb  rebocation,  to  prosecute  tljis  application,  to  malte 
alterations  anb  antenbments  therein,  to  receibe  tlje  patent,  anb  to  transact  all 
business  in  tlje  Patent  ©ffice  connected  tberetoitf). 


SPECIFICATION 


S  TO  ALL  WHOM  IT  MAY  CONCERN:-  I 

BE  IT  HNOWH,  that  I,  THOMAS  A.  EDISON,  a  oitizen 
of  the  United  States  and  a  resident  of  Llewellyn  Park,  j 

|  west  Orange,  Essex  County,  Hew  Jersey,  have  invented  oer- 

Itain  new  and  useful  improvements  in  STORAGE  BATTERY -MOTOR 
SETS,  of  whioh  the  following  is  a  specification: - 

My  invention  relates  to  storage  battery-motor  set 
!j  particularly  to  apparatus  of  this  oharaoter  intended  foz 
||  use  upon  vehicles  for  the  propulsion  of  the  same.  The  ob- 

Ijeot  of  my  invention  is  to  produoe  apparatus  of  this  kind 
oapable  of  being  supplied  at  a  muoh  lower  ooBt  than  hereto¬ 
fore,  and  more  particularly  to  reduoe  the  initial  oost  of 
eleotrio  delivery  wagons  so  as  to  bring  them  within  the 

ImeanB  of  small  dealers  who  deliver  artioles  from  their 
stores  to  their  customers. 

The  present  practice  in  the  manufacture  of  eleo- 
trioally  driven  vehioles,  suoh  as  truoks  and  automobiles, 

|  is  to  use  a  relatively  large  mimber  of  oells  and  high  volt- 

Iage.  For  example,  the  voltages  hitherto  used  in  ordinary 
praotioe  range  from  40  to  50  volts  for  the  small  eleotrio 
runabouts  to  as  high  as  75  to  80  volts  for  the  large  motor- 
driven  truoks.  In  order  to  obtain  suoh  voltageB,  a  com¬ 
paratively  large  number  of  storage  battery  oells  are  re¬ 
quired.  Suoh  an  equipment  is  liable  to  troubles  from 


(1) 


grounds  or  leakage  in  the  wiring,  batteries  or  motors,  on 
aooount  of  the  relatively  high  voltages  employed ,  and  is 
unneoessarily  expensive.  I  have  found  that  by  oertain 
modifications  of  the  motor  oonstruotion,  a  storage  battery 
of  muoh  lower  voltage  onn  be  used  effioiently  for  the  above 
purpose,  thus  seouring  a  relatively  inexpensive  equipment 
and  all  the  advantages  of  a  low  voltage  at  the  battery  and 
motor. 

My  invention  oonsists  in  the  employment  of  a 
relatively  small  number  of’  storage  battery  oeils  oapablo  of 
disoharging  at  a  very  high  rate  without  injury  to  the  bat¬ 
tery,  and  in  a  radical  departure  from  the  ordinary  design 
of  motors,  in  order  to  adapt  them  to  the  high  discharge  rat j 
batteries  and  to  enable  them  to  be  effioiently  operated  by 
a  relatively  small  number  of  oeils,  particularly  where  the 
vehicles  are  to  be  used  on  roads  having  excessive  grades 
and  necessitating  greatly  increased  power  at  times.  In 
ordinary  praotioe.the  battery  employed  is  more  expensive 
than  the  motor,  and  it  is  consequently  very  desirable  to 
diminish  the  number  of  oeils  of  the  battery  to  a  minimum, 
and  this  may  be  done  by  modifying  the  design  of  the  motor 
in  suoh  a  way  that  although  its  oost  is  inoreased,  the  add¬ 
ed  oost  will  be  but  a  fraotion  of  tbe  oost  of  the  battery 
suoh  as  is  ordinarily  employed  with  a  motor  designed  ao- 
oording  to  ordinary  praotioe.  Inasmuoh  as  a  relatively 
low  voltage  battery  is  to  be  used,  the  motor  must  be  de¬ 
signed  to  oarry  safely  a  very  large  ourrent  and  to  stand 
a  considerable  overload  for  long  periods  of  time.  The 
motor  in  my  improved  storage  battery-motor  set  is  oonstruo- 
ted  of  abnormally  low  internal  resistance,  and  all  of  the 
current-carrying  oonduotors  are  abnormally  large  in  oross 


(2) 


aeotion.  The  motor  armature  and  commutator  have  an  ah- 
normal  design  aa  related  to  eaoh  other.  Instead  of  the 
length  of  the  commutator  being  less  than  the  length  of  the 
armature,  as  is  customary  in  ordinary  praotioe,  the  commu¬ 
tator  is  made  equal  to  or  greater  than,  and  preferably 
|  substantially  twice  as  long  as  the  armature.  The  brush 

I'  area  for  talcing  off  the  current  is  two  or  more  times  great¬ 
er  than  in  ordinary  design,  so  that  the  loss  in  voltage 
when  ascending  steep  grades  is  not  greater  than  the  loss 
in  voltage  on  the  level  in  the  case  of  a  motor  of  ordinary 
design.  The  amount  of  oopper  used  to  energise  the  field 
is  made  double  or  nearly  so  that  employed  in  motors  as 
ordinarily  designed.  By  employment  of  my  invention.  I 
|  have  constructed  a  twenty-volt  motor  suitable  for  pro- 
J  peiimg  a  1500  lb.  delivery  wagon,  and  the  extra  expense 
S  of  the  lengthened  commutator  and  extra  oopper  in  the  wind- 

Iings  is  more  than  overcome  by  saving  of  a  number  of  oells 
of  storage  battery  oosting  three  or  more  times  as  much. 

My  improved  motor  is  so  designed  that  the  heating  is  enor¬ 
mously  diminished,  sparicing  is  eliminated,  and  the  whole 
combination  of  battery  and  motor  is  o^hejnost  effective 
and  reliable  character.  The  alkaline^or  Edison  type  of 
storage  battery  is  particularly  adapted  for  use  in  a 
,  storage  battery-motor  set  of  this  character,  because  this 
jj  type  of  battery  is  capable  of  discharging  at  an  enormously 
high  rate  without  injury  to  the  battery.  For  example, 
batteries  of  this  type  stand  repeated  discharges  at  240 
amperes,  or  300  percent  more  than  normal.  As  is  well 
lcnown,  discharge  rates  above  normal  are  very  injurious  to 
batteries  of  the  lead  type.  I  prefer  to  make  use  of  a 


(3) 


battery  of  oelln  of  the  Edison  type  in  which  the  thiokness 
of  the  pookets  ana  the  diameter  of  the  tubes  have  keen 
reduo ed  so  as  to  permit  an  inoreasea  number  of  plates  to 
oooupy  a  given  space  and  thereby  afford  an  increased  area 
of  aotive  surfaoe  per  unit  of  volume  or  weight. 

I  have  illustrated  one  embodiment  of  my  inven¬ 
tion  in  the  drawings  whioh  aooompany  and  form  a  part  of 
this  specification,  ana  in  whioh  - 

Figure  1  is  a  plan  view  of  the  running  gear  of 
a  vehicle  equipped  with  my  improved  storage  battery-motor 
set;  and 

Figure  2  is  a  view  partly  in  longitudinal  seotior 
through  the  motor. 

Throughout  the  several  views  of  the  drawing,  like 
reference  characters  are  employed  to  designate  like  parts. 

Referring  to  the  drawings,  a  set  of  storage  bat¬ 
teries  1  connected  in  series  by  suitable  connectors  2  is 
shown.  The  motor  is  shown  at  3  and  is  connected  in  aerie* 
with  the  battery  by  conductors  4  and  5.  A  controller  6 
of  ordinary  construction  Is  provided  in  one  of  the  con¬ 
ductors,  as  for  example ,  5.  The  outline  of  the  body  of 
the  vehiole  is  shown  at  7.  and  the  storage  battery  may  be 
carried  in  the  said  body.  The  wheels  of  the  vehicle  are 

shown  at  8,  9,  10  and  11.  The  motor  3  is  mounted  in  any 

suitable  manner  upon  the  running  gear  12.  The  motor  3 
is  provided  with  a  sprocket  wheel  14  secured  to  its  shaft. 
A  oounter shaft  15  is  revolubly  mounted  in  bearings  15'  on 
the  running  gear.  The  countershaft  15  is  provided  with 
sprocket  wheels  16,  17  and  18  secured  thereto.  The  sproo. 


(4) 


tot  wheel  17  is  situated  in  line  with  the  sprocket  wheel  14 
of  the  motor  and  the  chain  drive  19  is  provided  for  driving 
!  the  sprocket  wheel  1?  the  sprocket  wheel  14- 

j  vehicle  wheel  8  has  secured  to  it  and  concentrically  there- 
with  a  sprocket  wheel  22.  the  vohiole  v?hoel  ^  ***  BS" 

cured  to  it  and  concentrically  therewith  a  sprocket  wheel 
23.  The  chain  drive  21  connects  the  sprocket  wheels  22 
18  and  the  chain  drive  20  connects  the  sprocket  wheels 
23  sna  16.  Any  other  suitable  form  of  mechanism  may  be 
utilised  for  driving  the  vehicle  wheels  8  and  10  from  the 
I  motor  3. 

The  motor  comprises  a  casing  30  provided  with 
bearings  31  and  32  in  which  the  shaft  33  is  journaled, 
j  Pole  pieces  34,  preferably  of  laminated  iron,  are  mounted 
I  m  the  casing  in  any  suitable  manner,  and  these  pole  pieces 
are  provided  with  field  windings  35  preferably  of  heavy 
copper  strip.  She  motor  illustrated  is  a  two-pole  motor. 

The  armature  core  36  preferably  of  laminated  iron  is 
1  mounted  upon  shaft  33  and  carries  the  armature  windings 
j  37.  The  armature  winding  has  preferably  not  more  than 
j  one  turn  of  wire  per  coil.  The  commutator  segments  38 
are  mounted  upon  the  shaft  33  and  are  suitably  connected 
to  the  armature  windings  37.  Brushes  39 .  preferably  of 
oarbon.  are  provided  and  are  supported  in  brush  holders  40- 
The  brush  holders  40  are  provided  with  binding  posts  41  or 
other  suitable  means  for  connecting  the  motor  to  the  oon- 
ductors  4  and  5.  The  motor  is  preferably  series  connectedl 
!|  The  abnormal  length  of  commutator  as  compared  with  the  length 
of  armature  is  evident  from  an  inspection  of  Figure  2,  and 
it  will  also  be  noted  that  a  relatively  large  brush  area 


(5) 


Iie  provided.  Inasmuch  as  there  ie  only  one  turn  per 
ooil  of  the  armature,  the  voltage  between  the  segments 
of  the  armature  is  reduoed  to  a  very  small  amount  in  a 
20-volt  winding,  and  therefore,  there  is  no  tandenoy  what¬ 
ever  to  spark  or  flash  under  heavy  loads. 

Aotual  servioe  conditions  show  that  an  eleotrio 
!  vehiole  having  a  normally  low  current  of  say  75  ampereB 
I  when  running  on  the  level,  may  roquire  from  200  to  250 

I  amperes  when  olimbing,  or  on  bad  roads.  A  motor  of  ord¬ 
inary  design  with  a  relatively  small  commutator  and  light 
I  winding  in  the  armature  and  field  iB  very  liable  to  break 
|j  down  or  burn  out.  A  motor  oonotruoted  in  aooordanoe  with 
|  my  invention  will  withstand  these  extreme  conditions  of 

I !!  overloading  without  any  difficulty  whatever,  owing  to  the 
low  voltage  and  large  oroas  seotion  of  oonduotors  used. 

My  improved  motor  may  be  exposed  to  water  and  extreme  weath 
er  oonditions  without  any  damage  whatever,  and  furthermore, 
a  motor  of  this  oharaoter  is  well  adapted  for  continuous 
use  in  unskilled  hands.  Owing  to  the  low  voltage  used  in 
my  improved  system,  it  is  not  neoessary  that  the  motor  be 
made  completely  water  tight.  It  may  bo  left  relatively 

open  so  that  aotive  and  free  ventilation  on  all  parts  of 
commutator 

the  winding  and  the  ma.tax  is  permitted.  This  is  a  valu¬ 
able  feature  when  the  motor  is  subjected  to  heavy  and 
continuous  overloading,  for. in  suoh  a  oeae  a  oompletely 
enolosed  motor  is  liable  to  damage  from  overheating,  while 
an  open  motor  is  not  injured. 

Iln  apparatus  embodying  my  invention  which  I 
have  had  constructed  and  tested,  a  delivery  wagon  was 


(6) 


equipped  with  a  battery  of  16  A-8  Edison  oells,  the  voltage 
of  whioh  varied  from  about  18  volts  to  IS  during  the  tests, 
the  total  weight  of  the  outfit  was  about  S310  pounds,  and 
the  internal  resistanoe  of  the  motor  was  about  .026  ohmB. 


Having  now  described  my  invention,  what  I  claim 
and  desire  to  protoot  by  Letters  Patent  of  tho  United 
States  is  as  follows :- 

0  \  1.  In  a  storage  battery-motor  set,  the  combination 
with\m  oleotrio  motor  having  an  abnormally  extended  area 
of  bru^h  oontaot  at  tho  commutator,  and  a  storage  battery 
eleotrioally  oonneoted  to  said  motor  and  oapable  of  enor¬ 
mously  high\lisoharge  rates,  substantially  as  and  for  the 
purposes  set  fqrth. 

2.  In  a  storage  battery-motor  sot,  the  combination 
of  8n  eleotrio  motor,  of  abnormally  low  internal  resistanoe 
and  with  an  abnormallyiext ended  area  of  brush  oontaot  at 
tho  commutator,  and  a  stWage  battery  eleotrioally  connec¬ 
ted  therewith  and  oapable  of  an  enormously  high  discharge 
rate,  substantially  aB  and  for  the  purposes  set  forth. 

3.  In  a  storage  battery -nuxtor  set,  the  combination 
of  ah’  oleotrio  motor  having  an  abnormally  extended  area  of 

brush  oontaot  with  tho  oommi 

"A/"-  x 

of-th«-B«-iaon-type  eleotrioally  oonneoted  thorewith,  sub¬ 
stantially  as  and  for  tho  purposes  sot  forth. 


4.  An  eleotrio_ motor  for 
sets,  oomprising  an  armature  and  field,  and  a  oc 


i  with  storh^e  battery 

oonneoted  to  the  armature  and  of  a  length  substantial] 
same  or  greater  than  the  armature,  as  and  for  th^ 
purposes  set  forth. 


m 


II 


NS.  An  eleotrio  motor  for  nee  with  storage  battery 
seta  comprising.  a  field,  tho  windings  of  whxoh  are  insul¬ 
ated  copper  Strips  of  abnormally  low  resistance ,  and  an 
armature  mounted  rotate  with  rospeot  to  tho  field,  and 
a  oommutator  connected  to  the  armature  of  a  length  sub¬ 
stantially  equal  to  or  greater  than  the  armature,  as  and 
for  the  purposes  set  forth. 

6.  In  a  Btorage  battery-mo wr  set ,  the  combination 
of  an  eleotrio  motor  having  field  and  armature  windings 
of  abnormally  large  oross  seotion,  and  a  sWrage  battery 
oleotrioally  connected  therewith  and  oapable  oi\an  enor¬ 
mously  high  discharge  rate,  substantially  as  and  for*  the 
purposes  set  forth.  \ 

..  ...  .  ..  .*  7 


J,yu^h  &-  f/fy/y-  "  '  ?  2- 

C_  -  ^  -  ^VA-  " 


ZW  specification  Signet)  anti  tmtneSSetj  tljis  bap  of 

_ \Frut-a .  lif  fcfu » 


l  ■  tZltAst/U'1 . 


2 _ ^  ^  _ 


©atb. 


State  of  Jlebi  f ersep 
Countp  of  (Essex 


thomas  a.  edisoh  ,  tfje  abobe  nameb 
petitioner,  being  bulp  Sbiorn,  bepoSeS  anb  saps  tijat  ije  is  a  citizen  of  tfje  fHniteb 
States,  anb  a  resibent  of  Llewellyn  Park,  West  Orange,  ES3G.C  County 


New  Jersey 


tijat  ije  berilp  beliebes  ijimSelf  to  be  tije  original,  first  anb  Sole  inbentor  of  tfje 
improbements  in 

STOKACE  BATTERY -MOTOR  SETS 


beseribeb  anb  claimeb  in  tfje  annexeb  Specification;  tijat  ije  boeS  not  fenoto  anb 
boes  not  beliebe  tijat  tije  same  bias  ebec  fenobm  or  useb  before  ijis  inbention  or 
biscoberp  tijereof;  or  patenteb  or  beseribeb  in  anp  printeb  publication  in  tfje 
Uniteb  States  of  America  or  anp  foreign  countrp  before  ijis  inbention  or 
biscoberp  tijereof,  or  more  tijan  tbio  pears  prior  to  tijis  application;  or  patenteb 
in  anp  countrp  foreign  to  tije  Uniteb  States  on  an  application  fileb  more  ttjan 
tbiclbe  montijs  prior  to  tijis  application ;  or  in  public  use  or  on  sale  in  tije 
Huitcb  States  for  more  tijan  tbio  pears  prior  to  tijis  application ;  anb  tijat  no 
application  for  patent  upon  Saib  inbention  ijas  been  fileb  bp  ijirn  or  ijis  legal 
representatibes  or  assigns  in  anp  foreign  countrp. 

_ <TjL<s  £>oU*^: _ _ 

Sbiorn  to  anb  subscribeb  before  me  tijis  '  #  bap  of  A*f***"\W 


Jlotarp  public. 


[Seall 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 
UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 
WASHINGTON 

Thomas  A.  Edison, 

o/o  Prank  L.  Dyer, 

Orange,  Hew  Jersey. 

Please  find  below  a  communication  from  the  EXAMINER  in  charge  of  yonrUppUcation. 

G42  072rttSe  Battery_Motor  SstB»  filed  Aug.  3,  1911,  Serial  No. 

_ _  Commissioner  of  Patents. 

Claims  1,  2  and  6  are  rejected  as  manifest  aggregations  of  a 
motor  and  a  storage  battery.  If  a  storage  battery  is  only  capable 
of  furnishing  one  and  a  half  volts  there  would  furthermore  bo  no 
invention  required  to  select  a  translating  device  adapted  to  run 
in  connection  therewith;  it  would  bo  the  only  obvious  thing  to  do. 
Aside  from  the  merits  involved  theoe  claims  are  essentially  vague 
and  indefinite,  -  "abnormally  extended  area"  (claim  l)  and  "abnor¬ 
mally  low  internal  resistance"  (claim  2)  do  not  mean  anything  struc¬ 
turally,  and  in  claim  3  "battery  of  the  Edison  type",  besides  the 
same  objection  of  indefiniteness,  presents  the  further  objection 
that  the  Office  does  not  understand  what  type  1b  meant,  and,  more¬ 
over,  whatever  is  now  meant  it  would  probably  bo  Bubject  to  change 
and  variation  as  the  art  advances. 

Claims  3,  4  and  5  are  rejected  as  for  well-known  relations 
existing  in  a  certain  class  of  dynamoB  botv/oen  the  design  of  tho 
commutator  and  that  of  the  armature.  Note,  for  instance, 

Parsons,  344,542,  June  29,  1886,  Bipolar,  and  diagram  4  of  "Die 
Gleiohstrommaschine "  by  Arnold,  Berlin,  1907,  Julius  Springer,  the 
description  of  which  on  page  184  sets  forth  that  tho  useful  length 
of  the  commutator  is  39  cm,  whereas  the  useful  length  of  the  winding 
is  given  as  'S6-mmJ  These  throe  claims  are  rejected  on  either  of 
the  references  givon,  and  as  furthermore  presenting  only  matter  that 
would  be  obvious  to  any  machine  designer. 


November  11,  1911. 


IH  THE  TOUTED  STATES . PATENT  OPFIOE 


Thomas  A.  Edison  ) 
STORAGE  BATTERY  MOTOR  SETS  "  j 
Riled  August  3,  1911  } 
Serial  Ho.  642, 07^  ') 


Room  Ho. 


105. 


HONORABLE  COMMISSIOHER  OR  PATENTS , 

SIR: 

In  response  to  the  Offioe  action 
of  November  11,  1911,  please  amend  the  above  entitled  oase 
as  follows : - 


Claim  3,  line  2,  after  "motor"  insert  -  of  abnor¬ 
mally  low  internal  resistanoe  and  -  .  lino  3,  change  "a" 
to  -  an  alkaline  -  .  Line  4,  oanoel  "of  the  Edison  type". 

Claim  4,  line  2,  after  "sets"  insert  -  and  adapted 
for  operation  at  moderate  speeds  -  . 

Claim  5,  line  2,  after  "seta"  insert  -  and  adapted 
for  operation  at  moderate  speeds,  -  • 

Add  the  following  olaim:  - 

— - - _ _ _ _ _ _ 


In  apparatus  of  the  olasB  described,  the  combina¬ 
tion  of'S>d^iven  meDber  required  to  transmit  torque  varying 
through  wide  limirts^/an  eleotrio  moto^)  operatively  oonneoted| 
to  said  member  for  drivihg^ttie  same,  a^storage  battery^ for 
supplying  ourrent  to  the  motorfead^oapable  of  discharging 
at  a  rate  greatly  in  excess  of  normal/'b&4d  excessive  dis¬ 
charge  rate  being  neoeoeary  and  sufficient  to  operate  the 
motor  to  oause  the  driven  member  to  transmit  its  maximt 


Q*' 


■  e.w  ,  -J  <Uf. 

torque.,'  and  said  motor  having  a  sufficiently .  low  internal 
roaiatanoe  ahd~-8uffioiont/ large  (commutator  and  bruah  oon- 
taot  area)  to  enable  the  'motqr^to  operate  when  oarrying 
aaid  exoeesive  di8oharge  without  Excessive  loaa  in  voltage 
in  the  motor,  aubatantinlly  a8  described. 

H  EM  A  R-K  S 


Tho  Office  action  of  November  11,  1911  haa  boon 
carefully  oonaidered.  Applicant’ a  invention  involves  a 
marked  departure  from  standard  praotioo  in  storage  battery 
motor  sets  used  in  the  propulsion  of  vehicles  and  fo r  simi¬ 
lar  purposes,  and  his  improved  motor  involves  features  dif¬ 
fering  in  a  marked  degree  from  standard  design.  It  is 
thought  that  these  features  are  properly  expressed  by  the 
expressions  "abnormally  oxtended  area"  and  "abnormally  low 
internal  resistance"  contained  in  certain  of  the  olaims, 
the  word  "abnormally"  meaning  a  marked  departure  from  stand¬ 
ard  praotioe.  The  Examiner  is  therefore  requested  to  With¬ 
draw  hiB  objection  to  these  terms. 

Claim  3  haa  been  amended  to  overoomo  the  Examiner1 3 
objection  to  defining  the  battery  as  a  "battery  of  the  Edi¬ 
son  type".  The  patent  to  Parsons,  No.  344,543,  shows  ap¬ 
paratus  vory  different  from  applicant’s  apparatus  and  in¬ 
tended  for  a  very  different  purpose.  This  patent  shows  a 
gonerator  intended  to  be  operatod  at  an  excessively  high 
speed,  that  is  to  say,  at  a  speed  of  from  10,000  to  25,000 
revolutions  per  minute.  Applicant's  motor  is  intended  to 
be  operated  at  ordinary  motor  speeds ,  one  of  tho  machines 
embodying  tho  invention  having  been  constructed  to  operate 
at  a  speed  of  1700  revolutions  per  minute.  The  distinction! 


(2) 


that  the  motor  is  adapted  to  operate  at  moderate  speedB  has 
been  introduced  into  claims  4  and  5.  She  Examiner  also  re' 
fere  to  "Die  Gleiohstrommasohine"  by  Arnold,  and  applicant 
has  had  his  representative  look  up  this  reference  in  the 
Patent  Offioe  and  haB  been  informed  that  the  oitation  is 
inoorreotly  given  in  tho  Offioe  letter.  She  diagram  in¬ 
tended  to  be  cited  is  understood  to  show  a  turbo  generator, 
and  the  argument  made  in  oonneotion  with  tho  patent  to 
Parsons  is  believed  to  bo  applicable  to  the  structure  shown 
in  Arnold.  Applicant  appears  to  be  the  first  to  use  a 
storage  battery  aapable  of  enormously  high  discharge  rates 
oombined  with  an  electric  motor  of  abnormally  low  internal 
resistance  and  abnormally  extended  area  of  brush  oontaot 
with  the  commutator,  and  by  this  combination  he  has  at¬ 
tained  oertain  useful  results  which  are  set  forth  fully  in 
the  speoifioation. 

In  now  olaim  7  added  by  the  above  amendment ,  an 
attempt  is  made  to  Bet  forth  the  relation  between  the  maxi¬ 
mum  torque  transmitted  by  the  driven  member  and  the  excess¬ 
ive  discharge  rate  of  the  storage  battery.  Applicant1 b 
invention  has  been  thoroughly  tested  in  a  practical  manner 
and  is  believed  to  have  great  merit. 

Hooonsideration  and  allowance  are  requested. 

Respectfully  submitted, 

THOMAS  A.  EDISOIt 

By.  _ 

HiB  Attorney 

Orange,  New  Jersey 
November  8th,  1912. 


department  of  the  interior 
UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 

WASHINGTON  January  6,  1913. 


Thomas  A.  Edison, 

o/o  Frank  L.  Dyer, 


Please  find,  below 

for  Storage 
642,072. 


Orange,  M.  J . 

a  eommunicalion.  from  the  EXAMINER  i»  charge  of  year  application,. 

Battery-Motor  9ata.  filed  Aug.  3,  1911.  Serial  Mo. 


Commissioner  of  J’atenb 


In  responoe  to  amendment  of  llov.  9,  1912. 

The  objection  urged  against  the  expressions  "abnormally 
extended  area"  and  "abnormally  low  internal  resistance"  eoeme  to 
he  proper  and  in  therefore  repeated.  Further,  the  expressions 
employed  in  the  new  claim  7  "at  a  rate  greatly  in  oxcobb  of  normal" 
and  "efficiently  low  internal  resiotanoo  and  efficiently  large 
commutator  and  brush  contact  area,  eto."  are  equally  vague, 
indefinite  and  objectionable. 

It  ie  alao  true  that  standard  practice  with  regard  to  area  of 
commutator  and  brush  contact  surface  is  to  proportion  the  area  to 
the  current,  and  it  doea  not  appear  that  the  applicant  haB  in  any 
manner  whatsoever  departed  from  such  standard  practice.  Bee.  for 
example,  the  General  Electric  Company's  Bulletin  Ho.  4.350,  Pub. 
April,  1904.  by  the  Power  and  Mining  Department,  especially  the 
illustration  on  page  4  and  the  list  of  plating  dynamos  at  the  top 
of  page  8. 

~ ”  claims  1.  2.  6  and  7  are  rejected  as  obvious  aggregations  of 

motor  and  storage  battery.  See  the  first  paragraph  of  the  last 
Office  letter.  Claim  7  in  faot  covors  norely  a  driven  member 
on  which  the  load  varies  widely, and  a  storage  battery  and  motor 
adapted  to  work  together  and  to  do  the  work  neceseary.  Ho  one 


642,072,  —  2. 


oan  monopolize  such  a  combination  and,  in  foot,  to  employ  a  etorage 
battery  and  a  motor  which  were  not  adapted  to  work  together  and 
would  not  do  tho  work  would  bo  oontrnry  to  the  diotateo  of  reason. 

Tho  above  olaima  oover  an  alleged  combination  clearly  divisi- 
ble  from  the  generator  olaima  numbered  3,  4  and  B  and  divioion  is 
therefore  required  between  the  two  groups. 

Cl aims  3,  4  and  8  are  rejected  upon  the  references  of  record 
and  upon  tho  Oenoral  Electric  Bulletin,  above. 

No  further  action  on  the  merits  will  be  given  until  the 
requirement  for  division  has  been  complied  with. 


IH  THE  UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 


Thomas  A.  Edison 
STORAGE  BATTERY  MOTOR  SETS 
Filed  August  3,  X9XX 
Serial  No.  642,072 


Room  Ho.  105. 


HONORABLE  COMMISSIONER  OF  PATENTS, 

SIR: 

In  response  to  the  Offioe  aotion  of 
January  6,  1913,  please  amend  the  above  entitled  oaae  as 
follows : - 


Page  3,  line  22,  after  "alkaline"  insert  - 
niokel-iron  -  . 

Rewrite  the  olaims  as  follows:  - 

t'he^oo  mb  in- 

ation  of  a  driven  member  required  to  transmit  torque  vary¬ 
ing  through  wide  limits,  a  series  eleotrio  motor  operativelyj 
oonnooted  to  saia  member  for  driving  the  Bame,  ana  a  stor¬ 
age  battery  for  supplying  current  to  the  motor  oupable  of 
discharging  at  a  rate  in  excess  of  normal,  necessary  Bnd 
sufficient  to  operate  the  motor  to  oause  the^d riven  member 
to  transmit  the  maximum  torque  required ,  f  «wh)said  motor 
having  low  internal  resistance  in  both  field  and  armature 
windings  and  having  brush  and  commutator  oontaot  area  at 
j|  least  twice  as  great  as  required  by  the  rules  of  ordinary 
ilign^subst ant i ally^ as  described. 

2.  In  apparatus  of  the  olasB  described,  the  oombin- 
I  ation  of  a  driven  member  required  to  transmit  torque  vary- 


ing  through  wide  limits,  a  series  eleotrio  motor  operativeljr 
connected  to  saia  member  for  driving  the  same,  und  a  stor- 
I  age  battery  for  supplying  ourrent  to  the  motor  oapable  of 
disoharging  at  a  rate  in  excess  of  normal,  neoessary  and 
sufficient  to  operate  the  motor  to  eausa  tho^ driven  member 
to  transmit  the  maximum  torque  required .fend} said  motor 
having  low  internal  resistance  and  having  brush  and  oommu-  j 
tator  oontaot  area  sufficiently  great  to  substantially 
eliminate  sparking  even  when  the  motor  is  supplied  with  j 
I  ourrent  at  the  aforesaid  exoessive  rate,  substantially  as 
!  described. 

ij - 

$  E  M  A  R  K  S 


The  olaimB  have  been  rewritten  with  a  view  to 
setting  forth  applicant's  invention  more  accurately  and  to 
avoid  the  Examiner's  objections.  It  Us  believed  that  these 
olaims  oannot  be  considered  as  aggregations  inasmuch  as  the 
elements  reoited  in  eaoh  of  them  ooaot  to  produoo  a  unitary 
result.  In  thiB  oonneotion  the  Examiner's  attention  is 
o ailed  to  a  recent  deoision  of  the  Cirouit  Court  of  Appeals 
for  the  Seventh  Cirouit .Krell  Auto  Grand  Piano  Co.  of 
America  vs.  Story  &  Clark  Co.  et  al.,  207  E.  R. ,  946,  see 
particularly  951,  in  which  the  Court  makes  the  following 
statement 


"In  another  sense  (whioh,  in  the  interest  of 
aoourate  terminology,  might  well  be  taken  as  the  ex¬ 
clusive  sense)  'aggregation'  moans  that  the  olaims, 
in  and  of  themselves,  independently  of  the  prior  art, 
show  that  the  elements  are  incapable  of  ooaoting  to 
produoe  a  unitary  result." 


The  General  Eleotrio  Company's  Bulletin  oited 
shows  merely  a  solf-exoited  (presumably  shunt)  or  separately 

(2) 


0xo it e a  generator  designed  to  generate  currants  of  large 
amperage  at  low  voltages,  and  while  a  long  commutator  is 
UBea,  this  oommutator  appears  to  bo  dosigned  in  aooordanoe 
with  the  rules  of  ordinary  design  to  take  oare  of  the 
large  amount  of  current  carried  by  it.  Similarly,  in  the 
patent  to  Parsons  cited, -the  high  speed  generator  shown  is 
provided  with  a  long  oommutator,  but  there  1b  no  suggestion 
that  the  brush  oontaot  area  is  made  abnormally  great,  as 
is  the  case  in  applicant* b  invention.  In  applicant's  im¬ 
proved  motor,  the  brush  oontaot  area  is  made  two  or  more 
times  greater  than  the  ordinary  design  -  Bee  specification, 
page  3.  In  other  words,  applioant  hasnot  merely  inoreased 
the  brush  oontaot  area  sufficiently  to  oarry  the  current 
used,  but  has  inoreaBed  it  in  a  much  greater  proportion. 

The  oommutator  brush  area  in  applioant* s  improved  apparatus 
is  far  in  exoesB  of  that  heretofore  considered  neoeoBary 
and  generally  adopted  to  oarry  the  current  used.  3y  us¬ 
ing  suoh  an  abnormal  oontaot  area  relative  to  the  voltage 
and  ourrent,  applioant  is  enabled  to  reduoe  the  resistance 
at  the  oommutator  to  the  smallest  possible  amount  and  at 
the  same  time,  if  desired,  the  pressure  of  eaoh  oarbon 
brush  upon  the  oommutator  may  be  diminished  as  compared 
with  the  pressure  ordinarily  used,  so  that  the  resistance 
of  the  bridge  of  oarbon  across,  the  oommutator  bars  may  be 
made  very  high,  thus  tending  to  reduoe  the  armature  woste 
in  momentarily  short -air ouited  ooils.  The  employment  of 
the  exaessivo  brush  oontaot  aroa  substantially  eliminates 
sparking,  even  on  heavy  loads,  and  renders  unnecessary  the 
use  of  commutating  polos  or  othor  devioes  to  reduoe  spark - 
ing  or  to  save  the  oommutator  from  outting  and  wearing. 


(3) 


Applicant's  invention  involves  a  marked  departure 
from  previous  praotioe,  bas  proved  to  be  of  great  utility, 
and  is  believed  to  be  deserving  of  patent  proteotion. 

Reoonsidorq.tion  and  allowance  are  requested . 
Respeotfully  submitted, 

THOMAS  A.  EDI SOH 

(  By  *&-***■&■  <£•  — 

His  Attorney 

Orange,  ITeyf  Jersey 
January  3rd,  1914 


Dlv.  ..S 


. 6 . 


voo 

DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 


UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 

WASHINGTON  . *ebrnary..lO,.Jv914,. 


Please  find  below  a  communication  from  the  EX  AM!  HER  in  charge  of  the  application  of 

af  1911,  for 

Storage  Batttry-Kotor  Seta. 


In  response  to  amendment  of  Jan.  8,  1914. 

The  now  olaimo  are  rejeoted  as  unpatentable  oomblnatione  of 
niotor  and  storage  battery.  The  ground  of  this  rejection  is  that 
it  involve e  merely  the  skill  to  be  expected  of  the. electrician  jfco. 
use  battery  and  motor  whloh  are  adapted  to  work  together  in  the 
old  combination. 

As  to  the  proportions  which  the  olaime  specify  in  the  motor 
design,  it  is  held  that  if  there  be  departure  from  "the  rules  of 
Ordinary  design",  suoh  departure  is  one  in  degree  and  not  in  kind. 

It  1b,  however,  old,  as  shown  by  the  references  of  record.,  to 
■  employ  a, commutator  whose  length  is  greater  than  that  of  the- arma¬ 
ture  core;  thus  the  applicant  hao  not  departed  fiom  ordinary  prac¬ 
tice  in  this  respect.  A&  to  the  brush  oontact  area;  he  alleges 
-  jjieparture,  but  doeB  not  state  either  what  the  ordinary  praotloe 
allows  in  amperes  per  cm2  nor  what  he  himself  employs. 


IN  THE  UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 


Thomas  A.  Edison 

STORAGE  BATTERY  MOTOR  SETS 

Filed  August  S,  1911  Room  No.  106. 

Serial  No.  642,072 

HONORABLE  COMMISSIONER  OF  PATENTS, 

SIR: 

In  response  to  the  Office  action  of 
February  10,  1914,  ploase  amend  the  above  entitled  oase 
as  follows : - 

^Claim  1,  lino  8,  oanool  "and". 

S  Claim  2,  lino  8,  cancel  "and". 

REMARKS 

The  Examiner  Btates  that  the  ground  of  rejection 
of  the  claims  is  that  it  involves  merely  the  skill  to  bo 
expeoted  of  an  electrician  to  use  a  battery  and  motor  which 
are  adapted  to  work  together  in  an  old  combination.  Ap¬ 
plicant  has  not  morely  uBod  a  battery  and  motor  adapted  to 
work  together,  but  in  the  combinations  claimed  there  is  a 
motor  especially  adapted  for  use  with  a  battery  having  cer¬ 
tain  characteristics  set  forth  in  the  claims,  the  deBign 
of  the  motor  being  abnormal  as  compared  with  ordinary  prac¬ 
tice,  and  the  entire  combination  being  capable  of  aocomplis}- 
ing  a  certain  desirod  result  with  an  efficiency  ana  oeonomj 
constituting  a  marked  advanoo  in  the  art.  Certain  ad¬ 
vantages  of  applicant's  improved  battery-motor  set  have  beet 
pointed  out  in  the  specification  and  in  prior  arguments, 

and  ospooial  attention  is  directed  to  tho  following  points 
Decreased  liability  to  leakages  and  grounds  because  of 

possibility  of  using  low  voltages;  diminution  of  heating} 


fl) 


substantial  elimination  of  sparking;  light  brush  load; 
reduction  of  -roar  of  brushes,  due  to  tho  decreased  brush 
pressure  porminniblo.  Applioant'o  improved  battery  motor 
set  is  well  adapted  for  continuous  use  in  unskilled  hands. 

It  is  well  reoognisod  by  the  oourts  that  a  change 
in  proportion  of  parts  may  amount  to  invention  if  a  new 
function  or  a  particular  new  and  useful  result  are  accom¬ 
plished  thereby.  In  applicant’s  Improved  batteryrmotor 
sot,  tho  motor  is  abnormal  in  design  as  oompared  with 
ordinary  practice  in  several  respects,  and  by  the  use  of 
suoh  a  motor  with  a  suitable  battery  the  particular  new 
and  useful  results  mentioned  above  are  attained. 

!Phe  Examiner  states  that  it  is  old  to  employ  a 
commutator  whose  length  is  fereater  than  that  of  the  arma¬ 
ture  core.  An  inspection  of  the  claims  will  show  that 
applicant  is  not  relying  for  the  patentability  of  his  in¬ 
vention  upon  the  use  of  a  long  commutator.  In  one  of 
applicant's  improved  battery  motor  sots,  applicant  -used 
for  the  motor  brushes  a  special  kind  of  high  oonduotive 
metal  carbon  rated  by  tho  manufacturer  to  carry  normally 
100  amperes  per  a guar a  inch.  In  the  said  motor  as  designed 
by  applicant,  suoh  great  brush  contact  area  was  provided 
that  the  current  density  was  only  about  45  amperes  per 
square  inch  at  meximum  load.  The  Examiner  is  requested 
to  again  consider  carefully  the  argument  aeoompanying  the 
amendment  of  January  3,  1914. 

Reconsideration  and  allowance  are  roquestod. 

Respeotfully  submitted, 

THOMAS  A.  EDISON 
<4 
His 


Attorney 


Orange,  New  Jersey 
February  3  ,  1916 

Hl-JS 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 

UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 

WASHINGTON  _ JUar.cb--iT--l&15-.- 


Please  find  below  a  communication  from  the  EXAMINER  in  charge  of  the  application  of 
TVintnnB  A.  Mi  8011  .  S^-B  * 


Ser .  Mo.,. -MS^fiZSj. — 


Oommmioner  of  Patents.  (J 


In  response  to  amendment  filed  Feb.  4,  1015. 

The  results  enumerated,  and  alleged  to  be  new  and  useful, 
are  rio  doubt  useful,  but  are  not  jiew,  and  are  attained  by  the  obvious 
apjli  cation  of  the  skill  to  be  expected  or  the  electrical  artisan. 

As  before  stated,  it  would  be  contrary  to  the  diotaten  of  reason  to 
use  motor  and  battery 'which  were  not  oapablc  of  taking  euro  of  the 
temporary  overloads  and’ adapted  to  work  together.  Moreover ,  now  that 
the  applicant  has  stated  what  current  density  he  uoos,  it  io  possible 
to  cite  references  shov/ins;  that  he  h.13  depurted  little  if  at  all  from 
common  praotice.  ^Arnold  in  "Me  Gleighatromraasohino"  cited,  Vol.  1, 
no.  147  and  following,  gives  data  of  a  number  of  machines,  of  which 
only  five  of  the  firat  thirteen  are  designed  for  higher  densities 
thun  45  amperes  per  square  inch.  Gee  especially  machine  #12,  with 
denai  ty  of  32  .8 ,  and  also  #7 ,  i/8 ,  !/9  and  'll  3 . 

TVie  olaims  are  thorofore  rejected,  and.  thin  action  may  be 
considered  final  for  the  purposes  of  appeal  if  applicant  bo  desires.  ; 


Acting  Exuminer  -  1)1  vi  si  on  116. 

yS'. 

J 

2,7.0  u>f0,  12*-  F  30 


HOJIORABLE  COMMISSIOHER  OR  PASEHBS, 

SIR: 

In  response  to  the  Office  action  of 
March  S,  1915,  please  amend  the  above  entitled  case  as 
follows :- 

Claim  1,  liAeTl,  change  "of  the  class  described" 
to  -  for  the  propulsion  of  an  electric  vehicle  -  .  Last 
line,  after  "design"  insert  -  for  vehicle  motors  -  . 

I  Add  the  following  claim:  -  , 

3.  In  a  storage  battery  motor  set  for  the  pro¬ 
pulsion  of  an  electric  vehicle,  the  combination  of  a  driven 
member  adapted  to  transmit  torque  varying  through  wide  lim¬ 
its,  a  series  electric  motor  of  low  internal  resistance 
operatively  connected  to  said  member  for  driving  the  same , 
and  a  low  voltage  storage  battery  for  supplying  current  to 
the  motor  oapable  of  discharging  at  a  rate  in  excess  of 
normal,  necessary  and  sufficient  to  operate  the  motor  to 
cause  the  driven  member  to  transmit  the  maximum  torque  re¬ 
quired,  said  motor  having  itB  commutator  length  equal  to  or 
greater  than  its  armature  length  and  having  its  field  coils 
of  at  least  twice  the  current  carrying  capacity  and  its 


brush  and  commutator  contact  area  at  least  tv; ice  as  great 
as  is  required  by  tho  rules  of  ordinary  design  for  vehicle 

motors,  substantially  as  described^  -  _  _ _ 

REMARKS 

The  ground  of  rejection  set  forth  in  the  Offioe 
letter  of  March  3,  1916  is  not  entirely  clear,  but  it  is 
apparently  the  Examiner's  position  that  applicant's  improved 
storage  battery  motor  set  lacks  invention,  inasmuch  as  he 
states  that  tho  results  are  attained  by  the  obvious  appli¬ 
cation  of  tho  skill  to  bo  expected  of  the  electrical  artisanJ 
Che  Examiner  does  not,  however,  state  what  portion  of  the 
prior  art  the  eleotrioal  artisan  would  make  use  of  in  ob- 

I  taininp  these  results.  She  Examiner  also  states  that  "it 
would  be  contrary  to  the  dictates  of  reason  to  use  motor 
and  battery  which  were  not  capable  of  taking  care  of  the 
temporary  overloads  and  adapted  to  work  together".  Appli¬ 
cant  1b  not  claiming  merely  motor  and  battery  capable  of 
taking  care  of  tho  temporary  overloads  and  adapted  to  work 
together,  but  is  claiming  a  combination  including  a  battery 
having  certain  defined  characteristics  and  a  motor  having 
certain  structural  features  adapting  it  especially  for  use 
with  the  battery  for  the  purpose  of  driving  a  member  trans¬ 
mitting  torque  varying  through  wide  limits.  The  eombinatior 
claimed  by  applicant  is  new  and  involves  a  marked  departure 
from  the  practice  usual  at  the  time  of  filing  this  applica¬ 
tion  in  battery  and  motor  design  for  electrically  driven 
vehicles. 

Tho  Examiner  calls  particular  attention  to  the 
I  data  of  certain  machines  described  by  Arnold  in  "Die  Gleigh- 
|  etrommaschine".  The  data  of  these  machines  havebeen  care¬ 
fully  considered.  Hone  of  these  machines  is  a  motor  for  pro¬ 
pelling  a  vehicle.  The  prior  practice  in  the  design  of  motors 
(2) 


for  vehiole  propulsion  wsb  to  make  tho  motor  as  oompaot  as 
possible,  to  use  a  relatively  large  number  of  colls  and 
high  voltage,  ana  to  provide  a  relatively  small  commutator, 
ana  it  is  to  the  praotice  in  designing  suoh  storage  battery 
motor  eetB  that  applioant  particularly  refers  in  oomparing 
his  improvements.  It  is  to  be  noted  that  the  statements 
in  applioant' s  communication  dated  February  3,  1915  regard¬ 
ing  the  partioular  example  of  a  motor  used  by  him  in  the 
embodiment  of  his  invention  does  not  form  a  part  of  the 
disclosure  of  the  application  but  is  merely  given  as  an 
example.  In  this  example,  it  is  stated  that  the  current 
density  is  about  45  amperes  per  square  inch  at  maximum  load, 
and  that  the  bfushes  used  were  of  a  speoial  kind  of  high 
conductive  metal  oarbon  rated  by  the  manufacturer  to  carry 
normally  100  amperes  per  square  inch.  The  brush  densities 
which  are  calculated  from  the  examples  given  in  Arnold  are 
for  normal  loads,  not  maximum  loads,  and  there  is  nothing 
to  show  that  anything  hut  ordinary  carbon  brushes  wo  re  used, 
and  presumably  at  that  time  ordinary  earbon  brushes  were 
used.  As  the  Examiner  is  no  doubt  aware,  various  improve¬ 
ments  havo  been  made  in  so-called  metal  earbon  or  graphite 
brushes  which  have  vastly  increased  the  carrying  oapaoity 
of  these  brushes.  The  comparison,  therefore,  of  applioant'i 
current  density  with  the  densities  employed  in  the  machines 
described  in  Arnold  is  not  a  fair  one,  inasmuch  as  there  is 
nothing  to  show  that  brushes  of  tho  same  conductivity  were 
employed  in  tho  two  instanoes,  and  furthermore,  as  stated 


(3) 


above.  these  machines  described  in  Arnold  aro  not  vehicle  | 
motors.  It  is.  of  course,  well  known  that  in  the  menu-  | 
faoture  of  small  motors,  brushes  of  a  size  Greater  than 
the  ordinary  practice  are  some  times  used  for  reasons  of 
commercial  expediency.  Shis  is  probably  the  case  in  the 
motor  described  on  page  147  of  Arnold  (Machine  Ho.  1). 

This  machine,  however,  is  used  to  drive  a  centrifugal  pump 
I  and  therefore  has  a  substantially  constant  load.  In  motors 
used  for  vehicle  propulsion,  the  load  varies  enormously. 

For  example ,  in  the  machine  mentioned  on  page  6  of  the  speo- 
ifioation  of  this  application,  a  current  density  of  75  am- 
pores  is  employed  when  runninc  on  tho  level,  and  this  cur-  | 
rent  may  rise  from  200  to  250  amperes  when  climbing  or  on  I 
bad  roadB. 

Claim  1  has  been  amended  to  point  out  more  defin- 
itely  that  the  rules  of  ordinary  desisn  referred  to  as  a 
standard  of  comparison  are  the  rules  of  design  for  vehicle 
motors. 

i  Claim  2  is  believed  to  be  patentable  in  its  pres- 

j  ent  form  for  reasons  heretofore  set  forth,  and  it  is  not 
seen  that  the  Examiner  is  relying  on  any  now  ground  of 
rejection  in  his  letter  of  March  0.  1916. 
i  Hew  claim  3  submitted  herewith  includes  the  feat¬ 

ures  of  claim  1  and  certain  additional  featuros.  namely, 
the  low  voltage  of  the  battery,  the  long  commutator,  and 
the  large  current  capaoity  of  the  field  coils. 


(4) 


IThe  Examiner's  real  pro  unci  of  rejection  is  appar¬ 
ently  lack  of  invention,  and  on  this  point  it  is  believed 
that  the  decision  of  the  Circuit  Court  of  Appeals,  Seventh 
Circuit,  in  Pieper  et  al.  vs.  3.S.  White  Dental  Ufg.  Co., 

228  ».  B.,  30,  is  of  interest,  in  this  decision  the  validity 
of  the  Pieper  motor  patent  Ho.  704,099  is  upheld,  and  in  the 
combination  claimed, the  relation  between  certain  eleotrioal 
features  of  the  windings,  namely,  the  self  induction  of  the 
armature  coils  and  the  self  induction  of  the  field  windings, 
are  of  great  importance,  just  ae  in  the  invention  now  under 
consideration  the  eleotrioal  features  of  the  comutator  and 
brush  contact  area,  low  internal  resistanco  of  motor  in 
both  field  and  armature  windings,  etc.,  are  of  importance. 

In  this  deoision  reference  is  made  to  Railroad  Supply  Co. 


vs.  Hart  Steel  Cc.,  222  P.  R..  261.  and  the  following  quo¬ 
tation  from  this  decision  is  believed  to  be  pertinent  to  the 
invention  under  oonsldoration:- 

"  Invent  ion  of  a  combination  does  not  lie  in 

§ Iffi  cHp 
2  •sot  ;r~  JS-i'sa- 

of  the  patent." 


(6) 


JSH 


Div. . 2.6  Eoom.^-lX>5 

itdJreM  mila 


OJJ)  Paper  No . ;;i0th)f 

application  should  give  ibe  «erlnl  number, 
name  of  the  applicant. 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 

UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 

WASHINGTON  . . .J5ar,~9-, --L91-6- 


.J’rsnk.L.....Hyfir.1 
_ _ Orange,.... 


Please  find  below  a  communication  from  the  EXAMINER  in  charge  of  the  application  of 

-r.  A  _  WfB.n,  rn  srt  ..4mr..ja^..x’91J-.-JoE-Storage.3at.te^-Atotar-SeA8^._ 
_ Ser.  Ho  .  64aTQ?a - - - - 


Commissioner  of  Patents.  (/ 


In  response  to  amendment  filed  3?eU  •  X9»  1916» 

Upon  reoonei  derat  ion  ,  the  claims  arc  a^ain  rejected  for 
the  reasons  of  record. 

X  The  applicant  has  taken  a  well  known  type  of  battery, 
expressly  designed  for  U3e  where  sudden  heavy  overloads  are  fre¬ 
quent,  and  particularly  for  driving  motors  on  vehicles,  and  has 
exercised  only  the  skill  to  be  expected  of  the  designer  1 n  build¬ 
ing  the  motor  to  work  vdth  the  battery.  Large  brush  contact  area 
and  low  internal  resistance  are,  as  shown  by  the  publications  of 
record,  used  for  low  voltage  machines,  and  if  the  applicant  has 
carries  his  design  to  an  extreme  in  these  respects,  it  differs 
only  in  degree,  not  in  kind.  ibrther,  it  is  again  noted  that  the 
description  nowhere  states  what  “ordinary  practioe"  is,  and  it  is 
therefore  difficult  to  determine  with  oertainty  what  will  or  will 
not  fall  within  the  scope  of  the  invention.  X 

Inasmuch  as  olaim  1 ,  as  amended,  and  claim  3  are  directed 
to  substantially  the  Bame  subject  matter  as  were  the  claimB  at  the 
time  of  the  last  Office  action,  and  bring  up  no  new  qu  est  i  o  ns ,  nor 
necessitate  the  oitation  of  new  references,  but  are  rejeoted  on  . 

the  same  ground,  this  action  is.  made  final  for  the  purpose  of  appeal, 
Applicant's  attention  is  directed  to  Commissioner's  Order 


Ser.  Ho.  642, 072.... a. 

Ho.  2210,  216  0.  G.  1,  in  accordance  with  which  no  amendment  that 
do 03  not  plaoe  this  case  in  condition  for  final  action  may  ho 
entered  herein  without  the  approval  of  a  Law  Examiner. 


Examiner  -  Division  26, 


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Kay  18,  1911. 


07'  HI  17,  011:3  TEST  IN  NO. 

WITH  16  A-8  KBIOON 


1  BEI.IVr.HY  V.7.90H  KQUI. 
CEILS . 


Course  used  for  test  was  Eagle  Hocl:  hill,  measuring  1  mile. 
One  half  hour  rests  allowed  after  each  test. 


Total 

Weight 

vverapo 

Volts 

Average 
Amps . 

Time  for 
Climb 

Temperature 

Kiso  of  Comm. 

1st  climb, 2310  lbs 

17.09 

155 

15.6  min. 

32.5  degrees  cont-igrodo 

2nd 

16.78 

152.5 

16.5  " 

35.5 

3d  . 

16.13 

153.23 

17.  " 

42. 

4th  " 

16;  72 

151.17 

17.5  " 

40.5  " 

6th  "  ”  " 

15.25 

153.33 

18. 

39.5  " 

6th  "  "  " 

14.73 

151.5 

19.5  " 

BO  .4  " 

7th  "  "  ’’ 

12.92 

156.34 

25.5  " 

65 

8th  Trent  Up  .1  of  a  nils  and  stalled,  could  run  along  on  level 
slowly. 

The  commutation  was  perfect  throughout  the  above  teat. 

Hoads  fair.  Batteries  fully  charged  at  first. 


i 


June  23,  1911 


The  present  practice  in  the  manufacture  of 
electrical  trucks  and  automobiles  is  to  use  a  relatively 
large  murker  of  cells  and  high  voltage,  ('or  instance, 
the  coci.'O  reial  voltages  now  usefl  range  from  40  to  50  in 
the  snail  electric  run-abouts  to  as  high  as  110  or  11c 
volts,  in  the  large  motor-driven  trucks. 

The  use  of  such  voltages  requires  a  compar¬ 
atively  large  number  of  battery  cells,  and  makes  the 
outfit  relatively  expensive  to  construct  and  maintain. 

Ouch  an  equipment  is  also  much  more  liable  to 
troubles  from  grounds  or  leakage  in  the  wiring,  batteries, 
or  motors,  than  would  be  the  case  if  <-  considerably  lower 
voltage  was  available-  or  practical  le. 

Vie  have  found  that  by  certain  modifications  in 
the  motor  construction  and  arrangement  of  cells  that  a 
much  lower  voltage  can  be  used  efficiently  for  the  above 
uur^ose,  thus  securing  a  relatively  inexpensive  equip¬ 
ment  and  all  the  advantages  of  a  low  voltage  at  the  battery 
and  motor. 

In  order  to  maintain  tho  same  horse-power  output 
in  an  exj-uiumont  of  any  given  si:e,  it  is,  of  course,  necessary 
that  the  current  input  to  the  motor  be  increased  in  uro portion 
as  t^e  voltage  decreases,  r’or  example  in  an  automobile 
requiring  one  kilo  watt  at  100  volts,  the  current  would  only 
bo  10  amperes.  If  the  voltage  were  reduced  to  10  volts  the 
current  inuut  would  be  increased  to  100  amperes,  hence 
the  necessity  of  certain  special  features  in  the  design  o. 
the  motor  to  satisfactorily  take  care  of  a  relatively  large 
amount  of  current. 


Using  20  volts  as  a  standard  we  have  found  that  the 
folio1, i  ing  nronorti  ons  in  motor  construction  give  the  most 
satisfactory  result  in  oractice.  inference  is  to  be  hua 
to  the  figure s  1  anti  2  herewith,  in  whi  ch  Jig.  1  shows  a 
'  side  elevation  and  section  of  a  motor  proportionec  as  stated. 
A  is  the  frame  of  the  motor  which  supports  the  laminated 
field  structure  1.  This  field  is  of  the  four  pole  type  and 
each  uole  is  wound  with  heavy  copper  strip.  The  armature 
C  is  of  the  ironclad  type  with  the  winding  imbeded  in  slots 
beneath  the  surface  of  the  core.  The  winding  itself  is  so 
arranged  that  not  more  than  one  turn  per  coil  Ox  wire  is 
used.  The  working  face  of  the commu tier  is  at  least  uwice 
the  length  of  the  face  of  the  armature.  ~  relatively  large 
number  of  carbon  brushes  are  used  to  commute  the  current  with 
the  least  uossible  loss  or  drop  in  voltage.  As  there  is  only 
one  turn  per  coil  in  ih  e  armature  the  voltage  between  the 


segments  of  the  commutator  is  reduced  to  t.  ve^-y  small 
amount  in  a  30  volt  winding,  therefore,  there  is  no 
tendency  whatever  to  spark  or  flash  under  heavy  loads. 


Actual  service  con': 

vehicle  having  a  normal  load  current  of  say  75  amnerea" 
on  the  level,  running  at  a  given  sooed  im.y  require  200  to 
250  amperes  when  climbing  steep  grades  or  on  bad  roads. 
Under  these  conditions  the  usual  dasign  of  motor  with  a 
relatively  small  commutator  ,nS  light  winding  in  the 
armature  and  field  will  invariably  break  down  or  burn  out. 
a  mouor  constructed  as  specified  herewith  will  stand  those 
extreme  conditions  of  overload  without  any  difficulty 
whatever. 


Owing  to  the  low  voltage  ui 
exposed  to  water  and  extreme  weather 
damage  whatever,  and  such  a  motor  i 
continuous  use  in  unskilled  hands. 


!d  a  motor  may  be 
ionditions  without  any 
well  adapted  for 


Tie  number  of  connections  between  the  cells 
requiring  attention  is  greatly  reduced,  if  or  instance 
the  60  coll  equipment  which  is  frequently  used  at  the 
present  time  has  over  120  separate  connections  at  the 
battery,  while  a  16  cell  equipment  delivering  20  volts 
as  outlined  above  has  only  52  connections  to"look 
after . 


Owing  to  the  low  voltage  used  in  this  sy-ster 
it  is  not  ne cossary  that  the  motor  be  made  comnletely 
waterproof;  it  may  bo  left  relativel  oien  so  that  active 
and  free  ventilation  on  .11  parts  of  the  winding  and  the 
commutator  is  assured.  Shis  is  a  valuable  feature  when 
the  motor  is  subjected  to  heavy  and  continuous  overload, 
for  in  such  :  case  the  completely  enclosed  motor  would 
be  liable  to  damage  from  overheating  while  the  onon  motor 
would  bo  uninjured. 


July  31,  1911; 


Mr.  Dyer:- 

I  hand  you  herewith  a  speoifioation  intended  to 
oover  Mr.  Edison's  invention  of  a  low  cost  storage  battery 
and  motor  outfit  for  vehicles.  I  have  carefully  considered 
your  suggestion  to  prepare  diagrams  comparing  the  design  and 
characteristics  of  this  motor  with  those  of  motors  of  stand¬ 
ard  design,  but  have  not  been  able  to  evolve  any  suoh  dia¬ 
grams  of  a  satisfactory  kind.  I  am  sure  you  fully  realise 
the  difficulty  of  drawing  claims  to  oover  an  invention  of 
this  ohnraoter. 

HI-JS 


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This  application  relates  to  the  use  with  a  battery  of 
the  Edison  type  of  a  series  electric  motor  of  low  internal  resist¬ 
ance  having  a  long  commutator  and  large  brush  and  commutator  con¬ 


tact  area.  The  claims  read  as  follows 


1.  In  apparatus  for  the  propulsion  of  an  eleotrio 
vehicle,  the  combination  of  a  driven  member  required  to  transmit 
torque  varying  through  wide  limits,  a  series  eleotrio  motor  opera¬ 
tively  oonneoted  to  said  member  for  driving  the  same,  and  a  stor¬ 
age  battery  for  supplying  current  to  the  motor  capable  of 
discharging  at  a  rate  in  excess  of  normal,  necessary  and 
suffioient  to  operate  the  motor  to  cause  the  driven  member 

to  transmit  the  maximum  torque  required,  said  motor  having 
low  internal  resistance  in  both  field  and  armature  windings 
and  having  brush  and  commutator  contact  area  at  least  twice  as 
great  as  required  by  the  rules  of  ordinary  design  for  vehicle 
motors ,  substantially  as  described. 

2.  in  apparatus  of  the  class  desoribed,  the  combin¬ 
ation  of  a  driven  member  required  to  transmit  torque  vary¬ 
ing  through  wide  limits,  a  series  eleotrio  motor  operatively 
oonneoted  to  said  member  for  driving  the  same,  and  a  stor¬ 
age  battery  for  supplying  current  to  the  motor  capable  of 
discharging  at  a  rate  in  excess  of  normal,  necessary  and 
suffioient  to  operate  the  motor  to  cause  the  driven  member 

to  transmit  the  maximum  torque  required,  said  motor  having 
low  internal  resistance  and  having  brush  and  commutator  con¬ 
tact  area  sufficiently  great  to  substantially  eliminate  sparking 
even  when  the  motor  is  supplied  with  current  at  the  aforesaid 
excessive  rate,  substantially  as  described. 


3.  In  a  storage  battery  motor  set  for  the  pro¬ 
pulsion  of  an  eleotrio  vehicle,  the  combination  of  a  driven 
member  adapted  to  transmit  torque  varying  through  wide  lim¬ 
its,  a  series  eleotrio  motor  of  low  internal  resistance 
operatively  connected  to  said  member  for  driving  the  same, 
and  a  low  voltage  storage  battery  for  supplying  current  to 
the  motor  capable  of  discharging  at  a  rate  in  excess  of 
normal,  necessary. land  sufficient  to  operate  the  motor  to 
cause  the  driven  member'  to  transmit  the  maximum  torque  re¬ 
quired,  said  motor  having  its  commutator  length  equal  to  or 
greater  than  its  armature  length  and  having  its  field  coils 
of  at  least  twice  the  current  carrying  capacity  and  its 
brush  and  commutator  contact  area  it  least  twice  as  great 
as  is  required  by  the  rules  of  ordinary  design  for  vehicle 
motors,  substantially  as  desoribed. 


-2- 


These  claims  have  been  finally  rejected,  the  position 
of  the  Examiner  being  stated  as  follows:- 

pisimiilP 

whJ+hnr’ is  again  noted  that  the  description  nowhere  states 
what  "ordinary  practice"  is,  and  it  is  the?ef™e  difficult  to 

Sfjss  rti1 »'  »*  mi  sss 

The  prior  art  shows  dynamo  electric  maohines  having  low 
internal  resistance,  long  commutators,  and  large  brush  contact 
areas  with  resulting  low  current  densities  at  the  brushes.  we 
have  presented  the  arguments  for  the  allowance  of  the  claims  as 
strongly  as  possible,  but  have  been  unable  to  persuade  the  Exam¬ 
iner  that  there  is  anything  patentable  in  the  case.  The  question 
now  is  whether  you  wish  an  appeal  taken  to  the  Board  of  Examine rs- 
in-Chief.  X  do  not  believe  that  such  an  appeal  would  be  success- 


The  claims  as  now  presented  cover  the  combination  of  a 
storage  battery  with  a  motor  having  certain  characteristics.  when, 
the  case  was  filed  it  contained  claims  for  a  motor.  See  original 
claims  4  and  5.  These  claims  were  divided  out  in  compliance  with 
an  Office  requirement.  X  do  not  believe  there  is  patentable  sub¬ 
ject  matter  in  the  motor  jar  se  as  disclosed  in  this  application. 


-3- 


The  only  limitations  we  could  put  in  claims  in  this  application 
to  cover  the  motor  would  relate  to  the  abnormally  extended  area 
of  brush  contaot  with  the  commutator,  length  of  the  commutator 
the  same  or  greater  than  the  armature,  or  commutator  twice  as  long 
as  the  armature,  and  abnormally  low  field  resistance.  The  Exami¬ 
ner  has  already  substantially  held  that  these  features  are  merely 
a  question  of  design  and  not  patentable.  please  also  let  us  have 
your  decision  as  to  whether  you  wish  such  a  divisional  application 


filed. 

HI- JS 


tic 


Vw/y,  M  ,*  — • 

(j: 


\  AU,  Ci U',1 


F  772 


u 


Patent  Series 


Patent  Application  Files 


Folio  #  773  Sound  Records  and  Process  and  Apparatus  for  Making 
Same 

Serial  #:  642377 

Primary  Applicant:  Edison,  Thomas  A 
Date-Executed:  8/1/1911 


<Petttton. 


®o  tfjc  Commissioner  of  patents : 

gour  petitioner  jhomas  a.  Edison 
a  citijcn  of  tfjc  fHniteb  States,  resibing  anb  Jjabing  a  $)oSt  (Office  abbress  at 


llewellyn  Park,  V/est  Orange,  EsBe.it  County,  How  Jersey 


praps  tfjat  letters  patent  map  be  granteb  to  fjtm  for  tlje  improvements  in 


SOUND  RECORDS  AMD  PROCESS  AND  APPARATUS  POR  MAKING  SAME 


Set  fortfj  in  tfje  annexeb  Specification ;  anb  fje  fjerebp  appoints  Jfranb  X.  ©per 
(Registration  J?o.  560),  of  ©range,  JJetu  bis  attornep,  toitfj  full 

potoer  of  substitution  anb  rebocation,  to  prosecute  tijis  application,  to  make 
alterations  anb  atnenbments  tfjerein,  to  receibe  tlje  patent,  anb  to  transact  all 
business  tit  tlje  patent  ©ffice  connected  tfjeretoitlj. 


I  I  specification 

TO  All  WHOM  IT  MAY  CONCERN 

BE  IT  KNOWN,  that  I,  THOMAS  A.  EDISON,  a  citizen 
of  the  United  States  and  a  resident  of  Llewellyn  Parle,  West 
Orange,  Essex  County,  New  Jorsey.  have  invented  oertain  ne* 
and  useful  improvements  in  SOUND  RECORDS  AND  PROCESS  AND 
APPARATUS  FOR  MAKING  SAME,  of  whioh  the  following  is  a 
description: - 

My  invention  relates  to  an  improved  sound  record, 
preferably  of  that  type  whioh  oonsists  of  a  base  or  baolc- 
ing  of  one  material,  usually  a  molded  material,  and  an 
outer  surfaoe  veneer  or  oovering  of  another  material,  whiob 

Ireoeives  the  sound  reoord,  and  also  to  an  improved  process 
and  apparatus  for  malting  the  reoord.  The  principal  objeot 
of  my  invention  is  to  produoe  in  a  quiok  and  efficient 
manner  an  improved  sound  reoord  whioh  will  be  strong  and 
durable  and  have  no  air  bubbles  or  other  imperfeotions  in 
the  reoord  surfaoe,  and  which  will  permit  a  large  number  oi 
reproductions  without  sensible  wear.  In  aooordanoe  with 
this  objeot,  I  apply 'the  outer  surfaoe  veneer  in  a  plural¬ 
ity  of  exceedingly  thin  layers  to  the  base  or  baching, 
thereby  obtaining  a  reoord  surfaoe  of  a  high  degree  of 
homogeneity  and  perfection.  Other  objeots  of  my  inven¬ 
tion  will  appear  more  fully  in  the  following  speoifioation 
and  appended  claims. 

I  prefer  to  employ  for  the  outer  sound  reoord 
surfaoe  or  veneer  a  hard  solid  material,  preferably  a 


(1) 


resinous  body  like  shellao,  whioh  is  solid  at  ordinary 
temperatures.  As  a  suitable  material  for  tbe  base  or 
booking  of  my  improved  reoord,  X  prefer  to  use  Montan  wax; 
impregnated  with  about  7$  of  ootton  flook  or  other  fibrous  \ 
material.  By  the  use  of  this  fibrous  material  with  the' 
Montan  wax,  X  seoure  a  high  degree  of  durability  for  the 
base,  the  fibrous  material  being  completely  penetrated. and 
enolosed  by  tho  wax -like  material,  and  at  the  same  time 
controlling  in  a  degree  the  expansion  and  oontraotion  of 
the  base.  If  desired,  inert  powders  may  be  mixed  with  the 
Montan  wax  and  flook  to  further  control  the  expansion  and 
oontraotion.  A  reoord  made  of  tho  speoifio  compositions 
mentioned  above  has  substantially  the  same  ooeffioient  of 
expansion  for  the  backing  and  the  surfaoe  veneer,  so  that 
there  is  no  danger  of  the  reoord  beooming  oraoked  under 
ohanges  of  temperature.  Suoh  a  reoord  is  also  very  dur¬ 
able  and  may  be  subjected  to  comparatively  rough  treatment 
without  any  objectionable  injury.  While,  however,  I  pre¬ 
fer  to  use  the  speoifio  compositions  mentioned,  my  inven¬ 
tion  is  not  limited  thereto ,  and  various  other  materials 
or  compositions  may  be  used. 

In  making  a  reoord  having  a  surfaoe  veneer  or 
oovering  of  shellao,  the  shellao  is  dissolved  in  aloohol  or 
any  other  suitable  solvent,  and  the  solution  obtained  is 
applied  in  a  plurality  of  exceedingly  thin  layers  to  the 
base  or  baoking.  I  then  preferably  mount  the  backing 
upon  a  rotating  mandrel  or  other  suitable  support  and  ap¬ 
ply  the  solution  thereto  by  means  of  a  bruBh  of  oamel's 
hair,  or  in  any  other,  suitable  way.  It  is  understood, 


(2) 


of  oourse,  that  eaoh  layer  is  permitted  to  dry  before  the 
next  layer  is  superposed  thereon.  After  a  sufficient  num¬ 
ber  of  layers  of  the  shellac  solution  have  been  ooated  on 
the  blank,  the  latter  is  plaood  in  a  room  or  oven  heated 
to  a  suitable  temperature  for  expelling  the  excess  of  sol¬ 
vent  to  permit  the  rooord  to  harden  upon  cooling.  I 
a  suitable 

have  found  that  if  five  or  six  layers  of  the  shellac  solu¬ 
tion  are  ooated  upon  the  baoking,  that  the  reoora  tablet 
may  be  hardened  by  placing  the  same  in  a  room  hoatea  to 
ijbout  120°  F.  for  about  four  hours.  The  tablet  with  the 
hardened  surfaoe  veneer  is  provided  with  the  record  im¬ 
pression  in  the  manner  hereinafter  described  or  by  any 
other  suitable  process.  By  applying  the  surfaoe  coating 
in  a  number  of  thin  layers  as  described  above,  the  ooating 
or  veneer  not  only  has  a  more  even  texture,  but  may  also 
be  dried  and  hardened  upon  the  baoking  in  but  a  small  frac¬ 
tion  of  the  time  it  would  take  to  ary  ana  harden  the  same 
if  it  all  were  applied  as  one  layer,  the  formation  of  air 
bubbles  whioh  is  unavoidable  when  the  surfaoe  is  applied 
as  a  single  layer  also  being  prevented. 

In  order  that  my  invention  may  be  more  clearly 
understood,  attention  is  hereby  directed  to  the  accompany¬ 
ing  drawings,  forming  part  of  this  specification,  and  il¬ 
lustrating  certain  preferred  forms  of  apparatus  for  making 
my  improved  record. 

In  the  drawings,  Figure  1  represents  a  plan  view 
of  a  support  for  the  reoord  tablets  or  backings; 

Figure  2  represents  a  side  elevation,  partly  in 
section,  taken  on  the  line  2-2  of  Figure  1; 

Figure  3  represents  a  front  elevation  of  a  modi¬ 
fied  form  of  supporting  means  for  the  tablet  or  baoking; 


I  Figure  4  is  a  oentral  vertioal  seotional  view  of 

a  suitable  devioe  for  forming  the  reoord  impression  in  the 
surfaoe  oovering  or  veneer,  some  of  the  partB  being  shown 
in  elevation. 

In  all  the  views,  like  parts  are  designated  by 

Ithe  same  referenoe  oharaoters. 

Referring  to  the  drawings,  the  numeral  1  repre¬ 
sents  a  suitable  frame  or  support  provided  with  a  plural¬ 
ity  of  reoesses  Z  open  at  one  end  and  adapted  to  reoeive 
and  hold  in  proper  position  a  plurality  of  racks  3,  eaoh 
provided  with  a  vertioal  lateral  flange  4  in  whioh  a  plur- 

!ality  of  reoord  supports  5  are  rotatably  mounted.  Seoured 
to  eaoh  of  these  supports  5  is  a  pulley  <5  adapted  to  be 
rotated  by  a  oord  or  belt  7  whioh  is  engaged  over  the 

!!  pulleys  8.  and  9  rotatably  mounted  in  opposite  ends  of 
the  flange  4,  the  pulley  9  being  preferably  mounted  in  a 
vertioal  ear  or  projection  4'  on  said  flange  as  shown.  In 
order  to  provide  a  large  aro  of  oontaot  between  the  oord  or 
belt  7  and  the  pulley  j6 ,  and  thereby  insure  the  effioiont 
I!  driving  of  the  latter,  idle  pulleys  10  are  provided.  Thes 
I  pulleys  engage  the  oord  or  belt  7_  on  opposite  sideB  of  the 
pulleys  6.,  the  pulley  6!  taking  the  plaoe  of  one  of  the  end 
idlers.  The  pulley  £  is  rigidly  oonr.ooted  with  and  ro¬ 
tated  by  a  gear  wheel  or  other  suitable  driving  mean3  11 
I  adapted  to  detaohably  engage  a  pinion  12  seoured  to  the 
shaft  13,  whioh  is  rotatably  mounted  in  the  standards  14 
on  the  base  1,  and  is  driven  in  any  suitable  way.  Referr¬ 
ing  to  Figure  1,  it  will  be  seen  that  a  gear  12  iB  pro¬ 
vided  on  the  shaft  13  for  eaoh  of  the  raoks  3.  It  will 
also  be  seen  that  the  driving  moans  11  and  12  are  auto- 


(4) 


mat! o ally  connected  and  disconnected  when  the  racks  3  are 
slid  or  otherwise  inserted  in  plaoe  in  the  reoesses  or 
|  grooves  2  and  removed  therefrom. 

In  using  the  reoord  support  described  above,  a 
j  base  or  backing  is  mounted  upon  oaoh  support  5,  and  the 
I  desired  number  of  racks  3  placed  in  position  in  the  reoess- 
|  es  2  of  the  base  1,  the  gears  11  of  the  various  raoks 
j  being  automatically  engaged  with  the  pinions  12  by  thiB 
|  operation,  so  that  all  of  the  backings  are  placed  in  ro¬ 
il  tation  by  the  rotation  of  shaft  13.  A  bfush,  such  as  that 
|  ehown  at  15',  is  then  dipped  into  a  solution  of  the  material 
Jj  of  the  surfaoe  covering  or  veneer,  and  this  solution  is 
I  applied  to  the  various  backings,  beginning  with  the  first 
j  haoking  on  one  raok,  finishing  this  raok,  then  ooating  the 
||  baokings  on  the  next,  and  the  various  following  raoks  in 
order  until  a  suitable  number  of  baokings  have  been  ooated. 

I  The  number  of  raoks  may  be  so  ohosen  that  the  tablets  first 
ooated  will  be  dry  and  ready  for  another  ooating  as  soon 

ias  eaoh  ooating  has  been  applied  to  all  of  the  tablets. 

A  sufficient  number  of  layers  or  coatings  are  applied  in 
this  way  until  the  veneer  has  the  desired  thickness.  The 
thiokness  of  the  solution  applied  may  obviously  bo  regulat- 

Ied  at  will,  but  it  is  preferable  to  have  the  some  rather 
thin  so  as  to  obviate  the  production  of  imperfections  in 
the  surfaoe  ooating. 

After  the  surfaoe  veneer  or  ooating  has  been  ap¬ 
plied,  the  raoks  3  are  detaohed  from  the  base  1  and  placed 
into  a  suitably  heated  room  or  oven,  where  the  exoess  amoun 


(5) 


of  solvent  for  the  surfaoe  material  is  driven  off,  aB  here¬ 
inbefore  described,  so  as  to.plaoe  the  record  in  condition 
for  hardening  upon  cooling  to  normal  temperatures. 

The  blanks  formed  as  described  above  may  be 
provided  with  the  record  impression  in  any  suitable  way, 
Figure  4  illustrating  a  convenient  form  of  apparatus  for 
performing  this  operation.  In  this  figure,  16  represents 
a  suitable  mold  having  the  matrix  17  formed  on  the  inner 
surfaoe  thereof.  A  oore  18  provided  with  a  oentral  pass¬ 
age  19  and  a  transverse  passage  20  extending  aoross  the 
core  and  oommunioating  with  the  passage  19,  has  a  jaoket 
or  envelope  21  of  rubber  or  other  elastio  material  plaoed 
upon  the  same,  this  envelope  being  seo\ired  to  the  oore  by 
means  of  the  inturned  ends  thereof.  The  outer  end  of 
the  mold  is  alosed  by  a  member  22,  whioh  may  be  seoured  in 
position  against  the  upper  end  of  the  jaoket  by  means  of 
a  taper  key  23,  whioh  may  be  forced  in  position  in  a  slot 
in  the  neok  24  of  the  oore  18,  so  as  to  force  the  oore  and 
the  member  22  into  looking  engagement.  A  jaoket  25  or 
other  suitable  means  is  plaoed  around  the  matrix,  so  as  to 
heat  or  cool  the  same  as  desired. 

In  forming  the  reoord  impression  in  the  blank, 
formed  as  desoribod  above,  the  blank,  preferably  in  a  some 
what  plastio  condition,  is  plaoed  on  the  outside  of  the 
rubber  envelope  21,  and  the  mold  16  plaoed  in  position  on 
the  outside  of  the  blank.  The  upper  end  of  the  mold  is 
then  dosed  by  the  member  22,  whioh  is  looked  in  position 
by  the  key  23,  and  fluid  under  pressure  is  admitted  to  the 
interior  of  the  rubber  jaoket  21  through  the  openings  19 


(6) 


and  20.  After  the  application  of  sufficient  pressure,  the 
latter  is  shut  off,  ana  the  finished  record  removed  from 
the  apparatus.  In  order  to  shrink  the  record  from  the 
matrix,  a  suitable  oooling  fluid  may  be  passed  throxigh  the 
jacket  2E5. 

In  Figure  3  I  have  illustrated  a  tablet  support 
adapted  to  be  used  in  a  modified  process.  Shis  support 
oomprises  a  single  mandrel  27  seoxired  to  a  shaft  26  rotat- 
jl  ably  mounted  in  a  bearing  or  support  29,  and  having  secured 
at  its  end  opposite  that  supporting  the  mandrel  a  pulley 
j  so  adapted  to  be  driven  from  any  suitable  driving  means, 
j  ejector  comprising  a  bell  crank  lever  31  pivoted  to  the 
|  support  29, /T slide  32  pivoted  at  one  end  to  the  upper  arm 
|  of  the  lever  31  and  provided  with  a  slot  33  whereby  it  is 
slidably  mounted  on  the  guide  or  button  84,  is  provided  to 
conveniently  loosen  tho  tablets  from  the  mandrel  27.  ?he 
slide  32  has  an  up-turned  flange  35  at  the  end  adjaoent  the 
tablet,  this  flange  being  adapted  to  engage  the  adjaoent  end 
of  the  tablet  and  shift  the  latter  longitudinally  of  the 
mandrel  27  when  the  outer  end  of  the  horizontal  arm  of  the 
lever  31  is  depressed.  A  tension  spring  36  secured  at  one 

I  end  to  the  support  29  and  at  the  other  end  to  the  slide  32 
is  provided  to  retract  the  slide  32,  and  to  place  the  eject¬ 
or  in  inoperative  position  when  the  ejecting  foroe  is  re¬ 
moved  from  the  outer  end  of  the  horizontal  arm  of  the  lever 
31. 

In  employing  the  devioe  disclosed  in  Figure  3, 
the  baokings  or  bases  for  the  records  are  supported  upon 


(7) 


raofcs  in  a  suitable  number  of  trays  and  applied  consecu¬ 
tively  to  the  numdrol  or  support  27,  a  fine  ooating  being 
applied  to  oaoh  tablet  while  the  same  is  supported  on  the 
mandrel  27,  preferably  by  a  bruBh  15"  extending  the  width 
.  of  the  tablet,  as  shown  in  i'igure  3.  fhio  brush  should  . 
bo  given  a  slight  lateral  back  and  forth  movement  to  pre¬ 
vent  the  layer  of  surfaoe  material  applied  from  baooming 
ji  streaky.  The  trays  may  be  supported  upon  a  carriage 
|  mounted  upon  traoks,  so  that  they  may  be  ocnveniemtly 
jj  moved  along  past  the  support  on  v/hioh  the  tablets  are 
!|  ooated.  After  eaoh  of  the  baokir.gs  has  been  coated,  a 
j  seoond  ooating  is  applied,  and  the  operation  is  repeated 
1  until  the  proper  thickness  of  surfaoe  material  is  attained 

(After  this,  the  trays  supporting  tho  reoord  blanks  may  be 
plaood  in  a  heated  room  to  drivo  off  tho  excess  of  'solvent 
in  tho  surfaoe  material.  Tho  reoord  impression  may  be 

i 

formed  in  the  Burfaoe  veneer  or  ooating  in  tho  manner  here 
I  inbefore  described,  or  in  any  other  suitable  way. 

It  is  to  be  understood  that  my  invention  iB  not 
limited  to  the  exact  details  hereinbefore  sot  forth,  but 
J  is  as  broad  as  indioated  by  the  terms,  of  ~he  appended 

I  claims. 

Having  now  desoribed  my  invention,  what  I  olaim 
as  new  and  desire  to  proteot  by  letters  Patent  of  the 
United  States  is  as  follows 


(8) 


■I 


I  if  ,  '  A  bound  record  oomposed  of  a  base  and  a  surfaoe 

I  venaeAof  record  material  applied  in  a  plurality  of  thin 
jj  superposed  layers,  substantially  as  described. 

j  2.  \  A  sound  reoord  composed  of  a  base  and  a  surfaoe 

venoer  of\a  hard  resin  applied  in  a  plurality  of  thin 
|  superposem  layers ,  substantially  as  described. 

iZ.  A  sound  reoord  composed  of  a  base  and  a  surfaoe 
veneer  of  sAellao  applied  in  a  plurality  of  thin  super- 
i|  posed  layers\  substantially  as  described. 

I  4,  a  sound  reoord  oomposed  of  a  base  and  a  surfaoe 

veneer  of  a  haid  resin  applied  in  a  plurality  of  thin 
superposed  layeVs,  said  base  being  oomposed  of  a  material 
having  substantially  the  same  coefficient  of  expansion  as 
the  material  of  the  said  surfaoe  veneer,  substantially  as 
l  described.  \ 

jj  5.  A  sound  Aoord  oomposed  of  a  hard  wax -like  base  ^ 

and  a  surfaoe  veneei  of  a  hard  resin  applied  in  a  plurality 
of  thin  superposed  Ayers,  substantially  as  desoribed. 

I  6.  A  sound  reoorcl  oomposed  of  a  hard  wax -like  base 

impregnated  with  fibrods  material,  and  a  surfaoe  veneer 
jj  of  a  hard  resin  appliedUn  a  plurality  of  thin  superposed 
I  layers,  substantially  as\ desoribed. 

17.  A  sound  reoord  \omposed  of  a  hard  wax -like  base 
impregnated  with  fibrous  material,  and  a  surfaoe  veneer  of 
a  hard  resin  applied  in  a  plurality  of  thin  superposed 
layers,  the  material  of  whify  said  base  is  oomposed  having 


(9) 


test antially  the  same  ooeffioiont  of  expansion  as  the 
i\erlal  of  said  surfaoe  veneer,  substantially  as  described^ 

A  sound  reoord  oomposed  of  a  hard  wax-like  base 
impregnated  with  fibrous  material,  and  a  surfaoe  veneer  of 
shelJo  applied  in  a.  plurality  of  thin  superposed  layers, 
the  material  of  whioh  said  base  is  composed  having  sub¬ 
stantially  the  same  ooeffioient  of  expansion  as  the  ma¬ 
terial  Off  said  surfaoe  veneer,  substantially  as  described. 

\fhe  method  of  making  reoord  tablets  whioh  con¬ 
sists  in  boating  a  base  or  baoking  with  a  plurality  of 
thin  superposed  layers  of  record  material,  substantially 
as  set  fortjj.. 

lethod-  of  making  reoord  tablets  whioh  con- 
Bists  in  forming  a  base  or  baoking,  and  ooating  the  same 
with  a  plurality  of  thin  superposed  layers  of  a  hard  resin, 
substantially  ap  set  forth, 

11.  The  nbthod  of  making  reoord  tablets,  whioh  con¬ 
sists  in  forming  \a  base  or  baoking  of  hard  wax-like  mater¬ 
ial,  and  ooating  Ve  said  base  or  baoking  with  a  plurality 
|  of  thin  8uperposed\layers  of  a  hard  resin,  substantially 
as  set  forth 

The  method  of  making  reoord  tablets,  whioh  con¬ 
sists  in  forming  a  bafto  or  baoking  of  hard  wax-like  mater¬ 
ial  impregnated  with  fibrous  material,  and  ooating  the  saidj 
base  or  baoking  with  a  plurality  of  thin  superposed  layers 
of  a  hard  resin,  substantially  as  set  forth. 


(10) 


¥*• 


t  u(  U  C{  t/io/i  i*' 

The  method  of  making  reoord  tablets ,  whioh  oon- 


slsts  in  ooating  a  base  or  baoking  with  a  plurality  of  thin 
superposed  layers  of  a  reoord.  material,  causing  the  ooating 
to  dry  and  harden,  and  finally  forming  the  reoord  impress¬ 
ion  in  said  ooating,  substantially  as  set  forth. 

Whe  method  of  making  reoord  tablets,  whioh  con¬ 
sists  in  applying  to  a  base  or  baoking  a  plurality  of  thin 
ooatings  of  fe  solution  of  reoord  material,  end  expelling 
the  solvent  Vo  cause  the  ooated  base  or  baoking  to  harden, 
substantially ^s  set  forth. 

The  \pethod  of  making  reoord  tablets,  whioh  con¬ 
sists  in  applying  to  a  base  or  haoking  a  plurality  of  thin 
ooatings  of  a  soiWtion  of  reoord  material,  allowing  eaoh 
ooating  to  dry  before  the  applioation  of  the  next,  causing 
the  ooated  base  orYbaoking  to  harden,  and  finally  forming i 
the  reoord  impressi\n  in  the  surface  ooating,  substantially.) 
as  set  forth. 


In  a  devioe  of  the  olass  aesoribed,  the  oombina- 
‘i  jtion  of  a  plurality  of  rotatable  tablet  supports,  a  plur¬ 
ality  of  independently  portable  bearings  therefor,  rotat¬ 
able  driving  means,  and  means  whereby  the  rotation  of  said 
driving  means  may  bb  imparted  to  said  tablet  supports, 

.  substantially  as  aesoribed. 


HU  m  a  devioe  of  the  class  described ,  the  oombina 
tion  of  a  base,  rotatable  driving  means  thereon,  a  plural¬ 
ity  of  independently  portable  frameB  adapted  to  be  support 


(11) 


ed  on  said  base,  and  provided  with  rotatable  tablet  supports, 
and  means  whereby  the  rotation  of  said  driving  moans  may  bd 
imparted  to  said  tablet  supports,  substantially  as  de¬ 
scribed. 

In  a  devioe  of  the  olass  desoribed,  the  combina¬ 
tion  of  a  base,  rotatable  driving  means  thereon,  a  plural¬ 
ity  of  independently  portable  frames  adapted  to  We  support¬ 
ed  on  said  base,  and  provided  with  rotatable  taolet  sup¬ 
ports,  and  means  whereby  the  rotation  of  said  driving  means 
may  be  imparted  to  said  tablet  supports,  said  base  being 
provided  with. means  whereby  said  frames  may  be  positioned 
so  as  to  operatively  oonneot  said  last  named  means  to  said 
driving  means,  substantially  as  desorioed. 

I  I  3$//  In  a  devioe  of  the  olass  desoribed,  the  combina¬ 

tion  with  a  base,  rotatable  driving  means  thereon,  a -plur¬ 
ality  of  independently  portable  frames  adapted  to  be  sup¬ 
ported  on  said  base,  and  each  provided  with  a  plurality  of 
record  supports,  means  supported  by  said  frames  and  engage - 
able  with  or  disongageable. from  said  driving  means  by  di¬ 
rect  bodily  movement  of  said  frames,  whereby  the  rotation 
of  said  driving  means  may  be  imparted  to  said  record  sup¬ 
ports,  substantially  as  desoribed. 

In  a  device  of  the  olass  desoribed,  the  combina¬ 
tion  with  a  base,  rotatable  driving  meanB  thereon,  a  plur¬ 
ality  of  independently  portable  frames  adapted  to  be  sup¬ 
ported  on  said  base,  and  each  provided  with  a  plurality  of 
reoord  supports,  means  supported  by  said  frames  and  engage - 
able  with  or  disengageable  from  said  driving  means  by  di- 
reot  bodily  movement  of  Baid  frames,  whereby  the  rotation 
of  said  driving  means  may  be  imparted  to  Baid  reoord  sup¬ 
ports,  said  base  being  provided  with  means  whereby  said 


frames  may  too  positioned  in  operative  position  relatively 
to  said  driving  means,  sntostantially  as  desoritoed. 

JL.r/  a  -  l  - 


■ 


specification  digneb  anti  toitneddeb  tfjid  bap 
OTitnedded: 

\  J/uaLu^if  £}<&' 


..jdLrW.OrJ.  A3^±±^L- 


2  ^f? _ J<^JbuAsu^. 


©atb« 


g>tate  of  JBteU)  f  erdep  ] 
Countp  of  €ddcx  ! 


THOMAS  a.  bdisoh  .  tfjc  abobe  namcb 
petitioner,  being  bulp  dtuorn,  bepoded  anb  dapd  tijat  ije  id  a  citizen  of  tlje  XHniteb 
Stated,  anb  a  redibent  Of  Llewellyn  Park,  West  Orange,  Essex  Count  y, 


ITew  Jersey 


tfjat  Ije  berilp  beliebed  Ijimdelf  to  be  tije  original,  firdt  anb  dole  inbentor  of  tlje 
improbementd  in 

SOUIJI)  RECORDS  AIID  PROCESS  AMD  APPARATUS  PCR  14AXIHG  SAME 

bedcribeb  anb  claimeb  in  tlje  annexeb  dpecification;  that  Ije  boed  not  Imoto  anb 
boed  not  beliebe  tijat  tlje  dame  toad  eber  fenoton  or  udeb  before  ijid  inbention  or 
bidcoberp  tijereof;  or  patenteb  or  bedcribeb  in  anp  printeb  publication  in  tlje 
tHniteb  stated  of  America  or  anp  foreign  countrp  before  ijid  inbention  or 
bidcoberp  tijereof,  or  more  tljan  ttoo  peard  prior  to  tljid  application;  or  patenteb 
in  anp  countrp  foreign  to  tlje  Uniteb  stated  on  an  application  Web  more  Wan 
ttoelbe  montljd  prior  to  tfjid  application;  or  in  public  ude  or  on  dale  m  tlje 
Uniteb  stated  for  more  tljan  ttoo  peard  prior  to  tljid  application ;  anb  tijat  no 
application  for  patent  upon  daib  inbention  fjad  been  fileb  bp  Ijim  or  Ijid  legal 
repredentatibed  or  addignd  in  anp  foreign  countrp. 

gjtoorti  to  anb  dubderibeb  before  me  tljid  bap  of 


j&otarp  public. 


[gseall 


. .  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 

UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE^  ^  _ 

WASHINGTON 

Thonas  A.  Edison, 

Cara  '■'.'•:.nV:  I..  Dyer,  “ 

Jersey  . 


Please  find  below  a  mmmuiuaatUm  from,  the  EXAMINER  in  charge  of  your  application. 

for  Round  pm-iovds  and  vrocoss  r ’d  Appcvntue  for  Waking 
filed  4, 1911, serial  r.’i.n’.T'rr  (MS, 377  . 


Commissioner  of  Patent*. 


Claims  1  '.o  0  iticluairn  are  drawn  to  n  sound  record. 

Claims  9  to  Hi  inclusive  arc  drawn  to  the  method  of  Hairing 

Cl. .ins  lii  to  20  inclusive  nr8  dru«n  to  a  melding  apparatus. 
Division  is  roqulrod  hotwcon  fckass  several  grout'd  according 
t.h.o  provisions  of  rule  42'  and  t ho  title  of  this  Invention 
should  hy  o  o  r  r  e op o n d :l ngl y  limited  to  conform  with  the  scope  of 
the  claims. 

ix  nakiKjpdducaxx  -In  amending  this  case, applicant 
should  consult  the  following  references: 

Petit, Dec.  84, 1901, #609, 408}  j 

3 antlo r u on , jun .  25,1910, #947 , 7 7 7 ; 

Ileynard , Jan.  29 , 1 901  ,#6 66 , 819 

Cupps, Jan.  22,1901)#666,493/'all  in  (101-10)} 

Hiller,  at  al.,  May  23,1.905,  #790,516,.} 

Amos, at  al.,  May  26, 1900, #838. 388,  hoi'1’  in  (181-14) } 
r.amh  vc-t ,Doo .  18, 1900, #664, 223,  (181-17). 


IN  THE  UNITED  STATE 

Thomas  A.  Edison 

SOUND  RECORDS  AND  PROCESS  AND 
APPARATUS  EOS  MAKING  SAME 

Piled  August  4,  1911 
Serial  No.  642,377 

HONORABLE  COMMISSIONER  OP  PATENTS, 

SIR: 

In  response  to  the  Offioe  notion  of 
September  21,  1911,  please  amend  the  above  entitled  appli- 
aation  ns  follows :- 

Oanoel  olaims  1  to  15  inclusive,  and  renumber 
olnims  16  to  20  lnolusive  as  1  to  5. 

Add  the  following  claims: - 

6.  In  a  devioe  of  the  olass  described,  the  oombina- 
tion  of  a  base,  rotatable  driving  means  thereon,  a  port- 

able  frame  adapted  to  be  supported  on  said  base  and  pro- 
j  and 

S vided  with  a  rotatable  reoord  support , /means  supported  by 

| said  frame  engageable  with  or  disengageable  from  said  driv¬ 
ing  means  by  bodily  movement  of  said  frame,  whereby  the 
rotation  of  said  driving  means  may  be  imparted  to  said 
reoord  support,  substantially  as  desoribed. 

7.  In  a  devioe  of  the  olass  desoribed,  the  oombina- 
tion  of  a  base,  rotatable  driving  means  thereon,  a  port¬ 
able  frame  adapted  to  be  supported  on  said  base  and  pro¬ 
vided  with  a  rotatable  reoord  support,  and  means  supported 


BS  PATENT  OPPICE 


Room  No.  379. 


(1) 


uy  said  frame  engage able  with  or  disengngeable  from  said 
driving  means  hy  bodily  movement  of  said  frame,  whereby  the 
rotation  of  said  driving  means  may  ho  imparted  to  said 

Ireoerd  support,  said  base  being  provided  with  means  whereby 
aaid  frame  may  be  positioned  in  operative  position  relative¬ 
ly'  to  said  driving  means,  substantially  as  described. 

8.  In  a  device  of  tho  class  described,  the  combina¬ 
tion  with  n  base,  rotatable  driving  means  thereon,  a  plur- 
ality  of  independently  portable  frames  adapted  to  bo  sup¬ 
ported  on  said  base  and  carrying  rotatable  record  supports 
means  supported  by  said  frames  and  engageable  with  or  dis- 
engageable  from  said  driving  means  by  direct  bodily  move¬ 
ment  of  said  frames ,  whereby  the  rotation  of  said  driving 
means  may  be  imparted  to  said  record  supports,  substantially 
as  dosoribed. 

REMARKS 

The  requirement  for  division  made  by  the  Examiner 
I  has  been  complied  with  and  action  on  the  merits  of  the 
claims  now  in  the  case  is  respectfully  requested.  *he 
right  is  reserved  to  file  a  divisional  application  on  tho 
I  subject  matter  of  the  oancoled  oluims. 

The  new  claims  added  herewith  are  drawn  to  tho 
3  invention  as  the  original  claims  retained. 

Respectfully  submitted. 


THOMAS  A.  EDISOIi 

& 


A.  EDiauu 


his Attorney. 


Orange,  Hew  Jersey 
August  lOth,  1912. 


i  .37®—. 


Paper  . 


Ws.hlnnton,  D.  C." 

J.H.Dl-Sut. 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 
UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 


WASHINGTON 


Runt.  27.1912. 


Thomas  A.  Edison, 

Care  Frank  I.  Dyer, 
Orange,  New  Jersey  . 


U.S.  PHTPT  OFFICE, 

SEP  271912 

mailed. 


Please  find  below  a  communication  from  the  EXAMINER  in  charge  of  your  application. 

for  Sound  Reoords  and  Prooesu  and  Apparatus  for  Making  Same, 
filed  Aug.  4,1911, aerial  number  642,377  . 


i  action  la  responsive  to  the  amendment  filed  Aug.  12, 


The  title  of  thiB  applioation  ahould  he  limited  to  conform 
with  the  scope  of  the  claims. 

Claims  6  and  7  are  rejeotejl  as  specifying  only  the  attach¬ 
ment  in  Hays^Aug.  1,1911, #999,646,  (181-3),  or  Bawtrec.June  2, 
1908,  #12,002,(181-3)  . 

Claims  1,  2,  3  and  8  are  rejeoted  as  Bpeoifylng  only  a 
plurality  of  euoh  attachments  as  dlsolosed  in  Hays  or  Bawtreo, 


adapted  to  he  applied  to  the  machines  dlsolosed  in  these  references 
Claim  1  is  also  rejeoted  upon  Spurgeon, Jan.  1,1907,  #839,902, 
(181-4).  All  of  the  claims  are  additionally,  rejeoted  as  specify¬ 
ing  no  more  than  Somber, Aug.^, 1905,  #798°, 034,  or  Romano, June  2, 
1903,  #729^798,  both  in  (181-4)  with  interchange able  record  wheels 
or  chains  respeotirely  . 


Patent  Series 
Patent  Application  Files 

Folio#  777  Manufacture  of  Fertilizing  Material 

Serial  #:  645838 

Primary  Applicant:  Kiefer,  Herman  E 
Date  Filed:  8/24/1911 


6H0  No.  777 

iv'i 

«=?■  "  / 

|  Applicant. 

I’j j!; 

f;  &a*Xhi.,  JP***'- 

|  ~ 

|f|;  .  <  Title  )ha.'vi*<<sj . 


"'OT'®  \“\T'VT 

_  ■  x|i  .v 

Serial 


. 


I  <&  4A  /  7  // .  Examiner’s  Room  No. 


Assignee 
Ass’g’t  Exec. 


(&csL-.2../‘U>,  1(1 

.  ,.  ^daL  'Ccj.JJ’  re.9JJ~*- 


^  ...  ^  .  KA-v^" 


■NL^V  21 

\\^ 

V\  »- 


JW 


:aP^ 

. °*lC . 


frank  l.  dyer, 

Counsel, 

Orange,  New  Jersey. 


dsfflumazCX  fidwim- 

TKe  Edison  Portland  Cement  Co. 


is.  STEWARTSVILLE,  N.  J. 


Thos.  A.  Edison, 

Edison  Laboratory, 

Orange,  N.  -V  i X  >  , 


In  accordance  with  your  notes 


letter  I  have  secured  the  following  to  date:  ^  ^ 

Ortho  ola.se  v  ^ 

Prof.  Hart  of  Lafayette  College  is, 

t‘ 

working  on  a  separation  of  potash  and  alumina,  and  has 
about  200  lbs.  of  good  orthoclaBe  which  he  tells  me  is 
supposed  to  contain  about  13#  of  potash.  We  have  secua 
about  6  lbs.  of  it  for  our  tests.  / 


V  .#4 


We  have  also  secured  5  lbs.  phosphate  j 
*ock  from  Baltimore,  which  analyzes  eb  follows:  \ 


Phosphorio  Acid  (E2®5) 


We  have  ground  these  so  that,  it 
sieve,  and  made  mixtures  as  follows: 


Mr.  lidison, 


#2 


June  1  IS XI 


Mixture  #1 
1  part  of  feldspar 
1  "  "  phosphate 

Mixture  #2 

1  part  of  feldspar 

2  parts  "  phosphate 

Mixture  #3 
2  parts  of  feldspar 
1  part  of  phosphate 

We  have  tried  fusing  all  of  these  in  a  blast  lamp, 
and  find  that  it  can  he  done.  1  enclose  you  under  another 
cover,  specimens  of  eaoh,  which  you  will  note  are  fused  only 
on  the  outside.  Unfortunately  we  cannot  get  neat  enough  to 
fuse  it  in  large  quantities. 

We  have  not  made  analyses  of  them,  as  we  do  not 
have  the  platinum  ware  neoessary  for  alhali  determinations. 
Moreover,  we  only  have  two  men  who  could  make  such  analyses, 
and  all  three  of  us  are  so  busy  on  cement  work,  that  I  hesitate 
at  this  time  (when  shipments  are  heavy)  to  take  the  time 
myself,  or  to  take  them  off  their  regular  work.  I  do  not 
like  to  take  any  chanoe  on  our  regular  work  (even  if  we  had 
the  platinum)  to  investigate  what  may  he  a  phantom. 


Mr.  Edison,  #3  June  1,  1911: 

These  samples  show  that  it  can  be  fused  in  a 


rotary  kiln,  and  if  done,  these  materials  ought  to  show 
the  following  calculated  analyses,  provided  the  potash 


does  not  go  up  the 

,  ^#2 

phosphoric  Aoid  * 

18.9?s 

25.4# 

12.6# 

Potash 

6.5# 

4.4# 

8.7# 

Lime  - 

24.2# 

32.4# 

16.1# 

If  you  are  still  interested  in  this,  and  would 
arrange  to  have  Silver  Lake  Company  fuse  it  in  larger 
quantities,  I  could  make  them  up  mixtures  of  say  a  pound 
each,  and  after  it  is  fused,  find  out  the  composition  and 
the  probable  effect  on  the  phosphoric  acid  and  alkali. 

Part  of  the  alkali  in  feldspar  can  be  extracted  by  boiling 
water.  I  am  under  the  impression  that  after  this  treatment 
it  might  all  be  extracted  this  way. 

We  are  trying  to  get  samples,  analyses  and  prices 
in  oarload  lots  of  phosphates  in  order  to  see  if  there  is 
any  possibility  of  making  it  a  commercial  proposition; 

Have  you  any  further  suggestions? 

You  will  note  that  tha  ingredients  of  highest 
commercial  valud  -  i.e.  potash  and  phosphoric  aoid,  vary 


Mr.  Edison,  #4  June  1,  1911: 

as  they  must  aooording  to  the  proportions,  hut  as  these 
each  sell  at  the- rate  of  about  6/  per  lb.  in  fertilizers, 
the  best  mixture  would  be  the  one  with  the  Lightest  total 
provided  it  would  have  the  same  value  in  a  double  fertilizer. 
The  commercial  phosphate  alone  would  have  a  fertilizer  value 
of  37.5$  X  2000  lbs.  or  750  lbs.  X6$  or  $45  per  ton,  but  we 
know  that  commercial  phosphate  does  not  sell  at  that  price, 
because  it  is  not  all  "available"  -  whether  rotary  kiln 
would  make  it  available  is  the  question?  The  other  question 
is  that  it  is  cheaper  for  the  farmer  to  buy  phosphate  alone 
t.h.n  to  pay  6$  for  it  in  a  mixture,  but  if  our  mixture  of 
potash  (from  a  cheap  source  as  feldspar)  makes  them  both 
available,  then  a  cheap  cost  of  production  would  $mt  them 
on  the  same  basis  as  present  potash-pho sphoric^f ertilizers, 
and  it  should  command  the  same  price  which  we  are  now  paying. 
For  instance  Mixture  #1 


Phosphoric  Acid  18.5$  X  2000 

lbs.  X  6$  - 

$22.6  8 

Potash  6.5$  X  “ 

"  X  6$  - 

7.80 

30.48  per  ton 

Mixture  #2 

Phosphorio  Aoid  25.4$  X  2000 

Lbs.  X  6$  - 

30.48 

Potash  4.4$  X  " 

»  X  6/  - 

5.28 

35.76  per  ton 

Potash 


Mr.  Edison,  #5  June  1,  1911: 

Mixture  #5 

Phosphoric  Acid  12.6$  X  2000  lbs.  X  6/  -  $15.12 

Potash  8.7$  X  "  "  X  6) i  -  10.44 

25.56  per  ton 

The  question  is  will  a  partial  fusion  (clinkering) 
or  even  complete  fusion  of  feldspar  and  calcium  phosphate, 
set  up  new  relations  betv/een  Silioa  -  Alumina  •  Potash  - 
lime  and  Phosphoric  Acid,  similar  to  the  unstable  nature 
of  Portland  Cement  so  that  both  potash  and  phosphoric  acid 
will  be  in  a  shape  acceptable  to  fertilizer  chemist?  as 
"available"?  If  so,  this  looks  like  a  good  proposition. 

The  minor  suggestion  of  fusing  limestone  and 
feldspar,  so  as  to  make  potash  available,  might  even  be  a 
good  idea,  but  if  you  get  lime  and  phosphoric  acid  in  the 
same  material  for  fluxing  with  the  feldBpar,  it  iB  all  the 
better. 


Chem&et. 


Very  truly. 


THe  Edison  Portland  Cement  Co. 


’  Telegraph.  Freight  and  Paiienger  Station.  NEW  VILLAGE.  N.  J. 

p.  o.  address.  STEWARTSVILLE,  N.  J. 


Mr.  Thos.  A.  Edipon, 

Orange 

Bear  Sir 


BOSTON, '  Mash',',  Poatomc 

Ju3yM‘ao’j  19X1."' 


r" 

\|  ^XEHTILIZKR  pLoPOBITI_ON_  ^  f 

Complying  with  your  instructions  I  have j 
had  llr.  Dyers  office  look  up  all  the  patents  on  feldBP^r 
limestone  and  feldspar  phosphate  fertilizers.  Out  of/ a 
great  number  X  have  picked  out  the  following  worthy  c^f 
note. 

LIMESTONE  &  EELPSPAR_ 

BLACKMOKE  PATENT  #515001; 

He  uses  a  sealed  furnace  and  also  a 
chloride.  Rotary  kiln  is  not  even  suggested. 

CUSHUAN  PATENT  #5978185 

Uses  feldspar  limestone  and  a  chloride 

but  no  mention  made  of  rotary  kiln. 


BIC^BLL  PATENT  #16111: 

No  mention  made  of  a  rotary  kiln.  Thic 


1b  nearest  to  our  idea. 


PHOSPHATE  AITO  LIMESTONE 
STILLMAN  PATENT  #306249: 

Does  not  powder  the  material  or  use 

rotary  kiln. 

HODGKINS  PATENT  #423320: 

Uses  lime  and  phosphate  hut  not  rotary 
kiln.  •  In  fact  process  iB  quite  different. 

LOWHAN  PATENT  #422130:  . 

Uses  fluorspar  also  and  does  not  use 

rotary  kiln. 

COATES  PATENT  #614696: 

Uses  carbonate  of  lime  and  phosphate  of 
lime  hut  not  rotary  kiln. 

None  of  these  cover  our  idea  of  phosphate 
and  feldspar  in  rotary  kiln.  In  fact  none  of  them  of 
any  kind  use  rotary  kiln.  If  the  Patent  Office  will 
grant  several  patents  for  the  same  materials  using 
different  methods  of  procedure  I  should  think  they  would 
allow  our  phosphate  feldspar  idea,  when  we  specify 
rotary  kiln  in  connection  with  it.  There  is  a  greater 
similarity  between  some  of  these  patents  than  there  is 


#3. 


Mr.  Edison. 


■between  any  of  then  and  our  ideaB. 


Regardless  of  the  patents  I  shall 
prospect  the  mount aine^-round  here  aB  time  permits 
and  try  to  locate  the  feldspar  you  spoke  of. 

Have  you  any  suggestion  as  to  further 
work  with  a  view  of  application  for  a  patent? 

Very  truly. 


Since  writing  the  above  I  attended  the 
Fertiliser  Convention  at  Atlantic  City,  and  heard  several 
good  talks  by  experts  on  Phosphoric  Acid  and  Potash.  I 
also  had  2  hours  private  talk  with  Dr.  Cameron  of  the 
U.  S.  Bureau  of  Soils  and  learned  a  great  deal,  ghall 
make  a  separate  report  on  it.  To  summarise  the  whole 
thing  1  think  if  we  get  the  potash  feldspar  we  will  Be 
all  right,  patent  or  no  patent,  but  I  also  believe  a 
patent  would  be  granted  on  the  process  I  have  outlined. 


July  22. 


ion. 


!-r.  Thomas  A.  Jidioon, 

Orange,  b.  *!  • 

Hear  Sir:-  -  - 

1  wrote  you  yesterday  concerning  ny  toll: 
with  Hr.  Cameron,  of  the  !).  Bureau  of  Coils.  ho  thoroughly 
confirmed  rny  previous  opinion  that  "soluble"  nnd"ineolublo  ' , 
and' "available"  and  "unavailable"  in  reference  to  phosphoric 
acid  and  potash  arc  only  relative  term  and  in  cither  ease 
it  is  all  avuiloble  in  tine.  Of  the  dozeno  of  methods  of 
analysis,  none  of  then  will  determine  how  readily  "available" 
either  constituent  is  or,  to  time. 

Custom  has  led  to  the  belief  that  phosphoric 
acid  in  natural  phosphates  and  potash  in  feldspar  are  in  the 
so-called  ••unavailable"  states .  Tf  wo  make  any  chance  whatever 
in  their  nature,  ohonloto  are  up  in  the  air  ns  to  how  available 
cither  potnoh  or  phonphoric  acid  become. 

Vor  inotanco  in  Thomas  sloe,  fertilizer 
chemists  permit  an  analysis  for  total  phosphorous  and  make  no 
attempt  to  divide  it  into  -available"  nnd-unavai labia" .  Tf  wo 
make  a  slag  in  a  rotary  kiln  no  doubt  fortilizor  chemists  will 
take  the  same  view  as  wo  shall  novo  a  similar  compound  and 
have  a  right  to  demand  treatment  similar  to  the  Thomas  slag. 


!!o  doubt  they  will  flrant  it  to  avoid  controversy. 

oo  much  for  that.  Cushman  hns  covered 
rotary  kiln  proneaa  for  line,  carbonate  of  lino  and 
folciopar,  but  ;  coo  no  roonon  why  wo  car.  not  patent  rotary 
kiln  process  for  phosphate  of  lino  and  feldspar. 

'.here  is  far  noro  noney  in  ttio  double 
fertilizer  than  the  feldnpar  lineotone  alone,  but  ii  we  can 
not  protect  it  by  patnntr.  the  Southern  cement  nilln  would 
beat  un  out  on  freights  on  phosphate.  T'honrhntc  rooi:  on  o 
baaiu  of  72  '  triphoophato  of  lino  quoted  at  .'3.75 

per  ton  f.o.b.  cars  ",t .  V'loasant,  ’  onn  .  ,  with  a  poor  demand 
for  it.  An  fret  tine  freight  rates  to  see  whore  v;e  stand. 

f  otill  think  the  nrocooo  la  patentable, 
nnv!  enclose  you  a  rouph  copy  of  pronoond  patent  spooifiention 
You  will  rote  that  it  in  quite  different  from  any  of  the 
patonto  f  sent  you.  hiokell  potent,  in  the  nearont,  but  my 
idea  i :r  radically  different  from  hio.  ~f  you  thin):  well  of 
it,  have  : ;r.  Dyer  express  an  opinion  whether  an  idea  on  the  . 
linoo  1  novo  indicated  in  sufficiently  different  from  the 
otnera  tc  have  a  standing  in  the  latent  Office.  )i  wo  onn 
Get  it  patented ,  it  will  at  least  hnvo  an  effect  in  causing 
Southern  oenont  plant. n  to  hesitate  before  rrotnr.  into  it. 


Veiy  truly, 


Gince  writ i nr  the  otovo,  1  hove 
j.v  note  to  co  ahead,  end  olt  sending  a  copy 
tiiio  letter  and  npccificntiono,  eto.,  to 
Dver.  The  host  wny  to  settle  it  io  to 
ve  tha  Patent  Office  reject  it  if  it  in 


i»Q>6)M«n. 

TKe  Edison  Portland  Cement  Co. 


ih.  Freight  and  Peesenger  Station.  NEW  VILLAGE.  N.  J. 

o.  address.  STEWARTSVILLE,  N.  J. 


July  22,  1911. 


Henry  Lanahan,  Esq. , 

legal  Dept.,  Edison  lab'iy.. 
Orange ,  K.  J . 


Dear  Sir:- 

Copieo  of  various  alkali  and  phosphoric 
acid  processes  have  Been  received  and  after  going  over  them 
carefully,  I  see  no  reason  why  a  patent  should  not  be  granted 
on  the  lines  on  which  I  spoke. 

Have  had  it  up  with  Kr.  Edison  and  he 
instructed  me  to  explain  to  you  and  apply  for  a  patent  on 
it.  I  enclose  you  copies  of  the  various  patents  and  a  copy 
of  a  letter  to  him,  showing  why  I  think  my  idea  is  just  ae 
essentially  different  from  any  of  the  existing  patents  es 
any  one  of  them  is  from  anotncr.  It  Beems  to  me  the  simplest 
way  is  for  me  to  draw  up  a  rough  draft  of  an  application, 
as  I  think  it  should  be  drawn  so  as  to  avoid  the  claims  in 
the  otner  patents  This  J  have  done,  and  enclose  this  draft 
which  will  r.o  doubt  have  to  be  revised.  I  think  it  covers 
the  essential  points  and  ohowo  you  wnat  I  am  driving  at. 

Please  compare  this  with  the  patents  which 
I  return,  and  let  me  nave  your  opinion  as  to' whether  it  is 


or  io  not  in  conflict  with  the  other  patento,  altio  any 
suggestions  you  have.  I  can  then  re-write  specifications 
and  claims  and  again  return  to  you  for  revision . 

PleoBe  return  all  the  patents  and  papers 
do  X  can  give  them  further  study  after  getting  your 


suggestions;’ 


very  truly. 


HEK-HBS 


August  5,  1911. 


Dr.  H.  R.  Kiefer,  ,  „  4  - 

o/o  Edison  Portland  Cemen>.  Co., 

Stewartsville ,  K.  J. 

Dear  Sir:- 

X  enoloee  herewith  draft  of  specification  oevering 
your  invention  in  the  manufacture  cf  fort ili King  material. 
After  you  have  looV.ed  over  the  same,  please  return  it  to  me 
with  any  suggestions  as  to  changes  that  may  ooour  to  you. 

I  will  then  have  the  application  written  in  form  for  filing 
and  sent  to  you  for  execution. 

Please  advise  me  if  an  assignment  of  this  invention 
is  to  be  made,  and  if  so,  to  whom.  Also  pleasfe  state  your 
post  offioe  address  to  be  inserted  in  the  Petition. 

fours  very  truly, 

HD-JS 


Eno. 


August  15,  1911. 

/ 

Mr.  Dyer:- 

I  have  prepared  an  application  on  an  invention  of  Dr. 

H.  E.  Kiefer  of  the  Cement  Company  for  rendering  the  potash  in 
feld  spar  and  the  phosphorio  aoid  in  insoluble  phosphates  avail¬ 
able  as  a  fertilizer,  whioh  oonsists  in  subjecting  a  finely  ground 
mixture  of  phosphate  rook  and  feld  spar  to  the  aotion  of  heat  in 
a  rotary  kiln.  Mr.  Edison  is  interested  in  this  invention,  and 
directed  Dr.  Kiefer  to  have  the  Legal  Department  file  an  applica¬ 
tion  on  it.  When  I  sent  the  draft  of  this  speoifioation  to  Dr. 
Kiefer  for  his  approval,  I  inquired  whether  an  assignment  of  the 
invention  was  to  be  made.  Dr.  Kiefer's  reply  is  as  follows :- 
"No  assignment  will  be  neoessary,  bb  the  matter  is  thoroughly 
understood  by  the  Cement  Company".  Please  advise  me  if  we 
shall  file  the  application  without  having  an  assignment  made, 


Dr.  H.  E;  Kiefer, 

c/o  Edison  Portland  Cement  Co., 
Stewartsville,  H.J. 


Dear  Sir:- 

I  enclose  herewith  your  patent  application 
covering  the  invention  of  the  Manufacture  of  Fertilizing 
Material.  Please  execute  this  application  by  signing 
your  full  name,  that  is,  "Herman  E.  Kiefer",  at  the  end 
of  the  petition  on  the  outside  page  of  the  patent  appli¬ 
cation,  at  the  end  of  the  oath,  and  at  the  top.  of  the 
page  containing  the  oath.  The  signature  at  the  top  of 
the  page  containing  the  oath  should  be  witnessed  by  two 
witnesses  and  the  oath  should  be  attested  by  a  notary 
publio.  The  red  sticker  ohould  be  affixed  to  the  oath 
over  the  place  marked  "Seal"  in  such  a  way  as  to  hold  the 
ends  of  the  ribbon  in  place  and  the  notary’s  seal  should 
be  impressed  upon  this  red  sticker. 

After  this  document  has  been  executed,  please 
return  it  to  us  to  be  filed. 

Very  truly  yours. 


HL/ARK. 


General  Counsel. 


HEK-RBS 


Mr.  H.  E.  Kiefer, 

c/o  Edison  Portland  Cement  Co., 

Ste7/artoville,  H.J. 

Dear  Sir:- 

Your  letter  of  the  14th  inet.  addressed  to 
Mr.  Lanahan  has  been  reoeived,  and  he  has  requested  me  to 
send  you  our  complete  file  containing  your  application 
together  with  the  references  cited  therein,  which  appli¬ 
cation  is  entitled  MANUFACTURE  OF  FERTILIZING  MATERIAL, 
(our  folio  Ho.  777),  and  which  I  am  sending  you  today 
by  mail  under  separate  cover. 

Please  arrange  to  return  this  file  to  me  after 
you  are  finished  with  it,  whioh  should  be  about  a  month 
prior  to  Ootober  2nd,  1912,  at  least.  / 

Very  truly  yours,  / 


ARK. 


Clerk. 


£^Kfsa3>£i  fiLs-ffit. 

The  Edison  Portland  Cement  Co. 


I'll  1 1.  a  DKM*  in  A,  Pa.,  Arcade  lluildhn^ 
Boston^  M Asa.’,’  PoU  omre&juare  a 


rman  of  Hoard  Telegraph,  Freight  and  Pamnger  Station.  NEW  VILLAGE, 

A..,.  Tren.  P.  O.  address,  STEWARTSVILLE,  N. . 

February  17,  1912. 

Mr.  Henry  Lannahan, 

Edison  Laboratory, 

Orange,  N.  J. 

Lear  Sir:- 

X  am  in  receipt  of  papers  pertaining  to 
Phosphate  Patents  but  do  not  find  a  copy  of  Cushman's 
patent  #857992.  It  is  not  necessary  to  have  this 
patent  in  full  but  some  years  ago  I  was  a  regular  reader 
of  the  Patent  Office  Gazette  and  if  this  publication  has 
not  been  discontinued  you  probably  have  files  of  it  at 
Orapge.  The  condensed  description  of  the  patent  covers 
10  or  20  lines  only  and  if  you  will  kindly  have  your 
stenographer  cdpy  this  abstract  for  me  it  will  be  of 
great  assistance. 


Very  truly, 


Chemist . 


Sort.  10,  1912 


Dr.  H.  E.  Kief or, 

Edi3on  Portland  Cement  Co, , 

Stowartsvillo,  H.  J. 

Door  Sir:- 

On  Fobruary  15th  last,  tho  comploto  filo  of  your 
application  Polio  777,  Manufacture  of  Fertilising  Matorial, 
together  with  tho  roforonooc  cited  therein,  was  mailed  to 
you  from  thic  office.  Ihia  application  should  now  he 
taken  up  for  amendment.  Will  you  kindly  return  tho  com¬ 
plete  file  to  mo  ac  promptly  as  possible ,  togother  with 
your  comments  and  suggestions.  The  anendment  must  bo 
in  tho  Patont  Office  prior  to  October  2nd. 

Yours  very  truly, 

HL-JS 


The  Edison  Portland  Cement  Co. 


Telegraph,  Fieigkt  end  Puranger  Station,  NEW  VILLAGE,  N.  J. 

p.  o.  address.  STEWARTSVILLE,  N.J. 

Sept. 


Mr.  Henry  Lanahan,  Esq. 
Edison  Laboratory, 
Orange,  H.  J. 


UOSTON,  MABfl.’,'  -O  S  . 


17,  1912. 


Dear  Sir:- 

Herewith  find  all  papers  pertaining  to  the 
fertilizer  process.  I  have  gone  over  them  as  time  permitted 
and  dealt  only  with  the  patents  referred  to  in  Patent  Office 
communication  of  Oct.  2  -  1911.  I  have  attached  oomments  to 
each  of  these  patents. 

Hone  of  them  oonfliot  with  us  hut  WolterB 
is  the  nearest.  If  a  rotary  Kiln  he  used  in  his  process  in¬ 
stead  of  a  Siemens  furnace  and  the  material  reduced  to  clinker 
only  instead  of  "a  fluid  molten  state"  then  our  process  is 
anticipated. 

Hewherry  uses  a  rotary  Kiln  for  a  different 
kind  of  a  fertilizer  and  if  we  are  not  allowed  to  combine 
Wolters  and  Hewherrys  processes  we  have  no  claim  hut  it  loiJks 
to  me  as  though  the  adaption  of  a  rotary  kiln  to  Welters 
materials  is  new  notwithstanding  that  Hewherry  ubos  a  rotary 
kiln  on  other  fertilizing  materials.  Of  course  I  do  not  know. 

The  Patent  Office  exception  to  the  large 
number  of  claims  looks  reasonable.  We  could  simplify  it  by 


Ur.  H.  L. 


-2- 


9-17-1912. 


making  a  few  specific  claims  on  the  ubc  of  a  rotary  kiln  for 
clinkering'^’not  completely  fuaing  a  mixture  of  natural  phos¬ 
phates  and  silicates  containing  alkalies  for  the  purpose  of 
rendering  both  phoBphorio  acid  and  alkalieB  soluble.  There 
ia  nothing  else  to  the  process  and  the  simpler  we  make  it 


the  better  it  looks. 

The  Patent  Office  communication  refers  to 
"calcining"  of  phosphates  in  a  rotary  kiln.  We  do  more  than 
calcining  we  carry  to  incipient  fusion. 

In  view  of  the  various  patents  I  do  not 


know  whether  it  is  advisable  to  spend  much  more  money  on  it. 
nevertheless  I  have  given  you  the  data  and  if  you  think  a 
simplified  amendment  olaiming  only  what  I  have  outlined  abCve 
will  be  granted  it  might  be  worth  a  trial. 


Chemist. 


HEK-rS 


Dear  Sir: 

In  compliance  with  your  rocuost  of  the  14th  infit.,  X 
ojn  a ending  you  today,  by  oxprosB,  the  complete  file  containing 
your  application,  together  with  the  references  cited  therein,  said 
application  being  entitled  Manufacture  of  fertilising  Material  (our 
folio  Ko.  777). 

I  do  not  understand  that  it  has  been  finally  deter¬ 
mined  to  drop  this  application,  and  in  case  it  is  to  bo  dropped, 
we  should  like  to  have  Hr.  Edison’s  authority  for  such  action.  X 
should  be  glad  to  have  your  views  as  to  the  advisability  of  pro¬ 
ceeding  with  the  prosecution  of  the  application,  or  to  have  you 
toko  the  matter  up  with  Mr.  Edison  personally,  if  you  desiro. 

She  nezt  amendment  must  be  filed  in  the  Office 
before  October  30th,  and  if  the  application  is  to  be  amended, 
this  file  should  be  returned  to  the  legal  Department  not  later 
than  the  1st  of  October. 

Very  truly  yours. 


HIi/MJIi 


Ootober  8,  1913 


H.  E.  Kiefer, 

Edison  Portland  Cement  Co., 
ts-hnwnrtfiville  .  N«  J# 


Dear  Sir:- 

Ibe  „,.t  emmdmmt  In  your  epplio.tlon  entitled  »=n«- 

faotura  of  J.rtllieinS  »”  "li0  St"  777’  “  *“ 

1.  tbe  Potent  OHioe  b.foro  ootober  Wtb.  *»  me  01 

«bl.  epplio.tlon  ...  eon.  to  you  .bout  tbo  U»  <*  WO-*  I***' 
■HU  you  kindly  return  the  .«■«  to  tbie  aep.rt.ent  no  .oon  ..  . 

pr.otlo.bl.  1»  order  tb.t  tb.  .otter  of  tbe  »enl.on.  -y  b. 
taken  up.  Alee  kindly  let  be  »™  J™r  rleee  »e  to  tbo  .dvie- 
ability  of  pro...dtn8  ««b  tb.  proe.outlon  of  tbe  epplloatlou. 

Very  truly  yours, 


HWS 


dieJ  'S’, tin. 


Patent  Series 


Patent  Application  Files 


Folio  #  785  Charging  Secondary  Cells  and  Utilizing  the  Current 
Therefrom 

Serial#:  651697 

Primary  Applicant:  Hutchison,  Miller  Reese 


Date  Executed:  9/26/1911 


’4V‘\  Folio  No.7i.£ . 

'  : 


Applicant. 

.  . (jOk&iUL* 

. . . JlM*/... 


Serial  No '..k.'^AAS-’f- 

d  C'Ui'rf,  C^V, 

Address. 


j; ;  Title  .'&AatA*ii**ks*eL~dtlc4ilus^^  . 

|  "  f  vTVd-i^UT^.  "  • 

:r'  Filed/tfyi'b^ru-^vi/  <2  d' }  /  (f  // .  Examiner’s  Room  No. /<?..s£Z . 


l/3cut£t*-y. 

t  zLrfm  Recorded  .4M.^.S./u Liber  4C..U.. . Page *  A 


2  Cilia. 


■  l .?/.?.. 0..  n 


81  %r^f  TCck- 
83  (^.  ttj>4  - 

24  ... .  . .>.../ . I . 


,^.!Z:,UC7^  , 
7v!^v  1(,  / 


.  7_  —  ^...":rl::-....!r= 

7-2/- 


29  Y'<^....._ '\./'v...'.i.'.'..l:.': 

UUU^-^.  .  W£ 


l  ‘ 


FRANK  L.  DYER, 

Counsel, 

Orange,  New  Jersey. 


petition 


®o  tlje  Commissioner  o!  patents: 

gour  petitioner  kiijjsh  rkese  Hutchison 

a  citizen  of  tfje  fHnitcb  States,  residing  anb  fjabing  a  $oSt  Office  abbreSS  at 

V/est  Orange,  Essex  County,  Now  Jersey 


praps  tijat  letters  patent  map  be  granteb  to  Ijim  for  tlje  improbcments  in 

.  CHARGING  SECONDARY  CELLS  AND  UTILISING  'THE  CURRENT 
THEREFROM 


Set  fortlj  in  tlje  atmexeb  specification ;  ant)  Ije  Ijerebp  appoints  Jfranfe  TL.  ©per 
(Registration  J?o.  560),  of  Orange,  J*ehi  ferSep,  bis  attornep,  luitb  fnU 
potoer  of  substitution  anti  reboeation,  to  prosecute  tljis  application,  to  mabe 
alterations  anti  amenbments  therein,  to  receibe  the  patent,  anb  to  transact  all 
business  in  tlje  patent  Office  connecteb  tberebiitb. 


SPECIFICATION 
TO  All  WHOM  IT  MAT  CONCERN: 

BE  IT  KNOWN,  that.  I,  MILLER  REESE  HUTCHISON,  a 
citizen  of  the  United  States  ana  a  resident  of  West  Orange, 
in  the  County  of  Essex  ana  State  of  New  Jersey,  have  inven¬ 
ted  certain  new  ana  useful  improvements  in  CHARGING  SECOND- 
ART  C El. IS  ANT)  UTILISING  THE  CURRENT  THEREFROM,  of  whioh  the 
following  is  a  speoifioation:- 

My  invention  relates  generally  to  a  method  ana 
means  for  charging  one  or  a  battery  of  secondary  or  re¬ 
versible  colls  ana  for  utilizing  the  current  therefrom,  and 
more  particularly  to  the  oharging  of  suoh  cells  from  a 
souroe  of  ourrent  whioh  is  inadequate  to  charge  the  oell  or 
battery  efficiently  in  the  ordinary  manner,  and  to  the 
utilization  of  ourrent  from  one  or  more  groups  of  elements 
of  suoh  oells  at  a  time.  My  invention  is  also  particular¬ 
ly  adapted  to  the  oharging  of  secondary  oells  whioh  are 
looated  in  oonfined  spaoes  diffioult  to  oool  and  ventilate. 

In  modern  storage  battery  development  the  tendenor 
is  toward  the  employment  of  large  oells,  eaoh  having  a 
great  number  of  positive  and  negative  elements  or  plates. 
This  is  especially  true  in  submarine  boat  praotioe,  and  1b 
occasioned  by  the  great  inorease  in  size  of  suoh  boats  as 
the  art  progresses.  One  of  the  greatest  difficulties  met 
with  in  the  operation  of  storage  batteries  in  submarines 
lies  in  the  neoessarily  inadquate  faoilitieB  for  ventila- 


(1) 


tion  ancl  oooling.  In  suoh  vessels  there  is  not  sufficient 
spaoe  available  to  permit  the  provision  of  large  air  duots 
into,  through  ana  out  of  the  battery  tanks  or  reoeptaoles. 
Furthermore,  relatively  large  exhaiist  ports  of  this 
oharaoter  are  not  permissible  in  submarine  boat  aesign, 
beoanse  suoh  vessels  must  have  as  few  ana  as  small  outlets 
as  possible,  to  facilitate  water  tightness  under  great  hy¬ 
drostatic  pressure.  The  difficulties  of  oooling  und  ven¬ 
tilation  are  increased  where  lead  or  acid  storago  battery 
oells  are  employed.  Owing  to  the  fragility  of  the  hard 
rubber  containing  jars  of  oells  of  this  type,  it  is  neo- 
essary  to  reinforoe  them  by  placing  them  in  oompartments 
of  the  battery  tank  of  the  boat  in  suoh  a  manner  that 
the  fore  ana  aft  ana  oross  members  of  the  oompartments 
|  will  support  the  containing  jars  and  provide  the  requis¬ 
ite  meohanioal  strength  for  the  same.  It  is  apparent 
that  a  cell  placed  in  suoh  a  compartment  and  fitting 
tightly  therein  oannot  be  oooled  exoept  from  the  top. 

For  these  reasons  and  also  on  aooount  of  the  poor  heat 
conducting  properties  of  hard  rubber  and  wooa ,  it  is 
found  difficult  to  oharge  the  batteries  of  submarines 
in  tropioal  waters  within  a  reasonable  length  of  time 
because  of  the  injury  done  to  a  lead  cell  by  allowing 
the  temperature  of  the  oell  to  rise  above  110°  Fahr. 

These  conditions  necessitate  oharging  the  batteries  for 
a  long  time  at  a  low  rate,  or  for  a  short  time  at  normal 
rate  until  the  temperature  limit  has  been  reaohed,  and 
then  disconnecting  and  allowing  them  to  oool  before  con¬ 
tinuing  the  oharge.  In  the  oase  of  storage  battery  oells 
of  the  Edison  type,  no  serious  permanent  injury  is  done 


the  oells  by  oharging  them  at  high  temperatures.  When  j 
oharged  in  this  manner,  however,  their  efficiently  for  that 
oharge  is  decreased.  When  oells  of  the  Edison  type  are 
used  in  submarine  boats,  the  oells  may  be  spaaed  apart 
by  vertioal  separators,  and  the  containing  oans  being  of 
metal,  have  bettor  heat  oonduoting  and  radiating  properties 
than  those  of  the  load  or  aoid  oells.  With  this  arrange¬ 
ment,  air  may  be  taken  into  the  battery  tank  at  the  bottom 
of  one  end  find  drown  out  from  the  top  of  the  tank  at  the 
other  end,  whereby  a  flow  of  air  by  and  between  all  the 
oells  is  obtained.  But  even  with  suoh  an  improved  in¬ 
stallation  it  is  a  diffioult  matter  to  oool  the  interior  of 
a  very  large  cell  and  there  is  not  suffioient  space  avail¬ 
able  to  permit  making  the  oells  up  in  smaller  sizes  and 
paralleling  them.  In  the  case  of  Edison  type  oells  of  high 
disoharge  rate  oapaoity  and  low  internal  resistanoe,  the 
maximum  effioienoy  is  obtained  by  oharging  at  relatively 
high  rates.  Eor  example,  while  the  large  tube  type  oell 
oan  be  charged  efficiently  at  the  7-hour  rate,  the  small 
tube  type  Bhould  be  charged  at  not  less  than  a  3-hour  »r 
4-hour  rate  and  is  preferably  charged  at  a  ?.-hour  rate  whers 
the  oells  oan  be  oooled  properly.  The  oharging  of  bat¬ 
teries  in  submarine  vessels  is  often  done  by  driving  the 
motor  as  a  dynamo  when  the  boat  is  being  propelled  on  the 
surfaoe  by  the  oil  engines.  Suoh  motors  are  seldom 
capable  of  furnishing  suffioient  current  to  oharge  the 
battery  in  three  or  four  hours,  even  though  the  engines  be 
large  enough  to  drive  both  boat  and  generators. 

The  objeots  of  my  invention  are  to  overoome  many 
of  the  difficulties  hereinbefore  pointed  out  and  to  provide 


(3) 


an  efficient  method  and  means  for  charging  secondary  cells i 
j|  whioh  require  oharging  at  a  rate  higher  than  is  oapable  | 
of  being  furnished  by  the  source  of  current  available  when 
|  employing  ordinary  methods,  and  also  to  enable  ourrent  from 

{  any  desired  number  of  groups  of  elements  of  secondary  oelln 

1  to  be  efficiently  and  readily  utilized.  My  improved  math- 
|  od  consists  generally  in  supplying  ourrent  to  one  or  more 
I  groups  of  the  elements  or  plates  of  the  oells  at  a  time .  / 

j  ^  also,  when  desired,  in  uMA4-ai-nB-^UT^ent-by-  taking  44-  j  ^ 
from  any  desired  number  of  such  groups  of  elements. 

|  In  order  to  render  my  invention  more  easily  under- 

stood,  reference  is  had  to  the  drawing  accompanying  and 
!l  forming  a  port  of  this  specification,  and  in  whioh  the 
||  figure  illustrates  diagrammatioally  an  arrangement  of 

oirouits  and  apparatus  adapted  to  oarry  out  my  invention. 

|  In  the  drawing,  secondary  or  reversible  oells 

are  shown  at  A  and  B.  It  will  be  apparent  that  my  inven- 
tion  is  applicable  to  a  single  cell  or  to  any  number  of 
!  oells.  The  positive  and  negative  elements  of  each  of  the  i 
oells  are  arranged  ingroups  «md  eaoh  group  is  preferably 
provided  with  its  own  insnlated  binding  posts  or  other  \ 

jj  terminals.  I  have  illustrated  eaoh  of  the  oells  as  divid-'  j 
I  ed  into  four  groups  of  elements.  The  groups  of  positive 
j  elements  of  cell  A  are  indicated  at  A  1,  A  2,  A  3,  and  A  4 
and  are  provided  with  binding  posts  or  other  terminals  A _5, 

J  A  6 ,  A  7,  and  A  8  respectively.  The  groups  of  negative 

(elements  are  indicated  at  A  9 .  A  10,  A  11,  and  A  12  and  ar< 
provided  with  the  binding  posts  or  other  terminals  A  13, 

A  14,  A  15,  and  A  16  respectively.  The  groups  of  positivf 


(4) 


I  1  elements  A  1,  A  2,  A  3,  ana  A  4  are  aBBOOiatad  with  the  I 

groups  of  negative  elements  A  9,  A  10 ,  A  11  and  A  12  res-  | 

peotively.  The  oell  B  has  its  elements  arranged  in  the 
same  manner  as  those  of  the  oell  A.  The  first  group  of 
elements  of  this  oell  oomprises  the  positive  elements  31 
ana  the  negative  elements  B  £,  the  positive  elements  B  1 
having  connected  thereto  a  binding  post  or  other  terminal 
B  5  and  the  negative  elements  B  9  having  connected  thereto 
a  binding  post  or  other  terminal  B  IS.  The  second  group 
oomprises  positive  elements  B  2  and  negative  elements  B  10 
provided  with  binding  posts  or  other  terminals  B  6  and  B  14 
respectively.  The  third  group  comprises  positive  elements 
ft  s  and  negative  elements  B  11  provided  with  binding  posts 
II  or  other  terminals  B  7  and  B  15  respectively.  The  fourth 
group  oomprises  positive  elements  B  4  and  negative  elements 
B  12  provided  with  binding  posts  or  other  terminals  B  8 
I  ana  B  16  respectively.  Eaoh  of  the  groups  of  elements  of 
I  eaoh  of  the  oells  may  comprise  tho  same  number  of  positive 
elements  as  of  negative  elements,  as  for  example,  fifteen 
of  each,  or  preferably  there  is  one  more  negative  element 
than  positive  element  in  eaoh  group,  as,  for  example,  fif¬ 
teen  positive  elements  and  sixteen  negative  elements. 

As  a  means  for  charging  the  battery  and  as 
I  illustrating  my  improved  method,  the  following  arrangement 
|  of  circuits  may  be  employed:-  Direct  ourrent  mains  are 
I  shown  at  1  and  2  and  are  provided  with  suitable  terminals 
I  3  and  4  respectively,  whioh  are  adapted  to  be  connected  to 
I  any  suitable  souroe  of  aurrent ,  as,  for  example,  the  gener-j 
I  ator  D,  by  means  of  the  switch  ,3,  the  terminal  J5  being  in- 


(5) 


1  tended  to  be  oonneotea  to  the  positive  brush  or  terminal  od ' 
the  souroe  of  current,  and  the  terminal  4  being  intended  tc 
||  be  oonnaoted  to  the  negative  brush  or  terminal  of  the  source 
|  "  of  ourrent,  The  generator  D  may  be  a  dynamo  eleotrio  ma- 

Iohine  adapted  to  be  driven  at  other  times  as  a  motor  by 
ourrent  supplied  from  the  battery. 

I  j>or  oharging  the  first  group  of  elements  of  eaoh 

|i  oell,  a  double  pole  switoh  5  is  provided,  having  one  termi- 
1  nal  oonneotea  to  the  positive  direot  ourrent  main  1  by  the 

Ioonduotor  6,  and  another  terminal  oonneoted  to  the  negative 
aireot  ourrent  main  2  by  the  oonduotor  7..  The  terminal  of 
the  switch  5  which  is  adapted  to  be  oonneotea  to  the  posi¬ 
tive  side  of  the  direot  ourrent  main  1  through  the  oonduot- 
or  6  when  the  switch  is  olosea  is  oonneoted  to  the  positive 
terminal  A  5  of  the  first  group  of  elements  of  the  oell  A 
||  by  the  oonduotor  8,  and  the  terminal  of  the  switoh  5 
I  which  is  adapted  to  be  oonneoted  to  the  negative  direot 
ourrent  main  2  through  the  oonduotor  V  when  the  switch  is 
olosed  is  oonneotea  by  the  oonduotor  £  to  the  negative 
I  terminal  B  13  of  the  first  group  of  elements  of  the  oell 
B.  The  negative  terminal  A  13  of  the  first  group  of 
j  elements  of  the  oell  A  is  oonneoted  by  the  oonduotor  10 

I  to  the  positive  terminal  B  5  of  the  first  group  of  elements 
of  the  oell  B.  For  oharging  the  second  group  of  elements 
of  eaoh  of  the  cells,  a  double  pole  switch  11  is  provided 
having  one  terminal  oonneoted  to  the  positive  direot  ourr¬ 
ent  main  1  by  the  oonduotor  12  and  another  terminal  oon¬ 
neotea  to  the  negative  direot  ourrent  main  2  by  the  oon- 


(6) 


dilator  13.  The  terminal  of  the  switch  11  whioh  is  adapted 
to  be  oonneoted  to  the  positive  direot  ourrent  main  1 
through  the  oonduotor  12  when  the  switah  is  alosed  is  oon¬ 
neoted  by  the  oonduotor  14  to  the  positive  terminal  A  6  of 
the  seoond  group  of  elements  of  oell  A,  and  the  terminal 
of  the  Bwitoh  11  whioh  is  adapted  to  be  oonneoted  to  the 
negative  direot  ourrent  main  2  through  the  oonduotor  13 
when  the  switch  is  olosed  is  oonneoted  by  the  oonduotor  15 
to  the  negative  terminal  B  14  of  the  seoond  group  of  ele¬ 
ments  of  the  oell  B.  The  negative  terminal  A  14  of  the 
seoond  group  of  elements  of  the  oell  A  is  oonneoted  by  the 
oonduotor  16  to  the  positive  terminal  B  6  of  the  seoond 
group  of  elements  of  the  oell  B.  For  oharging  the  third 
group  of  elements  of  eaoh  of  the  oellS!  a  double  pole  switol 
17  ia  provided  having  one  terminal  oonneoted  to  the  posi¬ 
tive  direot  ourrent  main  1  by  the  oonduotor  18  and  the 
other  terminal  oonneoted  to  the  negative  direot  ourrent 
main  2  by  the  oonduotor  19.  The  terminal  of  the  switoh 
17  whioh  is  adapted  to  be  oonneoted  to  the  direot  ourrent 
main  1  through  the  oonduotor  18  when  the  switoh  is  olosed 
is  oonneoted  by  a  oonduotor  20  to  the  positive  terminal 
A  7  of  the  third  group  of  elements  of  the  oell  A,  and  the 
terminal  of  the  switoh  IV  whioh  iB  adapted  to  be  oonneoted 
to  the  negative  direot  ourrent  main  2  through  the  oonduot¬ 
or  W  when  the  switoh  is  olosed  is  oonneoted  by  oondiiotor 
SI  to  the  negative  terminal  B  15  of  the  third  group  of 
elements  of  the  oell  B.  The  negative  terminal  A  15  of  the 
third  group  of  elements  of  the  oell  A  is  oonneoted  by  the 
oonduotor  22  to  the  positive  terminal  B  7  of  the  third 
group  of  elements  of  the  oell  B.  For  oharging  the  fourth 


(7) 


group  of  elements,  a  double  pole  switch  23  is  provided  hav 
ing  one  terminal  oonneoted  by  the  oondnotor  24  to  the  posi¬ 
tive  direot  ourrent  main  1  and  another  terminal  oonneoted 
by  a  oondnotor  25  to  the  negative  direot  ourrent  main  2. 

The  terminal  of  the  switoh  23  whioh  is  adapted  to  be  oon¬ 
neoted  t  o  the  positive  direct  ourrent  main  1  through  the 
oonduotor  24  when  the  switoh  is  olosod  is  oonneoted  by  a 
oonduotor  26  to  the  positive  terminal  A  8  of  the  fourth 
group  of  elements  of  the  oell  A,  and  the  terminal  of  the 
switoh  23  whioh  is  adapted  to  be  oonneoted  to  the  negative 
direot  current  main  2  through  the  oonduotor  25  when  the 
switoh  is  olosed  is  oonneoted  by  a  oonduotor  27  to  the 
|  negative  terminal  B  16  of  the  fourth  group  of  elements  of 

I  It  he  oell  B.  The  negative  terminal  A  16  of  the  fourth 
group  of  elements  of  the  oell  A  is  oonneoted  by  the  oonduot¬ 
or  28  to  the  positive  terminal  B  8  of  the  fourth  group  of 
elements  of  the  oell  B. 

When  Charging  the  oells,  one  or  more  of  the 
switohes  may  be  olosed  at  one  time,  while  the  remainder 
of  the  switohes  remain  open.  for  example,  the  switoh  5 
may  be  olosed  first  and  a  oirouit  is  thus  established 
from  the  positive  direot  ourrent  main  1  through  the  oon¬ 
duotor  6,  through  one  member  of  the  switoh  5,  through  the 
oonduotor  8  to  the  positive  terminal  A  5  of  the  first  group 
of  elements  of  the  oell  A,  through  the  first  group  of  ele¬ 
ments  A  1  and  A  9  of  the  oell  A  to  the  negative  terminal 
A  13  of  the  first  group  of  elements  of  the  oell  A,  through 
the  oonduotor  10  to  the  positive  terminal  B  5  of  the  first 
group  of  elements  of  the  oell  B,  through  the  first  group 

(8) 


of  elements  B  1  and  B  9,  of  the  oell  B  to  the  negative 
terminal  B  IB,  through  the  oonfluotor  9 ,  through  one  member 
of  the  switoh  5  and  the  oonduotor  J7  'fco  1,he  negative  direct 
current  main  S.  In  this  manner,  the  first  group  of  ele¬ 
ments  of  eaoh  of  the  oells  is  oharged.  After  this 
group  of  elements  has  been  oharged,  the  switoh  5  is 
opened  and  the  switoh  11  olosed.  The  closing  of  the 
switoh  11  establishes  a  oirouit  from  the  positive  direot 
ourrent  main  1  through  the  seoond  group  of  elements  of  eaoh 
oell  and  baoh  to  the  negative  direct  current  main  2.  After 
this  group  of  elements  has  been  fully  oharged,  the  switoh 
11  is  opened  and  the  switoh  17  olosed.  The  olosing  of  the 
switoh  17  establishes  a  oirouit  from  the  positive  direot 
ourrent  main  1  through  the  third  group  of  elements  of  eaoh 
oell  and  baok  to  the  negative  direot  ourrent  main  Z.  After 
this  group  of  elements  has  been  fully  oharged,  the  switoh  17i 
is  opened.  The  switoh  23,  is  then  olosed  and  the  olosing  of 
this  switoh  establishes  a  oirouit  from  the  positive  diroot 
ourrent  main  1  through  the  fourth  group  of  elements  of  eaoh 
oell  and  baoh  to  the  negative  direot  ourrent  main  jj.  After 
this  group  of  elements  has  been  oharged,  the  switoh  2!3  may 
be  opened.  Obviously,  it  is  immaterial  in  what  order  the 
switohes  are  olosed.  Under  oertnin  oiroumstanoes,  it  may 
be  advantageous  to  close  several  of  the  switohes  at  a  time 
as,  for  example ,  switohes  5  and  17  at  one  time,  and  11  and 
23  at  another.  After  all  the  groups  of  elements  have  been 
oharged,  the  souroe  of  ourrent  oan  fce  disoonneoted  from  the 
terminals  3  and  4,  as  by  opening  the  switch  S. 


(9) 


I 


It  will  be  apparent  that  I  have  provided  a  \ 

I 

method  for  oharging  a  battery  requiring  a  high  oharging  rate  I 
from  a  souroe  of  ourrent  inadequate  to  supply  ourrent  at  .  I 
the  oharging  rate  required  for  tho  entire  battery  when 
charged  in  tho  ordinary  way.  For  example,  if  in  the  battery 
illustrated,  in  which  there  are  four  subdivisions ,  a.  ourrent 
of  2400  amperes  is  required  to  efficiently  oharge  the  bat¬ 
tery,  the  oharging  may  bo  efficiently  aooomplished  by  my  im¬ 
proved  method  from  a  source  of  current  oapable  of  supplying 
only  600  amperes.  Furthermore,  in  oharging  a  battery  by 
my  improved  method,  the  advantage  of  having  a  large  quanti¬ 
ty  of  electrolyte  is  obtained ,  and  the  heating  is  materially 
refluoed  both  on  account  of  the . relatively  small  ourrent  em¬ 
ployed  and  the  large  quantity  of  elaotrolyte  present  to 
radiate  the  heat  through  the  relatively  large  containing 


A-f-ter-the-battery-haiD-boen-oha-rged-.-^the-i-our-rent-i 
be-uti-l.i-zed-bv-closing-alL-0.f_the-Swltohos_5.._lL,-lg_and  .22., 
and-ourrent-taken— from-the— ba-ttary-by-oonneo-t-ing— the-termi- 
nals-3-and-4-to-a-oi-roui-t— oonta-ini-ng— eu-i-tabl-e-t-Kins-lat-ihg— / 
devices,  as,  for  example,  the  circuit  containing  the  lamps 
1,  by  moans  of  tho  switoh'S..  Or,  if  desired,  the  generator] 
D  may  he  run  as  a  motor  from  the  battery  by  connecting, the 
terminals  3  and  4  to  the  circuit  containing  tho  same  by  j  • 
means  of  the  3witoh  S_-  It  may  also  be  desired  to  utilize 
the  current  from  only  one  or  two  or  throe  groiips  of  elements 
In  parallel,  keeping^ the  other  groups  for  emergency  work. 

It  is  well  known  that  the  electromotive  foroe  of  a  oell  is 
highest  at  the  beginning  of  discharge,  and  ourrent  taken 
from  a  single  fully  oharged  group  of  elements  may  be  util - 
ized  for  running  the  motor  on  short  runs  or  praotioe  oruises 
The  reoharging  of  the  battery  is  thus  facilitated,  and  fully] 
oharged  groups  are  always  available  for  emergenoieB. 

(10). 


Having  now  aesoribea  my  invention,  whet  I  olaim 
aa  new  and  desire  to  protect  by  letters  Patent  of  the 
United  States  is^as  follows : -  ^  ^  /  ^ 

\i  The  method- of  oharging  a  secondary  cell,  which 
consists  in  supplying  current  to  some  of  the  elements  of 
the  colouring  one  period  and  to  other  elements  during 
another  period,  substantially  as  set  forth. 

2.  7  he'-,  method  of  oharging  a  battery  of  ^secondary 
cells,  which  coasts  in  supplying  ourrentAto  smae  of  the 
elements  of  eaohWl  during  one  period  and^to  other 
elements  of  each  cell  during  another  period,  substantially 

set  forth.  \ 

3.  The  method  of \o barging  a  secondary  oell,  whiah 
oonsists  in  supplying  cur^nt  successively  to  groups  of 
elements  of  the  oell,  subs W i ally  as  sot  forth. 


4.  The  method  of  oharging 


ging  a  battery  of  secondary 
cells,  which  oonsists  in  supplying  oixrrent  successively 
to  a  group  of  elements  of  eaoh  oell,  substantially  as  set 
forth.  \ 

5.  The  method  of  charging  a  bakery  of  seoondary  oel| 
which  consists  in  supplying  current  to  groups  of  elements 
in  succession,  eaoh  group  containing  one  group  of  elements 
of  eaoh  cell,  substantially  as  set  forth. 

The  oombination  of  a  sub-dividea  secondary 
cell  and  means  for  supplying  current  to  any  deeded  sub¬ 
division  of  the  oell.  substantially  as  described. 


(11) 


r.  The  combination  of  a  battery  of  sub-divided 
seoondary  oellB,  oonneotions  between  sub-divisions  of 
j  different'  o ells,  and  means  for  supplying  current  to  any 
desired  set  of  connected  sub-aivisions ,  substantially  as 
,  described. 

3.  A  seoondary  oell  having  groups  of  elements,  each 
I  group  being  provided  with  terminals,  substantially  as 
described. 

19.  A  seoondary  ''oell  having  groups  of  elements, 
eaoh  group  being  provided  with  terminals,  and  means  for 
|j  connecting  eaoh  group  of  elements  in  a  separate  oirouit , 
i|  substantially  as  described. 

||  10.  The  combination  of  a  seoondary  oell  having  its 

||  elements  arranged  in  groups,  and  a  separate  oirouit  for 

[each  group  of  elements,  substantially  as  described. 

11.  The  combination  of  a  battery  of  seoondary  cells 
||  eaoh  oell  having  its  elements  arranged  , in  groups,  and 
means  for  oonneoting  in  separate  circuit's  one  group  of 
elements  of  eaoh  oell,  substantially  as  described. 

jj  12.  The  combination  of  a  battery  of  seoondary  cells - 

|  eaoh  oeli  having  its  elements  arranged  in  groups,  and 
1  means  whereby  separate  circuits  may  be  suooessively 

established  containing  one  group  of  elements  of  each  oell, 
j  substantially  as  described. 

155.  The  combination  of  a  battery  of  seoondary 
I  oells ,  eaoh  oell  having  its  elements  arranged  in  groups  ,X 


(12) 


Ia  source  of  ourrent ,  and  means  for  oonneotinB  in  a  single  ^ 
oirouit  with  the  souroe  of  current  one  gro^.p  of  elements 
of  eaoh  cell,  substantially  as  described. 

14.  The  combination  of  a  battery  of  secondary- .cells... 
each  cell  having  its  elements  arranged  in  groups,  a  source 
I  of  current  and  means  for  connecting  successively  in  a  ^ 

I]  single  circuit  with  the  soxiroe  of  current  one  group  of 

I  elements  of  enoh  cell,  substantially  as  described. 

v-  15.  The  method  of  utilizing  ourrent  from  a  secondary 
0eii,  which  consists  in 'talcing  ourrent  from  some  of  the  ale - 
p  ments  of  the  cell  during  one  period  and  from  other  elements 
|j  during  another  period,  substantially  as  set  forth. 


16.  The  method  of  utilizing  (the) current  from  a  bat¬ 

tery  of  secondary  cells,  which  consists  in  talcing  ourrent, 
from  some  of  the  elements  of  eaohoell  during  one  period 
andAfrom  other  dements  of  each  colouring  another  period 
substantially  as  set  forth.  \ 

17.  The  method  of  utilizing  current  from  a  secondary] 
cell,  which  consists  in  talcing  ourrent  successively  from 
groups  of  elements  of  the  cells,  substantially  as  set  forth| 

18.  The  method  of  utilizing  ourrent  from,  a  battery 

of  secondary  cells,  which  consists  in  talcing  current  suc¬ 
cessively  from  a  group  of  elements  of  eaoh  cell,  sub¬ 
stantially  as  set  forth.  \ 

19.  The  method  of  utilizing  current  from  a  batteW 
of  secondary  cells,  which  consists  in  talcing  current  from, 
groups  of  elements  in  succession,  eaoh  group  containing  on  ^ 
group  of  elements  of  esoh  cell,  substantially  os  set  forth 


(13) 


v20.  The  combination  of  a  sub-divided  secondary  coll 
and  mine  fo^uti^ing  current  from  any  desired  sub-divisijn 
of  the  cell,  substantially  as  described.  I 

21.  \ho  combination  of  a  battery  of  sub-divided  sec¬ 
ondary  cells ^connections  ^between  sub-divisions  of  differ-  I 
ent  cells,  andNnenns  for  Rising  current  from  any  desired  |  ' 
set  of  oonnectea\ub-divisions.  substantially  as  described. j 

22,  The  combination  of  a  battery  of  secondary  cells, 

each  cell  having  its  elements  arranged  in  groups,  a  trans¬ 
lating  device,  and  means\for  connecting  in  a  single  series  j  * 
with  the  translating  devio\  one  group  of  elements  of  each  J 
cell,  substantially  as  described.  j 

255,  The  combination  of  battery  of  secondary  cells,  j 
each  cell  having  its  elements  arranged  in  groups,  a  trrns-  j  . 
lating  devioe.  and  means  for  connecting  suooessively  in  a 
single  circuit  with  the  translating  devioe  one  group  of 
elements  of  each  cell,  substantially  as\described. 

24'.  The  combination  of  a  battery  oi,seoondary  cells, 
j  eaoh  cell  having  its  elements  arranged  in  groups,  a  trans- 
I  lating  device,  and  means  for  connecting  in  a  single  circuit 
with  the  said  translating  devioe  any  desired  number  of  |- 

J  Broups  of  elements  of  eaoh  cell,  substantially  as  described. 

125.  The  combination  of  a  secondary  cell  having,  its 
elements  arranged  in  groups,  a  discharge  circuit,  and  means 
for  discharging  any  desired  number  of  said  groups  through 
said  discharge  circuit .  substantially  as  described.  \ 


(14) 


'  26.  "he  oorabination  of  a  battery  of  secondary  oells, 

Ieaoh  cell  having  its  elements  arranged  in  groups,  a  dis¬ 
charge  circuit,  and  means  for  discharging  any  desired 
jj  number  of  groups  simultaneously  through  said  discharge 
j‘  oirouit,  substantially  as  described. 

1 

|  27.  The  combination  of  a  secondary  cell  having  its 

jj  elements  arranged  in  groups,-  a  oirouit,  and  means  for  oon- 
neoting  any  number  of  said  groups  to  said  oirouit,  sub- 
jj  stnntially  aB  described. 

s 

jj  28.  The  combination  of  a  battery  of  secondary  oells, 

jj  eaoh  oell  having  its  elements  arranged  in  groups ,  a  oirouit 
£  and  means  for  oonneoting  any  number  of  said  groups  of  ele- 
jl  ments  to  said  oirouit,  substantially  as  described. 


fEIjis  Specification  signet)  ant)  butnesseb  tljis  2l#  ^  bap  of  tb/UttnX.tX 9 XI- 

1 . /■}■(,  iaSu.^  . 

2.  I/P  AcUy,^ . 


©atb. 


State  of  JJetu  JerScp  | 

Countp  of  (Essex  ) 

MILLER  REUSE  HUTCHISON  .  HJe  n*,oJ,£  nnl”Cb 
petitioner,  being  buhj  Stnorn,  beposes  anb  saps  that  Ije  is  a  citijen  of  tije  tHniteb 
States,  anb  a  resibent  Of  v/est  Orange ,  Essex  County,  New  Jersey 


tfjat  ije  berily  beliebes  himself  to  be  tije  original,  first  anb  sole  inbentor  of  the 
improbements  in 

CHARGING  SECONDARY  CELLS  AND  UTILIZING  THE  CURRENT 
THE?.  EEROM 


bescribeb  anb  claiineb  in  tije  annexeb  specification ;  tljat  Ije  boes  not  knob)  anb 
boes  not  beliebe  tljat  tije  same  loas  eber  fenobm  or  useb  before  Ijis  inbention  or 
biscoberp  thereof ;  or  patenteb  or  bescribeb  in  anp  printeb  publication  in  tije 
tHniteb  States  of  America  or  anp  foreign  countrp  before  Ijis  inbention  or 
biscoberp  thereof,  or  more  tljan  tbio  pears  prior  to  this  application;  or  patenteb 
in  anp  countrp  foreign  to  tije  tHniteb  States  on  an  application  fileb  more  tljan 
tluelbe  months  prior  to  this  application;  or  in  public  use  or  on  sale  in  tije 
tHniteb  States  for  more  than  ttoo  pears  prior  to  tljis  application;  anb  tljat  no 
application  for  patent  upon  saib  inbention  IjnS  been  fileb  bp  him  ov  fcis  lesnl 
representatibes  or  assigns  in  anp  foreign  countrp. 


Sbjorn  to  anb  subscribeb  before  me  this  »2  £“bap  of 


'Jiotarp  public. 


[Seal] 


department  of  the  interior 
UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 

Washington  January  11,  1^12. 


Hiller  R.  Hutohiaon, 

o/o  Frank  L.  Dyer,  Wa.k  ."IP  ' 

Orange ,  H .  J  • 

.  ,  .  ,  mannmii  cation  from  iho  EXAMINER  in  charge  of  your  application. 


Dlviaion  la  r.quir.d  In  thl.  on..  »•«•••»  eW1”“  1  *° 
lnolualva,  *Uk  oov.r  an  all.d.d  ~tMd  of  .damme  »*”"«• 

,  nation...  olnl».  0.  7.  0  to  14.  lnoln.lv..  *l.h  an.  drain,  to  an 
apparatu.  for  cdarelne  .M>  '»««*••.  »•  ”M0”  0,,V*" 

raaroly  a  op.oifi.  fora  "f  »«*»»  “d  01“”°  “  ”  2“> 

lnolualva.  nnlol,  oov.r  an  all.s.d  «tW  and  apparatu.  of  utlllalne 

■battery  current. 

pnrthar  a.tl.n  on  tk.  n.rlt.  1.  P.-W-d  until  thla  r.,ulra- 
ment  shall  have  been  complied  with. 

As  the  result  of  a  curBory  examination  the  patents  to: 
^King.  653^093,  July  3,  1900.  ^^.J"'**** 

^  Pliok,  370,°134,  Sep.  20,  1887,  (204-29), 


XH  THE  united  states  patent  op pice 


Miller  Reese  Hutohison 

CHARGING  SECONDARY  CELLS  AND 
UTILIZING  THE  CURRENT  .HEREFROM 

Piled  September  20,  1911 
Serial  No.  651,697 


HONORABLE  COMMISSIONER  OP  PATENTS, 

SIR: 

In  response  to  the  Offioe  aotion  of 
January  11,  1912,  please  amend  the  above  entitled  oase  as 


4 


Page  4,  line  9,  oanoel  "utilizing  ourrent  by". 
Same  line,  ohange  "it"  to  -  ourrent  -  .  Same  page,  line 
20,  before  "groups"  insert  -  separate  -  . 

Page  10,  oanoel  lines  17  to  20  inolusivo  and _ 

substitute  therefor  the  following  -  jlfter  the  battery  has 
been  charged,  ourrent  may  be  tahen  from  it  and  utilized  by 
olosing  all  of  the  switches  5,  11.  17  and  23,  and  oonneot- 
ing  the  terminals  3  and  4  to  a  oirouit  oontaining  suitable 

translating  -  .  _ _ _ 

Substitute  the  following  olaims  for  those  now  in 


'■a\ 


the  application:  - 

X.  The  method  of  charging  a  secondary  cell,  whioh 
oonsists  in  supplying  ourrent  to  some  of  the  positive  and 
negative  elements  of  the  oell  during  one  period  and  to¬ 
other  positive  and  negative  elements  during  another  period 
substantially  as  set  forth. 


(1) 


2.  Tho  method  of  oharging  a  battery  of  secondary 

gens,  which  consists  in  supplying  current  simultaneously 
to  some  of  the  elements  of  each  coll  during  one  period,  and 
supplying  current  simultaneously  to  other  elements  of  each 
cell  during  another  period,-  substantially  as  set  forth.  | 

3.  The  method  of  oharging  a  secondary  ooll,  which 
consists  in  supplying  current  successively  to  groups  of 
elemontB  of  the  cell,  substantially  as  set  forth. 

4.  The  method  of  oharging  a  battery  of  secondary, 
cells,  which  consists  in  supplying  current  through  differ¬ 
ent  paths  through  the  cells  during  different  periods,  each 
path  including  positive  and  negative  elements  of  each  cell, 
substantially  as  set  forth. 

5.  The  combination  of  a  sub-divided  secondary  oell 
and  jnoans  for  supplying  current  to  any  desired  sub-division 
of  tho  oell,  substantially  as  described. 

!  6.  The  combination  of  a  battery  of  sub-divided 

|  secondary  oollB,  connections  between  sub-diviBions  of 
different  oells,  and  moans  for  supplying  ourrent  to  any 
desired  set  of  connected  sub-divisions,  substantially  as 
!  desoribod. 

I  v.  The  combination  of/seoondury  oell  having  groups 

of  elements,  each  group  being  provided  with  terminals,  and 
means  for  connecting  each  group  of  elements  in  a  separate 
oirouit,  substantially  as  described. 

8.  The  combination  of  a  secondary  oell  having  its 
elements  arranged  in  groups,  and  a  separate  circuit  for 
leach  group  of  elements,  substantially  as  described. 


19.  Ho  combination  of  a  bottory  of  ooooniany  oollo, 
oaob  ..11  havinG  It.  olomonta  arnancoi  la  e™-P».  and  ..ana 
whoreby  o.panat.  oiroait.  »y  b.  moooo.iv.ly  o.tabltohad. 
oaob  oaid  oiroait  oontominB  a  droop  of  olomonta  of  oaoh 
oell,  substantially  as  dosoribod. 

10.  ae  combination  of  a  battery  of  secondary  sells, 
each  oell  baring  its  elements  arranged  in  groups,  a  source 
of  current,  and  moans  for  connecting  in  circuit  with  the 
source  of  current  one  or  more  groups  of  elements  of  each 
oell.  substantially  aB  described. 

11.  The  method  of  discharging  a  secondary  oell, 
which  consists  in  taking  current  from  some  of  the  positive 
;  and  negative  elements  of  the  cell  during  one  period,  and 
J  from  other  positive  and  negative  elomonts  during  another 
■  period,  substantially  as  sot  forth.  j 

X{  12.  The  method  of  discharging  a  battery  of  secondary 
J  MllBf  which  consists  in  taking  current  simultaneously  from 

Isome  of  the  elements  of  each  cell  during  one  period,  and  in 
talcing  current  simultaneously  from  other  elements  of  each 
oell  during  another  period,  substantially  as  Bet  forth. 

13.  The  method  of  discharging  a  secondary  coll,  J 

which  consists  in  taking  current  successively  from  groups 
of  elements  of  the  cell,  substantially  as  set  forth. 

14.  The  mothod  of  diBoharging  a  battery  of  secondary 
cells,  which  consists  in  taking  current  from  the  cells  | 

through  different  paths  through  the  cells  during  different 
periods,  each  path  including  positive  and  negative  elements 
of  each  oell,  substantially  as  Bet  forth. 


(3) 


16.  The  combination  of  a  sub-divided  secondary  cell, 
and  means  for  taking  and  utilizing  ourront  from  any  desired 
sub-division  of  the  oell,  substantially  as  described. 

16.  The  combination  of  a  hattory  of  Bub -divided 
secondary  colls,  oonnootions  between  sub-divisions  of 
different  oells,  ana  moans  for  taking  and  utilising  current 
from  any  dosirea  Bet  of  oonnooted  sub-divisions,  substan¬ 
tially  as  aosoribod. 


|  17.  The  combination  of  a  battory  of  secondary  oells, 

;  eaoh  oell  having  its  olements  arranged  in  groups,  a  trans- 
|  lating  dovioe,  and  means  for  connecting  in  oirouit  with  the 
\  translating  devioo  one  or  more  groups  of  eloments  of  eaoh 
'|  oell,  substantially  as  described. 

18.  The  combination  of  a  battery  of  secondary  oells, 
eaoh  ooll  having  its  elements  arranged  in  groups,  an  eleo- 
trioal  dovioe,  and  moans  for  oonneoting  in  oirouit  with 
said  devioe  any  desired  number  of  groups  of  eloments  of 
|  eaoh  oell,  substantially  as  desoribed. 


19.  The  combination  of  a  battory  of  secondary  oells, 
eaoh  ooll  having  its  elements  arranged  in  groups,  a  source 
of  ourront ,  a  translating  devioe ,  and  meanB  for  oonneoting 
in  oirouit  with  either  the  souroe  of  ourrent  or  the  trans¬ 
lating  devioe  any  desired  number  of  groups  of  elemontB  df 
eaoh  oell,  substantially  as  doBoribed. 

REMARKS 


The  olaims  have  been  rewritten  for  the  purpose 
of  better  defining  applicant's  invention  and  in  partial'- com- 


I  plionoe  with,  tho  requirement  of  divioion.  In  the  Offioe 
j  notion  of  January  11,  1912,  division  was  required  between 
groupB  of  olaims  oovoring  subjeot  matter  as  follows: - 

(a)  Method  of  charging  storage  batteries 

(b)  Apparatus  for  charging  storage  batteries 

(o)  A  speoifio  form  .of.  battery  ooll 

(d)  Method  and  apparatus  for  utilizing  battery 
ourrent 

In  the  claims  now  submitted  there  is  no  olaim  for  a  stor¬ 
age  battery  ooll  per  se.  It  is  believed  that  the  olaims 
|  now  presented  are  properly  examinable  in  a  single  applica¬ 
tion.  All  of  the  apparatus  olaims  road  upon  the  single 
|  figure  of  the  drawing  and  some  of  then,  for  example,  olaims 
|  7,  8,  9,  18  and  19,  oovor  systems  adapted  for  either  oharg- 
ing  or  discharging  a  ooll  or  battery  or  for  both.  fhe 
apparatus  olaimed  is  adapted  for  oarrying  out  either  the 
proooss  of  oharging  a  oell  or  battery  or  for  discharging 
I  a  oell  or  battery  or  for  both.  furthermore,  it  is  belioved 
that  the  requirement  of  division  between  olaims  for  the 
method  of  oharging  storage  batteries  and  for  the  apparatus 
adapted  for  use  for  that  purpose  1b  not  a  proper  one,  be- 
!  oauso  of  the  relation  between  the  prooess  and  apparatus, 
i  In  this  oonneotion  referenoo  is  made  to  Steinmotz  vs.  . Allen, 

I  109  O.S.,  549,  in  whioh  the  Supreme  Court  held  that  the 
statute  gives  the  right  to  join  inventions  in  one  applica¬ 
tion  in  oases  where  the  inventions  are  related,  the  particu¬ 
lar  oase  under  consideration  being  an  application  containing 
both  prooess  and  apparatus  olaims.  In  a  subsequent  deoision 
by  the  Commissioner  of  Patents.,  Ex  parte  Ament,  116'  O.G.  , 


(5) 


596,  it  was  held  that  prooesa  and  apparatus  olaims  may  in 
some  oases  be  so  related  as  to  make  it  proper  to  include 
them  in  one  application,  that  a  requirement  of  division 
should  not  be  based  upon  the  broad  and  general  proposition 
that  the  prooess  and  apparatus  are  always  independent,  and 
that  if  the  Examiner  should  oonoludo  that  the  particular 
prooess  and  particular  apparatus  under  consideration  are 
not  so  related  as  to  warrant  including  them  in  one  oase, 
ho  should  state  his  reasons  for  this  oonolusion.  Further¬ 
more,  in  ex  parte  Steinmeta,  117  0.  6.,  901,  where  the 

Steinmeta  application  was  again  under  consideration,  the 
Commissioner  said:-  "The  sole  question  presented  for  de¬ 
cision  is  whether  the  subjeot  matter  stated  in  the  prooess 
olaims  is  so  separate  and  independent  of  the  subjeot  matter 
stated  in  tho  apparatus  olaims  as  to  warrant  requiring  that 
the  olaims  be  presented  in  soparate  applications".  It  is 
also  believed  that  the  field  of  search  and  classification 
is  the  same  for  all  of  the  olaimB  now  in  this  application. 
Reconsideration  of  the  requirement  of  division  insofar  as 
it  relates  to  the  subjeot  matter  of  tho  olaims  now  sub¬ 
mitted,  and  action  on  the  merits  are  requested. 

Respeotfully  submitted, 

HILLER  REESE  HUTCHISON 

His  Attorney 

Orange,  Hew  Jersey 
January  6,  1913.  • 


D1V..-28—  Room... 106 


VCO 

DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 
UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 
WASHINGTON 


Frank  1.  Eyer, 

. Orange,--- . 

Hew  Jersey, 


Please  find,  below  a  communication  from  the  EXAMINER  in  charge' of  the  application  of 

Ulller.Il. -Bit  ohlson,. -Serial— Ho-^-.fiSlr697,..X.iled..Sapt,-2ar-1911, . 

....fer.  Charging-Secondarsr..Oells-and-Utilizing.-the -Current-Therofrom,-. 


In  response  to  amendment  of  Jan,  7,  1913, 

It  does  not  seem  to  the  examiner  that  there  is  suoh  an 
intimate  relation  between  the  method  and  apparatus  claims  in 
this  oase  that  they  should  be  permitted  to  stand  in  a  single 
application.  In  this  conneotion  applicant's  attention  is 
direoted  to  the  decision  in  ex  parte  McMahon.  48  0,  0,,  255, 
Consequently,  division  is  required  between  claims  1  to  4,  con¬ 
stituting  one  set,  claims  5  to  10  and  15  to  19,  constituting 
another  set,  and  claims  11  to  14,  constituting  a  third  set. 


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Edison  Storage  Battery  Co. 


Orange,  N.J.,U.S.A. 

i  KS3«i2*A 


;  J.  ^/m^x/uML^  -,]  Mm  Str*  ***  I 

7Jn>J  OUjL 


The  attaohed  drawing  is  a  part  of  an  application  about 
to  be  filed  for  an  invention  of  Mr.  Hutchison's  relating  to  oharg- 
ing  secondary  cells  and  utilizing  the  current  therefrom.  Will 
you  kindly  sign  this  drawing.  Mr.  Hutchison  has  assigned  the 
United  States  rights  in  this  invention  to  the  Storage  Battery  Co. 
and  the  foreign  rights  to  Mr.  Edison.  Mr.  Hutchison  is  of  the 
opinion  that  foreign  applications  ought  to  be  filed  on  this  in¬ 
vention.  Perhaps  it  would  be  well  to  postpone  a  consideration  of 
this  matter  until  we  have  reoeived  the  first  Patent  Offioe  aotion. 


January  18,  1912. 


Mr .  Dyer : 

I  hand  you  herewith  an  application  of  Mr.  Hutchison's 
for  Charging  Secondary  Cells  and  Utilising  the  Current  Therefrom, 
Folio  785,  assigned  to  the  Edison  Storage  Battery  Company-  The 
first  Office  action  in  this  case  is  a  requirement  for  division, 
and  two  references  are  cited  as  the  result  of  a  cursory  examina¬ 
tion.  The  invention  is  not  disclosed  in  either  of  these  refer¬ 
ences.  Mr.  Hutchison  recommends  that  foreign  applications  be 
filed  on  this  invention  in  the  following  countries:  England, 

France,  Germany,  Italy,  Russia,  Japan,  Argentine,  Brazil  and 
Chile. 

Please  advise  me  what  you  wish  done  in  this  matter. 


February  2,  1912. 


I  have  your  memo  2038-A,  of  February  1,  enclos¬ 
ing  memo  from  Lanahau,  in  the  matter  of  Foreign  Patents 
for  charging  secondary  cells,  and  utilizing  the  current 
therefrom,  Folio  785. 


This  invention  is  of  especial  value  on  sub¬ 
marines  and  electric  locomotives.  Especially  does  this  ob¬ 
tain  in  submarines,  because  there  we  have  great  difficulty 
in  cooling  the  cells  when  charging  rapidly.  Of  necessity, 
the  size  of  the  air  intake  and  outlet  pipes,  for  ventilat¬ 
ing  and  cooling,  are  small,  owing  to  the  difficulty  of 
occluding  such  a  passage,  if  of  considerable  diameter,  to 
prevent  ingress  of  water,  when  submerged. 


In  this  patent,  1  divide  each  cell  into  several 
groups,  and  treat  each  group  separately.  That  is,  suppos¬ 
ing  we  have  an  S-20,  consisting  of  twenty  positive  plates. 
This  cell  would  be  made  up  in  two  groups  of  ten  positives 
and  eleven  negatives  to  each  group,  having  their  respect¬ 
ive  binding  posts,  but  both' groups  submerged  in  the  same 
electrolyte.  All  of  No.  1  groups  are  connected  together 
in  series,  and  all  of  No .  2  groups  are  connected  together 
in  series.  Naturally,  when  charging  at  a  high  rate,  or  in 
fact,  at  normal  rate,  in  Tropical  waters,  the  greater 
radiating  surface  per  ampere  passing  through  the  cell, 
the  more  effectually  will  the  cells  be  cooled.  It  is  there¬ 
fore  evident  that  by  charging  all  of  the  No.  1  groups 
first,  and  following  by  a  charge  of  No.  2  groups  after¬ 
ward,  we  have  a  very  flexible  arrangement. 


The  use  of  lead  storage  batteries  in  submarines 
is  attended  by  much  difficulty  in  cooling,  and  this  in¬ 
vention  is  applicable  to  lead  cells  as  well  as  to  Edison 
cells.  The  fact  that  it  has  not  before  been  patented  gives 
us  a  very  excellent  opportunity  of  shutting  out  the  lead 
cell,  and  inasmuch  as  the  use  of  large  units  in  submar¬ 
ines  is  increasing  rapidly,  and  South  American  Countries 
are  entering  very  energetically  into  the  construction  of 
submarines,  I  deem  it  very  important  that  we  patent  this 
feature  in  all  Countries  of  any  importance. 

Another  interesting  feature  of  this  invention 
is  the  ability  to  discharge  the  cells  one  group  at  a  time. 
Supposing  a  submarine  goes  out  for  a  practice  rim.  She 
uses  only  No.  1  groups,  and  when  she  returns,  charges 
that  one  group  up.  In  the  event  of ' unforeseen  conditions 
arising,  she  has  No.  2  group  always  fully  charged.  This 
makes  the  boat  more  flexible  in  maneouvering,  as  she  can 


February  13 ,  1912. 


Mr.  Dyer 

The  Submarine  Cell  patents  have  not,  as  yet,  bean 

prepared. 

We  are  taking  big  chances. 

1  am  called  upon  to  furnish  detail  working  drawings 
to  the  Wellman-Seaver-Morgan  Company,  and  to  the  United  States 
Gov erhment  on  this  new  pontoon  crane  battery,  in  which  X  will 
use  S-6  cells.  Construction  cannot  be  started  on  the  batteries 
'until  the  drawings  have  been  approved  by  the  Navy  Department. 

X  do  not  dare  to  forward  the  drawings  until  the  patents  have 
been  put  into  the  office,  because  I  have  no  way  of  determin¬ 
ing  as  to  who  will  see  them  after  they  leave  our  Works. 

I  also  do  not  think  the  Foreign  pa  tents  have  been 
applied  for,  for  this  method  of  dividing  the  elements  of 
a  cell  into  groups.  This  is  very,  important,  as  I  am  describing 
this  feature  to  several  Foreign  Governments.  Have  to  do  it. 
This  Submarine  Battery  matter  has  been  in  preparation  now 
for  a  year  and  one-half,  and  I  want  to  see  some  results 
come  into  that  Factory. 

I-  trust  you  will  facilitate  the  patent  end  as 
much  as  possible,  and  thereby  greatly  oblige, 


Q'V-C'C  c~e-^ 


Urecc- 


February  15, 


1912. 


Mr.  Dyer:- 


In  reply  to  your  memo  herewith,  patents  in  the  follow¬ 
ing  oountries  will  oost  as  follows 


First  Cost 


—  Great  Britain-  fl* 

—  Germany 

—  Franoe 

—  Italy 
Russia 

—  Japan 
Argentine 

—  Brazil 
!hili 


Before  expiration 


§670.00 
1785.00 
800.00 
649.00 
1680.00 
.  375.00 
635.00 
890.00 
250.00 


J.  3  £  T' 

In  the  past  we  have  taken  out  patents  in  Japan, 
Argentine,  3razil  and  Chili  through  Van  Oldenneel,  and  I  have 
taken  the  oost  from  his  prioe  list,  but  I  find  that  KarksS:  Clerk’s 
(Hew  York)  prioe  list  is  considerably  lower.  If  it  is  correot, 
we  oan  have  them  attend  to  the  filing  of  the  applications  and 
save  about  §145.00.  fj  j, 

F.  3)1  /ilewis 

L-S 


tyW  nt  t 


. 7  \ 

February  21,  1912. 

Mr.  Hutchison 

'  In  the  matter  of  your  inventions  on  the  submarine 

cell,  Mr.  Dyer  has  instructed  me  to  prepare  a  single  United 
States  application  including  all  of  the  features  of  this  cell, 
and  to  defer  the  matter  of  foroign  applications  on  this  con¬ 
struction  until  after  the  filing  of  the  United  States  application. 


HD-JS 

C'JlL  4- 


Ootober  3,  1912. 


Mr.  Dyer:- 

V/e  have  three  patents  in  Japan  and  one  pending  ap¬ 
plication  -  all  on  storage  batteries. 


polio  87  -  Pour  years  to  run.  Tax  will  total  §115.00 
Polio  88  -  "  "  "  "  "  "  "  " 

Polio  182-  Seven  "  "  "  "  "  "  §185.00 

Pending  application  the  one  referred  to  in  Van  Oldenneel  bill. 


Polio  726  -  Providing  no  appeal  is  neoessary,  this  oase  will 
oost  us  before  expiration  §245.00  taxes  and  about  §100.00  for 
working  if  the  latter  is  done  by  advertising.  The  total,  in¬ 
cluding  first  oost  tax  and  working,  will  be  about  §468.00. 

The  above  inoludos  Van  Oldenneel’ s  services  whioh  are  about 
100$  above  actual  Patent  Offioe  fees. 


•V 

$ 


Argentine  Republio 

~  One  pending  application  on  Storage  Battery  (Hutohison 

oase  referred  to  in  Van  Oldenneel  bill).  Ten  years  -  §153.00  . 

-^Aax^  ^or  next  nine  years  at  §25.00  per  year  will  be  §225.00. 
Total  without  working  §378.00.  The  actual  government  fee  for 
tax  is  about  §5.00.  If  we  oould  arrange  to  pay  it  ourselves 
it  will  bring  the  total  tax  down  to  §45.00.  (Mr.  Kennedy  is 
looking  into  the  matter) 


Brazil 

One  pending  application  on  Storage  Battery  (Hutohison 
oase  referred  to  in  Van  Oldenneel  bill)  Fifteen  years  -  §184.50. 
Taxes  will  amount  to  §675.50  -  total  §860.00  Van  Oldenneel  charge. 


PRESIDENT’S  OFFICE 
Memorandum 


October  7,  19X2. 


Mr.  Lewis: 

Referring  to  the  attached  memorandum,  is  Folio 
jjfa  '  jjlo.  726  the  Hutchison  Patent  in  Jar  an?/  Also  advise  me^if 
I  r^there  are  any  patents 

i,  I  taxes  are  payable. 

P1,T>/lYA7 


i  the  battery  in  Argentine 


I 


F.  L.  D. 


-V- 


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Uforfm  ktMr 


i'obruary  22, 


1913 


Kiss  laidlaw:- 

301,10  785  -  HU- CHIS01I 

Although  this  application  is  to  be  dropped,  please 
hoop  it  in  the  pending  files  until  it  becomes  abandoned,  inas¬ 
much  as  it  may  be  of  interest  in  connection  with  the  applica¬ 
tion  on  submarine  cells  to  be  filed  in  Mr.  Hutchison's  name. 


Patent  Series 


Patent  Application  Files 


Folio#  794  Kinetoscope 

U.S.  Patent#:  1204424 

Primary  Applicant:  Gall,  Adolph  F 


Date  Executed:  10/9/1911 


.  1  '“7 —  V^/^Vv^  ^-' 

lj-  I  sens' you  herewith  the  papers  in  allowed/ application  . 

Folio  794  relating  to  the  Home  P.  K.  ^ 

\?\£>  S  The  claimB  which  were  allowed  in  this  application  cover 

&  ^  / 

A  5*  vj  oniy  the  film  shifting  ana  feeding  meohanism  shown  in  Figs .  6 
■vf\s  .  J  and  iLl  to  15  of  the  drawings  in  the  application. 

•  7$  £  \ Js^ne  following  four  sets  of  claims,  each  set  relating 

t  v  $o  a  different  feature  of  the  machine,  were  canceled  from  the 
|  ^  ^^priginal  specification  in  compliance  with  a  requirement  for 
^  ^  division  hy  the  Patent  office 

i-4  jls 

X  .  1.  Original  claims  19  to  22  covering  the  means  for 

'  W  <K 

£  %  tensioning  ana  holding  the  film  flat  while  passing  projecting 

position,  which  means  is  shown  in  Figs-.  9,  11,  20  and  21  of  the 
^  3  Cr" irawings  in  the  application. 

3  t$_  2.  Original  claims  24  to  27  inclusive  covering  the 

A — ^  film  winding  means,  which  means  is  shown  in  Figs.  7,  8,  18  and 

^  \A  19  of  the  drawings  in  the  application. 

3.  Original  claims  38  and  39  covering  the  lens 
~J  \  mounting  or^Sto^device,  which  is  shown  in  Figs.  3  and  4  of  the 

5  \  drawings  of  the  application  and  which  comprises  the  parts  numbered 


Claims  40  to  42  inclusive  < 


raring  the  lamp  house 


mounting,  which  is  shown  in  Figs.  2,  16  and  17  of  the  drawings 
of  the  application. 


-2- 

There  are  two  questions  to  be  decided;  First,  do 
you  oonsider  the  invention  covered  by  the  allowed  claims  of 
the  present  application  of  sufficient  importance  to  warrant 
taking  out  the  patent?  This  will  involve  a  payment  of  $20.00 
for  the  final  Government  fee.  Second,  do  you  wish  a  divisional 
application  or  applications  filed  on  the  subjeot  matter  covered 
by  any  of  the  four  sets  of  claims  enumerated  above.  In  con¬ 
nection  with  the  latter  question,  your  attention  is  directed  to 
the  fact  that  should  you  decide  that  it  is  advisable  to  file 
a  divisional  application  or  applications,  the  same  must  be 
filed  before  the  payment  of  the  final  fee  on  the  allowed  appli¬ 
cation,  which  fee  is  due  October  17,  1916. 

Please  advise. 

G. 

wh-js 


Patent  Series 


Patent  Application  Files 


Folio  #  801  Cement  Kilns 

Serial  #:  655902 

Primary  Applicant:  Edison,  Thomas  A 


Date  Executed:  10/16/1911 


Serial 


petition 


®o  tlje  Commissioner  ot  patents: 

gour  petitioner  thomas  a.  Edison 

a  citijen  of  tfje  ©niteb  States,  resibing  anb  fjabing  a  $ost  ©ffice  abbress  at 
Llewellyn  Park,  West  Orange,  Essex  County,  flow  Jersey 


praps  tfjat  letters  patent  map  be  granteb  to  Ijim  for  tfje  improbements  in 


UKMF.NT  KILNS 


Set  fortlj  in  tfje  annexeb  specification ;  anb  ije  Ijerebp  appoints  Jfranfe  3L  JBpcr 
(Registration  Mo.  560),  of  ©range,  J2eto  JerSep,  Ijis  attornep,  toitfj  full 
potoer  of  substitution  anb  rebocation,  to  prosecute  tljis  application,  to  ntafee 
alterations  anb  amenbments  tfjerein,  to  receibe  tlje  patent,  anb  to  transact  all 
business  in  tlje  patent  ©ffice  connected  tijeretuitb. 


SPECIFICATION 


TO  ALL  WHOM  IT  MAY  CONCERN: 

BE  IT  KNOW,  that  I,  THOMAS  A.  EDISON,  a  citizen 
of  the  United  States  and  a  resident  of  Llewellyn  Park, 

West  Orange,  Essex  County,  New  Jersey,  have  Invented 
certain  new  and  useful  improvements  in  CEMENT  KILNS, 
of  which  the  following  is  a  specif ication: - 

My  invention  relates  to  cement  kilns  of  the 
rotary  type  and  has  for  its  objects  methods  and  means  for 
improving  and  rendering  more  economical  the  operation  of 
such  kilns.  Hitherto  it  has  been  the  practioe  to  make  use 
of  eaBlly  combustible  materials,  such  as  gas,  oil,  or 
bituminous  coal,  as  fuel  for  heating  such  kilns.  The  fuel 
is  projected  into  the  lower  end  of  the  kiln  usually  by 
means  of  an  air  blast  and  ignited.  When  fuels  of  this 
character  are  used  for  this  purpose,  complete  combustion 
takes  pla,ce  very  rapidly,  and  the  high  temperature  flame 
produced  thereby  extends  only  a  limited  distance  into  the 
kiln.  As  a  result,  the  length  of  the  clinkering  zone  is 
limited  and  trouble  is  experienced  due  to  the  formation  of 
chalk  rings  or  accumulations  of  raw  material  where  the  raw 
material  enters  the  clinkering  zone.  By  employing  more 
difficultly. combustible  materials,  or  a  mixture  of  more 
easily  and  more  difficultly  combustible  materials,  the 
heat  in  the  kiln  is  extended  over  the  entire  area, arid  is 
somewhat  reduced  in  intensity,  and  the  clinkering  zone  is 


i  considerably  lengthened.  I  have  found  that  these 
:  advantageous  results  may  be  obtained  by  using  a  mixture  of 
;  pulverized  anthracite  and  bituminous  coals.  When  such  a 
ij  mixture  is  used,  the  bituminous  coal  ignites  almost  im- 
ij  mediately  upon  entering  the  kiln  and  supplies  sufficient 
Ij  heat  to  ignite  the  anthracite  coal,  which  burns  further 
ji  up  the  kiln,  forming  a  long  continuous  flame  of  high 
i:  temperature,  and  the  troubles  due  to  chalk  rings  hitherto 
|  experienced  are  materially  reduced.  The  clinkering  zone 
ji  is  considerably  lengthened,  and  its  outline  is  less  sharply 
|i  defined  than  when  using  bituminous  coal  straight,  and 
j|  greater  economy  of  operation  is  secured.  For  exanple,^ 
ij  it  has  been  found  that  by  employing  a  mixture  of  35^  ari- 
!|  thraoite  and  65^  bituminous,  about  10'/  more  clinker  may  be 
j!  burned  with  the  same  amount  of  ooal  than  when  using  bi- 
tuminous  coal  alone.  Furthermore,  by  my  invention,  the 
ij  lower  and  cheaper  grades  of  anthraoite  coal  may  be  utilized, 
i|  and  a  considerable  saving  of  expense  thus  effected.  When 
j|  using  a  mixture  of  anthracite  and  bituminous  coals,  I 
have  found  it  desirable  to  employ  an  auxiliary  oil  burner 
in  order  to  start  the  kiln  and  raise  it  to  a  clinkering 
|  temperature.  Where  a  very  large  percentage  of  pulverized 
anthraoite  coal  is  mixed  with  a  small  percentage  of  bitumin- 
oub  coal,  as  for  example,  a  mixture  of  78 /  anthracite  and 
28^  bituminous,  the  auxiliary  oil  burner  is  necessary 
not  only  when  starting  the  kiln,  but  also  in  caBe  the  heat 
becomes  reduced  due  to  a  stoppage  or  to  variations  in  the 
operation  of  the  kiln.  Wy  invention  consists  also  in  the 
provision  of  means  for  spreading  the  mixture  of  pulverized 
ij  coal  and  air  as  it  is  projected  into  the  kiln,  so  as  to  brea 
j|  up  the  column  of  ooal  and  air  in  such  a  manner  that  the 
heat  of  the  kiln  can  come  into  intimate  contact  with  it 

I  2 


|  and  cause  tho  ignition  of  the  pulverized  coal  to  take 
|  place  more  readily.  My  improved  spreading  device  ia 
|j  adjustable  so  that  a  greater  or  lens  distribution  of  the 
pulverized  coal  can  bo  obtained,  as  is  found  neoessary  or 
!!  desirable,  thus  changing  the  location  of  tho  heat  in  the 
!j  kiln. 

Ii  jn  order  that  my  invention  may  be  more  roadily 

:|  understood,  reference  is  had  to  the  drawings  accompanying 
j;  and  forming  part  of  this  specification,  and  in  which  -  j 

jj  Figure  1  ia  a  side  elevation  partly  in  section 

!  showing  a  rotary  kiln  provided  v/ith  fuel  feeding  apparatus 
|  aquippod  v/ith  my  improved  spreading  dovioe: 

\  Figures  2  and  3  are  side  and  plan  views  respect- 

|l  ively  of  ray  improved  spreading  device  applied  to  the  end 
j  of  a  fuel  supply  tube  or  pipe; 

|  Figure  4  is  a  side  elevation  partly  in  section 

j  showing  a  rotary  kiln  provided  v/ith  fuel  feeding  apparatus 
j!  and  v/ith  an  auxiliary  oil  burner;  and 

I  Figure  5  is  a  sectional  view  on  the  line  5-5  of 

Figure  4. 

!|  Referring  to  the  drawings  and.  particularly  to 

|  Figures  1,  2  and  3  thereof,  the  lower/ of  a  rotary  kiln  is 
jl  shown  at  1  opening  into  a  chamber  2  which  is  provided 
|  with  a  chute  3  for  directing  the  clinkered  material  into 
|  a  cooling  cylinder  4.  The  chamber  2  is  provided  with  an 
j|  opening  5  opposite  the  end  of  the  rotary  kiln.  Through 
j  the  opening  5  is  extended  the  end  of  a  fuel  supply  pipe 
|  6.  The  fuel  Bupply  pipe  6_  is  supplied  through  a  pipe  2. 
jj  froma  hopper  8  with  pulverized  fuel,  preferably  a  mixture 
ji  of  pulverized  anthracite  and  "bituminous  coals,  and  is 
j  supplied  with  air  under  pressure  through  a  pipe  9  which 
S  is  connected  to  any  suitable  means  for  supplying  the  com- 


5  pressed  air.  The  pipe  i  is  provided  with  a  valve  10,  and 
|  the  pipe  9  with  a  valve  11  for  controlling  the  supply  of 
i!  pulverized  fuel  and  air.  Any  other  suitable  means  may  be 
|  employed  for  this  purpose.  The  end  of  the  fuel  supply 
Jl  pipe  6  which  extends  into  the  ohamber  2  is  provided  with 
jj  a  a  ovine  18  for  spreading  tho  fuel  whioh  is  projected  from 
jl  the  pipe  6.  The  fuel  spreading  device  12  is  illustrated 
j  more  in  detail  in  figures  2  and  3  and  includes  a  sleeve  13 
lj  adjustably  mounted  upon  tho  pipe  6.  The  sleeve  13  has 
|  projections  or  extensions  14  and  15  extending  parallel  to 
|j  the  pipe  6  and  beyond  the  end  thereof.  Supported  by  the 
projections  14  and  15  is  a  oone-shaped  portion  16  having 
!  its  apex  turned  toward  the  opening  in  the  end  of  the  pipe 
6  and  looated  substantially  in  the  line  of  the  axis  of. the 
said  pipe.  The  fuel  spreading  device  12  may  be  adjusted 
by  moving  the  sleeve  13  along  the  pipe  6  so  as  to  vary  the 
i  distance  between  the  oone-shaped  portion  and  the  end  of  the 
pipe  and  thereby  oontrol  the  distribution  of  the  pulverised 
|  fuel  whioh  is  projected  from  the  fuel  supply  pipe  6. 
j  In  Figures  4  and  5  of  tho  drawings,  I  have  illus- 

||  trated  a  somewhat  modified  form  of  fuel  feeding  apparatus 
of  whioh  an  atixiliary  oil  burner  forms  a  part.  In  this 
j  modification  two  fuel  feeding  pipes  21  and  22  are  provided, 
having  their  ends  extending  into  the  ohamber  2  through  tho 
opening  6.  Eaoh  of  these  pipes  is  preferably  provided  with 
a  fuel  spreading  dovioe  12  similar  to  that  illustrated  in 
j  Figures  1,  2  and  3.  The  hopper  8  is  provided  with  two 
connecting  pipes  23  and  24  for  supplying  pulverized  fuel 
to  the  fuel  supply  pipeB  21  and  22  respectively.  Air  is 
supplied  to  the  pipes  21  and  22  from  any  convenient  source 
through  the  pipe  9.  Valves  11'  may  be  provided  in  the 


i  pipes  21  ana  22  and '.valves  lO’’  in  the  pipes  23  and  24  for 
|  controlling  the  supply  of  pulverized  fuel  and  air.  An 
I  auxiliary  oil  burner  25.  whio11  may  b0  oonveni0ntly  l0_ 
j  oated  between  the  two  pipes  21  and  22  is  provided  for 

starting  the  kiln  and  raising  it  to  a  clinkering  heat,  and 
|  aiso  in  oase  the  heat  beoomes  reduoed,  due  to  stoppage  or 
j  variations  in  the  operation  of  the  kiln.  The  oil  burner 
I  25  is  supplied  with  oil  from  any  convenient  souroe  through 
|  the  pipe  26  and  the  oonneotion  27.  The  oil  burner  may 
|i  be  supplied  with  air  through  the  pipe  9  ana  the  flexible 
j  connection  28.  A  valve  89  is  . provided  for  controlling  the  | 
oil  supply  and  a  valve  30  for  controlling  the  supply  of 
j  air  to  the  oil  burner.  The  oil  burner  25  is  detaohably 
connected  to  the  connection  27  and  the  connection  28  is 
|  made  of  flexible  material  in  order  to  enable  the  oil  burn¬ 
er  to  be  removed  from  the  opening  5  after  the  kiln  has  been 
started  or  when  not  otherwise  needed. 

Having  now  described  my  invention,  what  X  claim 
and  desire  to  protect  by  letters  Patent  of  the  United  Statej 


|  "1.  A  method  hf  heating's  ro'tary  oemant  kiln,  which 

1  consists^  projecting  into  the  kiln  a  pulverized  mixture 
|  of  easily  and  difficultly  combustible  fuels,  and  igniting 
j  the  same,  substantially  as  set  forth. 

2.  A  method  of  heating  a  rotary  cement  kiln,  which 
consists  in  projecting  intoNhe  kiln  a  mixture  of  finely 
j  divided  anthracite  and  bituminous  coals,  and  igniting  the 

Isame,  substantially  as  set  forth.  \ 

3.  a  method  of  heating  a  rotary  cement.,  kiln,  which 

I  5  ■ 


Ij  oonsiata  in  pro, looting  into  tho  lower  ond  of  tho  Jciln  a 
|j  stream  composed  of  a  mixture  of  air  and  pulverised  easily 

I!  \  . 

|  and  difficultly  combustible  fuels,  and  igniting  the  same, 
ij  substantially  as  set  forth.  / 


A  method  of  heating  a  rotary  oement  kiln,  which 
s  in  proj  ecting  into  the  lower  end  of  the  kiln  a 


|]  stream  composed  of  a  mixture  of  air  and  anthracite  and 
jj  hituminous  coals,  and  .igniting  the  same,  substantially 
•!  as  set  forth. 

I  8.  A  method  of  heating  a  rotary  oement  kiln,  which 

jj  consists  in  projooting  into  the  lower  end  of  the  kiln 
Ij  pulverized  fuel,  and  spreading' arid  igniting  the  same, 
ji  substantially  as  set  forth , 

6.  A  method  of  heating  a  rotary  cement  kiln,  which 
consists  in  projecting  into  the  lower  end  bf  the  kiln  a 
pulverized  mixture  of  easily  and  difficultly scombustible 
fuels,  and  in  spreading  and  igniting  the  same,  substantial¬ 
ly  as  set  forth. 


7.  A  method  of  heating  a  rotary  oement  kiln,\which 
consists  in  projecting  into  the  lower  end  of  the  kiln^a 
mixture  of  pulverized  anthracite  and  bituminous  coals,  and 
spreading  and  igniting  the  name,  substantially  as  set 

8.  in  cement  burning  apparatus,  the  combination 
with  a  rotary  kiln,  of  means  for  supplying  pulverized 
fuel  to  the  same,  the  said  fuel  supplying  means  being 
provided  with  means  for  spreading  the  fuel,  substantially 


as  described. 


I  '9.'  in  cement  burning  apparatus,  the  combination  with  I  y 
a  rotary  kiln.  of  means  for  supplying  pulverised  fuel  to 
the  same,  the  saia  fuel  supplying  means  being  provided  with 
adjustable  means  for  spreading  the  fuel,  substantially  as 
8  desoribed. 

||  10.  Means  for.  supplying  pulverized  fuel  to  a  rotary  r 

jj  oement  kiln,  including  a  fuel  supply  pipe  and  a  fuel  sproad- 
ing  devioe  mounted  thereon,  substantially  as  desoribed. 


|  li.  Means  for  supplying  pulverized  fuel  to  a  rotary  (.y  ■ 

!  oement  kiln,  inoluding  a  fuel  supply  pipe  ana  a  fuel  spread- 
|  ing  device  adjustably  mounted  thereon,  substantially  as 
I  aesorihea. 

\  y 

j|  12.  Means  for  supplying  pulverizea  fuel  to  a  rotary 

|  oement  kiln,  inoluding  a  fuel  supply  pipe  and  a  fuel  spread- 
j  mg  device  mounted  in  operative  relation  to  the  end  of  the 
jj  said  pipe,  and  having  a  tapered  portion  adjustable  to  and 
1  from  the  opening  of  the  said  pipe,  substantially  as  de- 

Isoribed. 

'13.  In  oement  burning  apparatus,  the  oombination  with 
a  rotary  kiln,  of  means  for  heating  the  same,  comprising 
|  means  for  projecting  pulverized  fuel  into  the  kiln,  and 
I  an  auxiliary  heating  means,  substantially  as  desoribed. 

14.  In  oement  burning  apparatus,  the  oombination 
,  j  with  a  rotary  kiln,  of  means  for  heating  the  same,  oom- 
|i  prising  means  for  projecting  pulverized  fuel  into  the  kiln. 

|!  and  an  oil  burner,  substantially  aB  described. 

15..  in  oement  burning  apparatus,  the  oombination 
with  a  rotary  kiln,  of  means  for  heating  the  same,  oom- 
prising  means  for  projecting  pulverized  fuel  into  the  kiln 


\ 


ana  spreading  the  same,  ana  an  auxiliary  heating  means, 
substantially  as  aesoribea. 

16.  In  oement  burning  apparatus,  the  oombination 
with  a  rotary  kiln,  of  means  for  heating  the  same,  oom- 
prising  adjustable  means  for  projecting  pulverized  fuel  in¬ 
to  the  kiln  and  spreading  the  same,  and  an  auxiliary  heat¬ 
ing  means,  substantially  aB  aesoribea. 

17.  In  oement  burning  apparatus,  the  oombination 
with  a  rotary  kiln,  of  moans  for  heating  the  same,  com¬ 
prising  means  for  projecting  pulverized  fuel  into  the  kiln 
and  spreading  the  same,  ana  an  oil  burner,  substantially 
as  described. 

'3! Id.  In  oement '  burning  apparatus,  the  oombination 

with  a  rotary  kiln,  of  means  for  heating  the  same,  com¬ 
prising  adjustable  means  for  projecting  pulverized  fuel 
into  the  kiln  and  spreading  the  same,  and  an  oil  burner, 
substantially  as  described. 

19..  In  oement  burning  apparatus,  the  combination 
with  a  rotary  kiln,  of  means  for  heating  the  same,  com¬ 
prising  means  for  projecting  pulverized  fuel  into  the  kiln 
and  means  for  spreading  the  same,  said  means  being  independ- 
|  ently  adjustable,  substantially  as  described. 


®ljiss  specification  Signet)  nnt)  boitneSSeb  iljis  '^ba?  0f^-^-l9l ( 

\TCsD-4  .  $  (£&&-' 


WS&itncmti): 

X  .3L* 


.*L 


r:!,fc/ . 


2.  (/P: 


®atb. 


g>tate  of  J?ctu  Jersey  [ 

Count?  of  Cssex  ) 

,  tijc  abobe  natneb 

petitioner,  being  bulif  Otuorn,  foeposteg  anb  stop#  tljat  ije  is  a  citizen  of  tijc  iHntteo 
states,  anb  a  resibent  Of  IilaWBllyn  P(lrlCi  west  Orange.  Essex  County 
Hew  Jersey 

tljat  ije  beriUj  belicbes  fjiinsclf  to  be  tijc  original,  first  anb  Sole  inbentor  of  tijc 
itnprobenients  in  . 

0  EMEUS'  KILNS 

beScribeb  anh  clauneb  in  tijc  annexeb  specification ;  tljat  Ije  boes  not  Unob)  anb 
boes  not  beliebe  tljat  tlje  same  boas  eber  Unolnn  or  useb  before  Ijis  inbention  or 
biscober?  thereof;  or  patenteb  or  beScribeb  in  an?  printeb  publication  in  tlje 
XHniteb  states  of  America  or  an?  foreign  countr?  before  ijis  inbention  or 
biscober?  tljereof,  or  more  tfjan  ttoo  ?ears  prior  to  tljis  application;  or  patenteb 
in  an?  countr?  foreign  to  tlje  Unitcb  states  on  an  application  fileb  more  tfjan 
ttoelbe  months  prior  to  tljis.  application;  or  in  public  use  or  on  sale  in  tlje 
Uniteb  States  for  more  tljan  ttuo  ?earS  prior  to  tljisf  application;  anb  tljat  no 
application  for  patent  upon  saib  inbention  IjaS  been  fileb  b?  him  or  fjte 
representatibes  or  assigns  in  an?  foreign  countr?. 

g>tuorn  to  anb  subscribeb  before  me  tljis  /t  ^  bn?  of  19 1  ' 

J2otar?  public. 


[ftcal] 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 


UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 


Orange ,  IT.  3. 


1‘lnaee  find  below  a  communication  from  tho  EXAMINER  in  oharge  of  your  application. 

for  Cement  Kilns,  filed  Oot.  21,  1911,  (Serial  ITo.  666,902. 


The  claims  in  this  case  cover  two  distinct  inventions  and 
division  is  accordingly  required. 

Claims  1  to  7 ,  inclusive,  cover  a  method  for  burning  pulver¬ 
ized  fuel  and  the  remaining  claims  covor  a  fuel  feeding  apparatus. 


by,  33  t 


&*rv-^. —  “tf-  CyfLyu^-' 

f3*  /2-7  U~~ 

X.*ML  9? 2.,  (*f  &  #4» 


/frf^t-**- 


o  ^  ^ 


Jliy^ko^cJU  -  p&-ir*~S 

/n. — yS-c-e-^1—  X-c- 


"c/ 


IN  THE  UNITED  STATES  PATENT  Oi’PICE 

Thomas  A.  Edison 
CEMENT  KIMS 
Piled  Ootober  21,  1911 
Serial  No.  665,902 

HONORABLE  COMMISSIONER  OP  PATENTS , 

SIR: 

In  response  to  the  Office  uotion  of 
November  25th,  1911,  please  amend  the  above  entitled  oase 
as  follows : - 

Canoel  olaims  1  to  7  inolusive  and  renumber  the 
remaining  olaims  as  1  to  12  inolusive. 

REMARKS 

Claims  1  to  7  have  been  oanoeled  in  response  to 
I  the  requirement  of  division.  Applicant  reserves  the  right 
j  to  file  a  divisional  application  covering  tho  subject  matter 
of  the  oanoeled  olaims. 

Aotion  on  the  merits  of  the  olaims  now  in  the 
oase  is  requested. 

P.eBpeotfully  submitted, 

THOMAS  A.  EDISON 

IBy  a-'w — _ 

His  Attorney 


Room  No.  236  .... 


Orange,  New  Jersey 
November  22,  1912 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 

UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 

WASHINGTON  December  17,  1912. 


Thomas  A.  Edison, 

Care  Frank  L.  Dyer, 
Orange ,  H .  J . 

Please  find,  below  a  communication  from 


for  Cement  KilnB,  filed  Oet.  21,  1911,  Serial  Ho.  6B5,902. 


_  Commissioner  of  Pnlcnts. 

This  oaoe  has  been  considered  as  amended  Hovember  23, 


Since  the  part  1  is  referred  to  aB  a  rotary  kiln  some 
means  should  be  shown  for  rotating  the  same. 

Claims  1-6  inclusive,  8,  9  and  12  are  rejected  on  the 


art  of  record,  particularly  Zell. 

Claims  7,  10  and  11  are.rojeoted  in  view  of  either 

Linhard,  969°, 169,  Sept.  6,  1910, Class  110-104;  or 

Sohutz,  836°,!^.  Hov.  20,  1906,  "  110-28. 


Larsen,  824,728,,-  July  3.  1906, Class 

Chapman,  32?°,7t7y  Hov. 3,  188b,  " 

JAangelsdorff ,977, 113, Hov.  29,1910,  " 

Wilson  et  al ,438^872, Oct.  21,1890,  " 

Leede,  292,236,  Jan.  22,  1884,  " 


110-104; 

158-118; 

110-104; 

110-22; 

110-22. 


TKe  Edison  Portland  Cement  Co.  /  i 


TnKA*-  .*■ '  P.  O.  ADDRESS. 

mV.  Thomap  Aj  Edison, 


s.  STEWARTSVILLE,  N.  J.  BAVA""AH■  DA 
July  24th,  191# 


/W 


foieon  Laboratory, 


I  have  a  letter  from  tho  Legal]  Department  asking^ 
for  information  in  regard  to  tho  Spreader  Gun^  burning  oil 
in  the  Kiln,  &o. ,  ana  the  following  are  present  conditions. 

I  thought  you  might  he  able  to  describe  to  the  Legal  De¬ 
partment  the  type  of  patent  whioh  would  be  moBt  advantageous. 

After  reading  this,  will  you  please  turn  it  over  to 
the  Legal  Department  with  suoh  comments  as  seem  to  you  neces¬ 


sary. 

In  burning  anthraoite  ooal  mixed  with  gas  ooal  we 
have  found  that  with  a  mixture  of  35#  anthracite  ana  66#  bi¬ 
tuminous,  we  are  able  to  burn  about  10#  more  olinker  with  the 
same  amount  of  ooal  than  we  could  when  using  the  gas  ooal 
straight.  We  attribute  this  to  the  fact  that  the  heat  in  the 
kiln  is  extended  over  a  longer  area  and  is  somewhat  less  in 
intensity  than  with  the  gas  ooal  straight,  aue  to  the  fact 
that  the  gaB  ooal  ignites  almost  immediately  upon  entering 
the  kiln  and  supplies  sufficient  heat  to  ignite  the  anthra- 
oito,  whioh  burns  further  up  the  kiln  making  a  long  continuous 
-1- 


-2- 


Mr.  Edison. 

flame  of  high  temperature.  By  this  meane  we  have  discovered 
that  there  is  very  muoh  less  trouble  from  chalk  rings  or  accumu¬ 
lations  of  raw  material  partially  cindered  as  the  raw  material 
enters  the  olinkering  zone,  and  the  olinker  zone  is  considerably 
lengthened  and  itB  outline  less  sharply  defined  than  when  using 
gaB  ooal  straight. 

When  using  this  mixture  of  anthraoite  and  gas  ooal,  it 
is  desirable  to  have  an  auxilliary  oil  burner  in  order  to  start 
the  kiln  and  get  it  into  a  olinkering  heat,  as  the  mixture  bums 
very  slowly  when  the  kiln  is  cold,  and  it  is  very  difficult  to 
get  the  heat  without  the  addition  of  oil. 

When  burning  a  larger  percentage  of  pulverized  anthra¬ 
oite  with  bituminous,  say  75$  anthraoite  and  25$  bituminous  or 
gas,  the  auxilliary  oil  burner  is  neoessary,  not  only  when 
starting  the  kiln,  but  also  in  case  the  heat  becomes  reduced  y 
due  to  stoppage  of  the  kiln  or  variations  in  the  operations.  " 

. 'it  has  also  been  found  desirable  and  neoessary  with 

I  a  higher  percentage  of  anthraoite,  say  from  50$  up,  to  use  a 
\  Spreader  on  the  pipe  injecting  the  mixture  of  pulverized  ooal 
gb  an a  air  into  the  kiln.  This  Spreader  breakB  up  the  column  of 
ooal  and  air  so  that  the  heat  of  the  kiln  oan  come  into  intimate 
oontaot  with  it  and  oause  the  ignition  of  the  pulverized  ooal 
more  rapidly. 

\  Sketoh  of  this  Spreader  is  enclosed,  and  by  adjusting 

|  the  Spreader  oloser  or  further  from  the  end  of  the  pipe,  greater 


g  7-24-11. 

Mr.  Edison. 

or  less  distribution  of  the  pulverised  ooal  can  be  obtained. 
as  is  found  necessary  or  desirable,  thus  changing  the  Ibcation 
of  the  heat  in  the  kiln. 

So  far  our  best  results  have  been  obtained  by  burning 

a  mixture  of  36#  anthraoite  and  66#  gas  ooal. 

By  this  means  we  can  utilise  the  lower  and  cheaper 
erades  of  anthraoite  ooal.and  this  effeots  oonsiderable  saving. 
It  would  seem  if  we  oould  pulverise  anthraoite  sufficiently 

..  >01111  1.  all.  «  «  *•»*«*  *”J  5““  °°°1' 

Yours  very  truly, 

WHil-KR. 

Eno.  1. 


te&fijwon- 

TKe  Edison  Portland  Cement  Co. 


is.  STEWARTSVILLE,  N.  J.  8‘v‘"h 
July  24,  1911. 


legal  Department, 

Edison  laboratory. 

Orange,  H.  J. 


Mr,  Prank  D.  lewis. 

Dear  Sir: 

Your  letter  of  the  21st  inst.  to  Mr.  Mallory  has  been 
referred  to  me.  I  beg  to  advise  that  I  have  written  to  Mr. 
Edison  giving  him  facts  and  a  sketch  of  this  Gun. 

I  do  not  just  know  what  he  wants  to  cover  in  thiB 
patent,  and  I  thought  it  best  to  give  him  the  opportunity  to 
go  over  my  letter  and  forward  it  to  you  with  hiB  comments. 

Hoping  this  is  satisfactory,  I  am  ) 

Yours  very  truly. 


WHM-BR. 


Patent  Series 
Patent  Application  Files 

Folio  #  806  Method  of  Forming  Sound-Record  Molds 

U.S.  Patent#:  1097985 

Primary  Applicant:  Moore,  Sherwood  T 
Date  Executed:  11/29/191 1 


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Patent  Series 
Patent  Application  Files 

Folio#  813  Alternating-Current  Rectifier 

U.S.  Patent#:  1221981 

Primary  Applicant:  Edison,  Thomas  A 
Date  Executed:  12/12/1911 


/  ,1  ,  September  29 ,  1916 

.*,1.  .<*•='**  T 

Mr.  Edison.  p0II0  813  -  applioatiorftof  Thomas  A.E^ison  for 

Alternating  Current  Reotifiers,  filed  Deonr-BO,  1911, 
Serial  Ho.  668,611  ^ 

Claims  6  to  11  inclusive  of  this  application  are  under 
final  rejection.  The  invention  covered  by  these  claims  is  the 
use  of  a  carbon  contact  on  the  annature  in  a  reotifier.  The 
finally  rejected  olaims  read  as  follows :- 

6.  In  an  alternating  current  rectifier,  an  elongated 
armature  of  magnetic  material  provided  with  a  carbon  contact, 
substantially  as  described. 

7.  In  an  alternating  current  reotifier,  an  armature, 
a  oarbon  contact  oarried  thereby,  and  means  for  vibrating  the 
armature  in  synchronism  with  the  ourrent  to  be  rectified,  sub 
stantially  as  described. 

8.  In  an  alternating  current  reotifier,  an  elonga¬ 
ted  soft  iron  annature  pivotally  mounted  at. 

and  provided  with  a  oarbon  contact  member  at  the  other  end, 
substantially  as  described. 

9.  In  an  alternating  current  reotifier,  a  station¬ 
ary  contact  member  having  a  large  oontaot  surface,  anda 
Plurality  of  oarbon  contacts  adapted  to  co-operate  therewith 
by  movement  into  and  out  of  contact  therewith,  substantially 
as  described. 

10.  In  an  alternating  current  rectifier,  the  com¬ 
bination  of  a  carbon  contact,  and  means  for  vibrating  the 
same  in  synchronism  with  the  alternating  current  to  be  recti- 
fied,  substantially  as  described. 

11.  In  an  alternating  current  reotifier,  a  station¬ 
ary  contact  member  and  a  contact  member  adapted  to j 
therewith  and  to  be  moved  into  and  out  of  operative  relation 
thereto  in  synchronism  with  the  alternating  ourrent  to  be 
rectified?  o™  of  £aid  contacts  being  of  carbon,  substantially 
as  desoribed. 


-2- 

The  references  upon  which  the  claims  are  rejected  are 
British  patent  18608  of  1901  and  U.S.  patent  to  Russell  756,048. 

The  British  patent  shows  a  rectifier  of  substantially  the  same 
type  as  the  rectifier  shown  in  this  application.  See  particularly 
Pig.  2  of  the  British  patent.  In  the  patent  to  Russell,  an  elong¬ 
ated  conducting  member  8*  is  pivotally  mounted  at  one  end  and  car¬ 
ries  a  carbon  pencil  serving  as  a  contact  at  the  other  end,  adapted 
to  contact  electrically  with  two  fixed  contacts  18  and  13.  Hears 
is  provided  for  osoillating  the  elongated  member  from  one  contact 
position  to  the  other.  The  particular  use  of  the  Russell  device 
is  for  establishing  circuit  oonneotions  alternately  through  lamps 
used  in  an  advertising  device. 

The  Examiner’s  position  is  substantially  that  there  is 
no  invention  in  providing  the  vibratory  member  d  shown  in  Rig.  8 
of  the  British  patent  with  a  carbon  contact  such  as  is  used  in  the 
Russell  patent.  The  Examiner  states  his  position  as  follows :- 


-The  British  patent  18,508  of  1901  discloses  an 
elongated  armature  of  magnetic  material  sync hroMusly  driven 
*  *  *  the  substitution  on  suoh  an  armature  of  a 

^rbon  contact  for  a  metallic  one  would  be  obvious,  in  view 
of  the  analogous  use  of  suoh  a  carbon  contaothy  Resell  and 
the  extreme  oommonness  of  carbon  oontaots  on  all  kinds  o 
oirouit  make  and  break  mechanism. 


Y/e  believe  that  the  Examiner’s  position  is  oorrect  and 
that  the  claims  are  not  patentable. 

Will  you  kindly  advise  me  whether  you  wish  to  take  an 


-3- 

appeal  from  this  rejection  to  the  Board  of  Examiners.- in-Chief , 
whether  you  are  willing  to  have  us  cancel  these  rejected  claims 


Patent  Series 
Patent  Application  Files 

Folio  #  81 0  Method  for  Producing  Tablets  for  Sound-Records 

U.S.  Patent#:  1146413 

Primary  Applicant:  Edison,  Thomas  A 
Date  Executed:  12/19/1911 


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Patent  Series 


Patent  Application  Files 


Folio#  812  Production  of  Finely-Divided  Metals 

U.S.  Patent#:  1275232 


Primary  Applicant:  Edison,  Thomas  A 
Date  Executed:  12/20/1 91 1 


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Edison, 


Proposed  Mew  Claims  in  Application  of  Thomas  A. 

Serial  Ho.  667,366,  filed  December  22,  1911,  en¬ 
titled  Production  of  i'inely  Divided  Metals 


12.  A  new  composition  of  matter  consisting  of  | 
electrolytically  active  iron  reduced  in  finely  divided  con¬ 
dition  and  rendered  non-pyrophoric  without  change  in  its 
physical  structure,  substantially  as  described. 


13.  A  new  composition  of  matter  consisting  of 
electrolytically  active  iron  reduced  in  finely  divided  con¬ 
dition  and  rendered  non-pyrophoric  without  change  in  its 
physical  structure  or  its  chemical  properties,  substantially 
as  described. 


14.  A  new  composition  of  matter  consisting  of 
slectrolytically  active  iron  reduced  in  finely  divided  con- 
lition  and  rendered  non-pyrophoric  without  substantial  chang^ 
Ln  its  porosity,  substantially  as^esoribed. 


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In  your  application  it  is  stated  that  the  hydrogen  may 
he  displaced  by  passing  nitrogen  or  some  other  suitable  inert  ,gas 
through  the  reduced  mass.  Is  carbonic  acid  gas  a  suitable  inert 
gas  for  this  purpose? 

What  advantage  is  there  in  using  nitrogen  instead  of 
carbonic  acid  gas  in  treating  iron? 

What  advantage  is  there  in  permitting  the  reduced  mass 
of  iron  to  cool  before  displacing  the  hydrogen  by  the  nitrogen? 


,h„c  at  present  claims  la  the  oa.e  whioh  arc  not 
limited  to  iron  as  th.  metal  treated  end  not  limited  to  the  nee 
of  nitrogen  a.  a  gas  for  dieplaoind  the  hydrogen.  In  new  of 
th,  sayeer  mtent,  th,  olei-  ahonld  prohahly  he  ao  limited. 

yon  think  ..  should  endeavor  to  ..onre  «.  I*"—*  of  a  ol.» 
anoh  as  el.i.  Id.  "Meh  differ.  fro.  olaim^ty  renting  that  the 
iron  ..  .i.etrolrtleally  active.  or  ■«»*  ““  01  “““ 

ter  desorihed  in  claim  U.  that  »  to  say,  non-pyroph.rio  finely 
divided  and  free  fro.  hydrate,  or  hydroxides  w  eleotrolytioally 


[ON  BACK  OF  PREVIOUS  DOCUMENT] 


^.^.6  drr.'-.  X  "-■<=■ 

77  L ,  - 


Mr.  Edison 

Kindly  advise  me  whether  the  attached  proposed  amend¬ 
ment  and  argument  in  your  application  for  the  preparation  of  non- 
pyrophorio  iron  meets  with  your  approval.  I  have  talked  with 
Mr.  Aylsworth  about  this  application  and  have  also  consulted 
Bell's  Book  on  Iron  Smelting  recommended  by  you.  According  to 
Bell,  see  page  94,  carbon  dioxide  has  substantially  no  effect  on 
nickel  at  the  temperature  of  melting  zinc,  that  is  to  say,  about 
417°  C.  At  a  low  red  heat  there  would  be  a  slight  oxidation  and 
at  a  bright  red  heat  considerable  oxidation.  Apparently,  in  the 
process  of  tee  Kayser  there  would  be  some  oxidation,  but  of  this 
I  am  not  sure.  Claim  8  covering  non-pyrophorio  finely  divided 
iron  free  from  hydrates  or  hydroxides  has  been  allowed,  and  in 
accordance  with  your  suggestion  a  claim  is  now  presented  covering 
non-pyrophoric  finely  divided  iron  free  from  oxygen  compounds. 

The  other  claims  for  which  allowance  is  now  asked  are  method  claims, 
the  broadest  of  Tdiich  are  1  and  2,  claim  1  relating  to  reducing 
any  metal  from  a  suitable  compound  by  hydrogen  and  displacing  the 
hydrogen  by  nitrogen,  and  claim  2  relating  to  reducing  iron  by 
hydrogen  and  displacing  the  hydrogen  by  any  inert  gas. 

I  would  not  trouble  you  about  this  matter  if  it  were 
not  for  the  obscure  nature  of  the  phenomena  involved  in  your 
invention  and  in  the  references  cited. 


HI- JS 


- 


XH  THE  UNITED  STATES  PATfiHT  OPPICE 
Thomas  A,  Edison. 

PRODUCTION  OP  FI3BOT  DIVIDED  METAIiS  Room  Hq<  17g 

Piled  December  22,  1011 
I  Serial  Ho.  667,366 

|  HOHORABLB  COMMISSIONER  OP  PATENTS, 

j  SIR  : 

I  Xn  response  to  the  Office  notion  of 

j  January  26,  1914,  please  annua  the  above  entitled  case  as 
follows 

Page  3,  line  10,  before  "free”  insert  -  not  only 
free  from  asides  but  i3  also  -  .  S 

Cancel  claims  1,  8  and  3  and  renumber  cUnims  4  1g 


10  inclusive  as  1  to  7  inclusive.  i| 

Senuniber  claim  11  as  8  ana  rewrite  tho  Bamo  as 

follows:- 

8.  A  new  composition  of  matter  consisting  of  | 
on-pyrophorio  finely-divided  iron  free  from  hydrates  or  ' 

hydroxides,  substaatially  as  described.  - 
Cancel  claim  12. 

Add  the  following  olaim:  - 

9.  A  new  composition  of  matter  consisting  of 
non-pyrophorio  finely- divided  iron  free  from  oxygen  cmj 

j^poundg,  substantially  as  described.  - 

,  t 


Mr.  Edison :- 


- - 


RE  Al.lBHBIiEIIT  OP  FOLIO  E 


/  t&  ^  “  ~  ^  ^ 

In  your  application  for  the  p^ftuEttion  of 
finely  divided  iron,  claims  1  to  7  incisive .^lovej 


cess,  have  been  allowed. 

This  application  contains  the  following  c laims^overiji^ 
the  product  resulting  from  the  process  described  in  the  jpplio 
.io«:-  ^ 

B.  A  new  composition  of  matter  consisting:  of 
non-pyrophoric  electrolytically-aotive  iron  reduced  in 
finely  divided  condition  and  free  from  hydrates  or  hydrox¬ 
ides,  subs/bantially  as  described. 

9.  /Hon-pyrophorio  eleetrolytioally-active  iron, 
reduced  in  finely  divided  condition  and  having  its  particles 
free  f  rod  rS^ygen  compounds  of  iron,  substantially  as  de¬ 
scribed./ 

10 /  Finely  divided  iron  reduced  by  hydrogen 
from  a  finely  divided  compound  or  compounds  of  iron  and 
rendered  non-pyronhorie  by  displacement  of  the  hydrogen 
from  the  reduced  mass  by  an  inert  gas,  substantially  as 
described. 

Al.  Eon-pyrophoric  finely  divided  iron  having 
substantially  the  same  physical  and  electro-chemical  prop¬ 
erties  as  non-pyrophoric  finely  divided  iron  produced  by 
first  reducing  iron  by  hydrogen  from  a  suitable  compound  or 
compounds  and  then  displacing  the  hydrogen  by  an  inert  gas, 
substantially  as  described. 

All  the  above  product  claims  stand  rejected  on  the  dis¬ 
closure  i-n  lines  l»So  21  inclusive,  page  31  of  a_^rk Jy^Roscoe 
and  Scnorlemmer  entitled  "A  Treatise  on  Chemistry” .^reading  as 


"In  order  to  obtain  chemically  pure  iron  the  oxide, 
or  oxalate,  may  be  heated  in  a  current  of  hydrogen  at  the 
lowest  possible  temperature;  the  metal  is  obtained  by 
this  process  as  a  black  powder,  which  oxidizes  and  becomes 


If 


-2- 

incandesoent  in  the  air,  hut  if  the  reduction  he  carried 
on  at  a  higher  temperature,  the  powdered  iron  is  non- 
pyrophorio." 

The  process  of  obtaining  the  non-pyrophorio  iron  as 
described  in  your  application  is  as  follows:-  Finely  divided 
oxide  of  iron,  for  example,  ferric  oxide,  is  subjected  to  the 
reducing  action  of  hydrogen  at  a  suitable  high  temperature,  for 
example,  say  1000  or  1200  degrees  F.  After  the  reduction,  the 
reduced  mass  is  allowed  to  cool  slowly  in- an  atmosphere  of  hydro¬ 
gen  to  normal  temperature  after  which  a  current  of  nitrogen  or 
other  inert  gas  is  passed  through  the  reduoed  mass  so  as  to  dis¬ 
place  the  hydrogen,  care  being  taken  to  prevent  the  access  of  air 
or  oxygen  to  the  reduced  mass. 

Will  you  kindly  advise  me  whether  the  non-pyrophorio 
finely  divided  iron  produced  by  the  method  disclosed  in  your 
application  is  different  physioally,  eleotroohemically,  or  other¬ 
wise  from  the  iron  produced  in  the  manner  described  in  the  matter 
quoted  above  from  the  work  of  Roscoe  and  Schorlemmer.  A  print 
of  page  31  of  the  work  of'  Roscoe  and  Schorlemmer  is  attached 
hereto . 

WH-JS 


cV-CCj 


i>~  r:  ^Z\  :i 

^ff^/|0Li0_812  ^  L(S  JJ(^°f  ^tCtCf  f' 

'-Jam  sending  Vou  herewith  our  copy  of  the  above  appli- 
o.tion,  Serial  Ho,  Ig^JlSh**- 

Production  o'Pffi&y  ifSd'ed 

mi.  applioation  relate,  p.rtioul.rly  to  th.  produotlon 
,f  non-pyrophorio  finely  divided  iron,  and  oont.ine  eeve.  olai.e 
covering  the  process  which  have  been  allowed. 

The  application  also  contains  the  following  claims 

covering  the  produet:- 

8.  A  new  composition  of  matter  consisting  of 

tially  as  described. 

in  Finelv  divided  highly  porous  iron  reduced 
„y  hydros..  f»?.*^'^0S5}:440SXM~0»!*5'«! 
tially  as  described. 

11  Non-pyrophoric  finely  divided  highly  porous 

iron  having^substantially  the  same  physical  and^electro-^ 

agffigSSfeKSSF* 


-2- 


All  of  the  above  -product  claima  stand_finally... rejected. 
on  the  disclosure  in  lines  16  to  21  inclusive,  page  31  of  the  work 
by  Roscoe  and  Sohorlemmer  entitled  "A  Treatise  on  Chemistry",  these 
lines  reading  as  follows 


"In  order  to  obtain  chemically  pure  iron,  the  oxide 
or  oxalate  may  be  heated  in  a  current  of  hydrogen  at  the 
lowest  possible  temperature;  the  metal  ^obtained  by 
this  process  as  a  black  powder,  which  oxidizes  and  be- 
comes  incandescent  in  the  air,  but  if  the  reduo._t.l_an_be 
carried  on  at  a  higher  temperature  the  powdered  iron  is 
not  pyrophoric." 


The  above  claims  for  the  product  also  stand  rejected 
on  the  ground  that  they  attempt  to  cover  the  product  by  process 
steps. 

Kindly  advise  whether  you  wish  an  appeal  taken  from  the 


action  of  the  Examiner  in  finally  rejecting  these  product  claims. 

In  case  you  wish  sg^an  appeal  taken,  I  wouia  appreci¬ 
ate  it  if  you  would  indicatlrXein  the  non-pyrophoric  iron  pro¬ 
duced  as  described  in  the  application  differs  from  the  non-pyro- 
phoric  iron  produced  in  accordance  with  the  description  contained 
in  the  work  "A  Treatise  on  Chemistry"  referred  to  above.  It 
would  also  be  of  assistance  to  me  if  you  would  authorize  Mr.  John 
Miller  or  some  one  else  of  the  Chemical  Works  to  disclose  to  me 
exactly  how  the  iron  used  in  the  storage  batteries  is  made. 

A  print  of  page  31  of  the  work  of  Roscoe  and  Schorlemmer 
referred  to  is  attached  hereto. 


WH-JS 


,  J  /{}  h 


Mr.  Edison:-  / 

I  expect  to  be  in  Washington  on  the  30th  0/  this  month 
to  attend  a  hearing  before  the  Commissioner  of  Patents.  Accord¬ 
ingly,  if  it  is  possible  for  you  to  see  the  Examiner  with  reference 
to  your  application  relating  to  the  production  of  non-pyrophoric 
iron  referred  to  in  the  attached  memorandum,  at  any  time  between 
one  and  four  thirty  P.M.  on  that  date,  I  will  make  proper  arrange¬ 
ments  for  a  conference. 


X/txf 

r  (/a > 


ty/$. 


Kfi  f  ' 


inif  ©©> 


Silver  Lake,N.J. 
Jan.  28*  1918. 


Hr.  Hardy, 

legal  .Department, 

Edison  atorage  Battery  oo., 
Orange ,  N .  J . 


We  aro  submitting  you  two  samples  of  Experi¬ 
ments  made  up  in  the  following  manner; 

Experiment  No.  3009.  ( 

!Dook  100  gms  of  regular  red  iron  and  reduced^ 
at  a  temparaturo  of  1100  P. 

‘Dime  for  reduction  -  1  1/2  hours. 

Both  inlet  and  out-let  valves  on  the  pot  were 
closed  and  tho  pot  was  connected  to  Hydrogen  line 
and  cooled  to  room  temperature.  Time  -  14  hours. 

Both  valves  were  again  closed  and  the  pot  was 
connected  to  line  supplying  Nitrogen.  This. was 
aone  to  displace  the  Hydrogen. 

Hitrogen  wa3  obtained  by  passing  air  through 
set  of  purifiers  composed  of  sulfuric  acid,  lerrous 
Sulphate  and  Alkaline  solution  of  pyr°S*1Pi° 

Nitrogen  was  passed  through  pot  for  1  1/2  hours. 
The  pot  was  then  opened,  the  iron  was  a  good 
gray  color,  all  reduced,  soft  and  crushed  easily 
under  finger  pressure. 

Experiment  No.  3010.  ^ 

Took  100  gras  of  regular  red  iron  ana  reduced^ 
at  a  temperature  of  1600°P. 

Time  for  reduction  -  1  l/2  hours. 

Both  inlet  and  outlet  valves  on  the  potwere 
•  closed  and  the  pot  was  then  connected  to  Hydrogen 
line  and  cooled  to  room  temp.  Time  -  2  hours. 

The  pot  was  then  opened  and  the  iron  was  hard 
and  slightly  oxidized,  and  combined  in  one  lump, 
and  would  not  break  up  under  finger  pressure . 


CFH-Cr  . 


Supt. 


Patent  Series 
Patent  Application  Files 

Folio#  818  Storage  Battery 

U.S.  Patent#:  1073107 

Primary  Applicant:  Edison,  Thomas  A 
Date  Executed:  12/30/1911 


'.goi4l|Sk20^ 


Patent  Application  Files 


Folio  #  81 4  Method  of  Recording  Sounds 

Serial  #:  669868 

Primary  Applicant:  Edison,  Thomas  A 


Date  Executed: 


1/2/1912 


Applicant. 

. . /?....  . 


y. . <£jf ., . /?/; 


Examiner’s  Room  No. 


...  Liber . Page 


Patent  No.  Issued . 


ACTIONS. 

^  l  .  to. 


.  20 
.  30.. 


FRANK  L.  DYER, 

Counsel, 


petition 


®o  tljc  Commissioner  of  patents : 

§?our  Petitioner  thomas  a.  edisoh, 

a  citizen  of  tlje  ©nitcb  States,  residing  anb  fjabing  a  Post  Office  abbreSS  at 

Llewellyn  Park,  West  Orange,  County  of  Essex,  and  otate  of  itew 
Jersey, 

prays  tfjat  letters  patent  map  be  granteb  to  bint  for  tlje  improbements  in 

_  METHOD  op  HECOBDIHO  BODBDa- 


set  fort!)  in  tlje  annexeb  specification;  anb  Ije  hereby  appoints  JfranU  %. 3Bper 
(Registration  i2o.  560),  of  Orange,  J2eto  Jersey,  W  attorney,  toitlj  full 
polner  of  substitution  anb  rebocation,  to  prosecute  tljis  application,  to  mabe 
alterations  anb  amenbments  therein,  to  receibe  tlje  patent,  anb  to  transact  all 
business  in  tlje  Patent  Office  connected  tljeretoitf). 


v7^M7.  ¥i. 


SPECIFICATION 


TO  All  WHOM  IT  MAY  CONCERN: 

BE  IT  KNOWN ,  that  I,  THOMAS  A.  EDISON,  a  citizen 
of  the  United  States,  and  a  resident  of  Llewellyn  Park, 

West  Orange,  in  the  County  of  Essex  and  State  of  New  Jersey, 
have  invented  certain  new  and  useful  improvements  in 
METHOD  OF  RECOUPING  SOUNDS  of  which  the  following  is  a 
description: 

My  invention  relates  to  methods  of  recording 
sound,  moro  particularly  when  the  source  of  the  sound  is 
at  a  considerable  distance  from  the  recording  instrument. 

The  object  of  my  invention  is  to  provide  an  improved  method 
of  this  character  whereby  sounds  may  be  faithfully  reoorded 
and  a  record  having  good  acoustic  qualities  obtained. 

When  the  sound  from  a  given  source  is  reoorded 
in  a  room,  as  has  heretofore  been  customary,  tho  walls  of 
the  room  reflect  the  sound  waves  and  these  reflected  waves 
after  one  or.-|more  reflections  enter  the  horn  of  the  re¬ 
cording  instrument  together  with  the  true  waves  direct  from 
the  sound  source,  all  of  those  waves  being  greatly  ampli¬ 
fied  by  the  recording  horn.  As  the  reflected  sound 
waves  reach  the  recording  instrument  later  than  the  direct 
waves,  an  objectionable  sound  interference  is  caused;  so 
that  when  a  record  made  in  this  way  is  reproduced,  the 
reproduced  sound  is  found  not  only  to  be  differont  from 
that  emanating  direotly  from  the  original  sound  source,  but 
also  to  be  less  agreeable  and  harmonious.  When  the  source 
of  sound  is  in  close  proximity  to  the  horn  of  the  recording 
instrument,  this  depreciation  in  quality  is  not  very  notice- 
able,  but  when  it  is  at  a  considerable  distance  from  the 


I  horn,  ns  is  necessarily  the  case  with  the  different  instru- 
I  ments  of  an  orchestra  which  is  rendering  the  selection  to  he 

1  recorded,  the  depreciation  in  quality  is  considerable,  thiB 
depreciation  in  many  instances  being  so  groat  that  the  re¬ 
production  of  the  sound  as  recorded  for  some  of  the  in¬ 
struments  is  very  disagreeable. 

■  I  have  discovered  that  the  recording  of  those 

I  reflected  waves  is  the  cause  of  the  difference  in  quality 
between  the  sound  as  heard  by  the  ear  directly  from  the  ori£- 
inai  sound  source  and  as  heard  from  the  ordinary  phonograph 
I  record;  and  my  invention  accordingly  contemplates  the 
elimination  of  the  reflected  sounds  or  sound  waves  from 

I  the  record.  In  accordance  with  my  invention,  I  record 
the  sound  at  a  considerable  distance  from  any  means  tending 
|  to  reflect  the  sound  into  the  horn  of  phe  recording- in-  y  , 

I  strument. ~  This  may"  bo  done*  in  the  "open  air 'or,  if  desired, 

1  ■  ti'„.  ,  „  7* 

in  a  canvas'"  tbnt.  -  In  the  latter  case,  the  earth  which, 

j  ‘A  *  stx***^  ' 

constitutes  the  floor  of  tho  tent,  as  well  as  thcjwalle  of 
I  tho  tent,  tend  to  dissipate  rather  than  reflect  the  sound 
I  waves  impinging  on  the  same,  so  that  none  of  these  waves 
are  recorded  and  it  is  possible  to  obtain  a  record  of  a  high 
degree  of  accuracy  and  of  good  quality. 

It  is  to  be  understood  that  I  do  not  limit  my3elf 


Ito  the  recording  of  the  sounds  in  a  tent,  but  that  ray  in¬ 
vention  contemplates  generally  the  recording  of  sounds  at 


Idistanoe  from  any  meanB  tending  to  reflect  the  sound  waves 
from  the  original  source  into  tho  horn  or  receiver  of  the 
recording  instrument. 

Having  now  described  my  invention,  what  I  claim 
and  desire  to  protect  by  letters  Patent  is  as  follows 

- - - ■  r  <  ft-- 7  f/*-  -y/  <o> 

1.  fho  proooss~of-ma5cing_.original  Bound  records 

which  consists  in  locating  the  sourcT^f'soinid'rd^s'*!?0”' — 


^sound  reflecting  surfaces,  causing  the  omission  of  tho 
sounds  to  be~reoorded,_and  making  a  reoord  thereof,  sub¬ 
stantially  as  described. 


The 


lo^prpceslf  .of’  making  original  e 


consists  in  locating  the  source  of  sound  and  the  recording 
instrument  remote  from  surfaces^  oa-pablo--ef  -reflecting  the 
sound  from  the  source  into  tho  recording  instrument,  causing 
the  emission  of  tho  sounds  to  be  recorded,  and  making  a 
reoord  thereof,  substantially  as  described. 

,3.  *  The^prooisss ' of  making  original  sound  records^Mc'ii 
consists  in  locating  the  source  of  sound  in  a  tent  free  froip 
sound  reflecting  surfaces,  causing  the  emission  of  the 
sounds  to  be  recorded,  and  making  a  record  thereof,  sub¬ 
stantially  as  described. 


The  process  of  making  original  sound  records  v/liiclji 
consists  in  oausing  the  emission  towards  j(  recording  instru. 
ment  of  the  sounds  to  be  recorded,  and  dissipating  the  sountjl 
waves  not  directly  conveyed  from  the  sound  source  to  the 
recording  instrument,  substantially  as  described* 

Jo.  The  process  of  making  original  so\iri^”records^‘*:‘^;,'“ 
which  oonsists  in  locating  tho  soxtree  of  sound  and  tho 
recording  instrument  in  a  housing  having  non-sound- 
reflecting  walls  and  free  from  surfaces  capable  of- refleot- 
4ng  the  sound  from  the  source  into  the  recording  instrument 
causing  the  emission  of  the  sounds  to  be  recorded,  and 
making  a  record  thereof,  substantially  as  described. 


®fji S  Specification  Signeb  anti  toitneSSeb  tfjis  ^  bap  19«S^ — 

_ 1 .  A  t_  ___ 

Witnesses : 

^  ^ _ _ 


©atb. 


g>tate  of  i?etu  fersep 
Count})  of  (Essex 


thomas  a.  edisoh  >  lt)c  abobe  naineb 
petitioner,  being  bulp  Stoorn,  beposes  anb  Saps  tfjat  Ije  is  a  citizen  of  tfje  ©toitcb 
States,  anb  a  reSibent  of  Llewellyn  Park,  West  Orange,  Essex  County, 
Hew  Jersey 


tfjat  fje  berilp  beliebes  fjimself  to  be  tfje  original,  first  anb  Sole  inbentor  of  tfje 
iniprobemcnts  in  method  op  record ihg  sodjids 


bescribeb  anb  clainieb  in  tfje  annexeb  specification;  tfjat  fje  boes  not  feuoto  anb 
boes  not  beliebe  tfjat  tfje  Same  bias  eber  fenobm  or  useb  before  fjis  inbention  or 
biscoberp  tfjereof;  or  patenteb  or  bescribeb  in  anp  printeb  publication  in  tfje 
Uniteb  States  of  America  or  anp  foreign  countrp  before  fjis  inbention  or 
biscoberp  tfjereof,  or  more  tfjan  ttoo  pears  prior  to  tfjis  application;  or  patenteb 
in  anp  countrp  foreign  to  tfje  Uniteb  States  on  an  application  fileb  more  tfjan 
ttoelbe  montfjs  prior  to  tfjis  application ;  or  in  public  use  or  on  sale  in  tfje 
Uniteb  States  for  more  tfjan  tbio  pears  prior  to  tfjis  application ;  anb  tfjat  no 
application  for  patent  upon  saib  inbention  fjas  been  fileb  bp  fjim  or  fjis  legal 
representatibes  or  assigns  in  anp  foreign  countrp. 


[g>eall 


J.H.D.-8. 


tif 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 
UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 

WASHINGTON  February  14,1912. 


Thomas  A.  "Edison, 

Rare  prank  L.  Byor, 
Or  ansa,  Mow  Jersey  . 


use  find  below  a  communication  from 

for  Method  of  pa cording  So 
069,8(58  . 


'  0.  S.  PRTWT  OFFICE, 

FEB  141912 

MAILED. 

s  EXAMINER  in  charge  of  your  application. 

:da,  filed  jan.  6, 191.'!,  seritil  number 


All  surfaces  reflocted  sound  somewhat,  She  matter  of 
reflection  by  different  substunoes  being  a  matter  of  degree. 
Accordingly  the  process  of  claim  1  is  impossible  of  performance 
and  the  claim  is  accordingly  rej noted. 


It  is  old  to  make  the  walls  of  a  Bound  recording 
chamber  non  reflecting  for  a,  portion  of  their  area  as  see 
Prescott, July  26, 1910, #965,327, (181-30).  It  in  also  well  known 
to  provide  a  non  reflecting  surface  for  a  greater  or  less 
portion  of  the  interior  walls  of  an  audltorium^se^ pages  92  and 
93  of  Kelly's  Architectural  Acoustics, published  in  1898  by 
-easier  and  Weoley  Print .Buffalo, Mew  York,  a  copy  of  which  volume 
may  be  found  on  the  examiner's  desk  and  the  disclosure  in  the 
Scientific  American  of  Juno i  19, 1909, page  A&:  in  an  artlole 
entitled, Method  of  Correcting  Faulty  Acoustic  Properties  of 


Public  Halls.  In  view  that  it  is  well  known  to  surround  partly  a 

source  of  sound  where  it  is  desired  to  prevent  reflection, 
invention  is  not  found  in  extending  tae  degree  of  such  enclosure 

even  to  the  extent  of  total  enclosure.  Moreover,  it  being 
desired  to  prevent  reflection,  the  most  obvious  thing  to  do  is  to 
locate  tlie  source  of  sound  and  recording  instrument  where  there 
is  an  absence  1  of  reflecting  BurfuooB  and  it  is  not  seen  that 


#669,, 8(58 - 2. 

invention  is  Involved  in  -selecting  such  plaoo.  Accordingly  all 
of  tlui  claims  ;..re  rejected  . 

Claiss  1,  2  and  4  are  additionally  rejected  us  specifying  no 
Flora  than  using  any  wall. known  recording  instrument  out  of  doors, 
a  prooesu  that  is  not  a  subject  of  patentability. 

Claim  3  is  additionally  rejected  as  specifying  no  more  than 
using  any  common  recording  instrument  in  a  tent,  which  is  hold 
not  to  he  of  patentable  subject  matter  . 


IH  THE  UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 


METHOD  OF  RECORDING  SOUNDS 
Filed  January  6,  1913 


HONORABLE  COMMISSIONER  OF  PATENTS, 


In  response  to  the  Offioe  aotion  of 
February  14,  1913,  please  amend  the  above  entitled  oaee 


In  line  16,  page  3,  after  "done"  insert  -  with 
the  souroe  of  sound  and  the  rooording  instrument  -  ;  .  in 
line  17,  same  page,  oanoel  "oanvas"  ana  after  "tent"  insert 
-  or  housing  of  heavy  fabrio,  suoh  as  oanvas  -  ;  and  in 
line  18,  same  page,  ohange  "walls"  to  -  entire  walls  and 


In  line  3,  olaim  3,  ohange  "oapable  of  refloating' 
to  -  tending  to  refleot  -  . 

In  lines  4  and  6,  olaim  5,  ohange  "oapable  of 
refloating"  to  -  tending  to  refloat  -  . 

Canool  olaim  1  and  ohange  the  numerals  of  olaims 
3  to  5  inclusive  to  1  to  4  inolusive. 

Add  the  following  olaims: 

“’u^ 4/“bT ^The^pr ooess^  'o flaking  original  sound  records^  " 
whioh  consists  in  looating  the  souroe  of  Bound  and  the 
reoeiver  of  the  recording  instrument  in  a  housing,  thV, en¬ 
tire  walls,  roof,  and  floor  of -whioh  tend  to  dissipate  fyie 
sound  waves  impinging  thereon,  causing  the  emission  of  thi 
sounds  to  be  recorded,  and  making  a  reoord  thereof  by  meand 
of  said  recording  instrument,  substantially  aB  desoribed,  i 


'pro  coos  of  making  original  sound  ro  cords  ^y/hi  oh 
consists  in  locating  tho  Bource  of  uound  and  the  receiver 
of  the  recording  instrument  in  a  housing  having  walla  of 
yielding  Bound  dissipating  material  and  free  from  surfaces 
tending  to  refloot  tho  sound  vmvoo  from  tho  source  into  the 
recording  instrument,  causing  the  omission  of  tho  Bounds 
to  he  recorded  .and  making  a  record  thereof,  substantially 


as  described. 


!The ^process  of  mailing  original  sound  j 


vW 

scords 


vhich  consists  in  locating  tho  source  of  sound  and  the 
receiver  of  tho  recording  instrument  in  a  housing  having 
vails  of  sound  dissipating  fabric  and  free  from  surfaces 
tending  to  rofloct  tho  sound  waves  from  tho  source  into  tho 
recording  instrument,  causing  tho  emission  of  the  sounds 
to  bo  recorded  and  making  a  rooord  thoreof,  substantially 
as  dosoribod. 

"‘“fhlf "process^ oTmaWng^original  'sound  rocor.4A 
which  consists  in  locating  the  soiirco  of  sound  and  tho 
reccivor  of  the  recording  instrument  in  a  housing  having 
walls  of  heavy  sound  disoipnting  fabric  and  froo  from 
surfaces  bonding  to  reflect  the  sound  waves  from  tho  source 
into  tho  recording  instrument,  causing  tho  omission  of  tne 
sounds  to  he  recorded  and  making  a  record  thereof,  sub¬ 
stantially  as  described. 


VMv 


TrT^ing  original  sound  rodords^ 
which  consists  in  locating  the  source  of  sound  and  the 
receiver  of  tho  recording  instrument  in  a  housing  having 
walls  and  a  roof/of^ound  dissipating  fabric  and  a  sound 
dissipating  floor,  causing  the  emission  of  the  rounds  to 
he  rocordod,  and  making  a  rooord  theroof  by  mcanB  of  said 


a 


reoording  instrument,  substantially  as  desoribea. 

proooss  of  mating  original  sound  reoo?dsA 
which  oonaistB  in  looating  tho  souroa  of  sound  and.  the 
reoeivor  of  the  reoording  instrument  in  a  housing  having 
walls  and  a  roof  entirely  of  heavy  sound  dissipating  fabrio 
and  a  sound  dissipating  floor,  causing  the  emission  of  the 
sounds  to  be  reoorded,  and  making  a  reoord  thereof  by  means 
of  Bald  reoording  instrument,  substantially  aB  desoribed. 


REMARKS 


Hone  of  the  roferonoes  discloses  applicant's, 
invention.  Aooording  to  the  disclosure  of  tho  patent 
to  PreBOott,  some  of  the  sound  waves  pass  to  the  reoording 
instrument  direotly  while  others  are  refleoted  from  the 
surfaoe  3  to  the  reoording  instrument;  so  that  the 
corresponding  diroot  and  refleoted  Birand  waveB  reach  the 
reoording  instrument  at  different  times  and  the  objection¬ 
able  sound  interference,  whioh  it  is  applicant's  objeot  to 
eliminate,  is  produoed.  Hone  of  the  other  roferonoes.  dis¬ 
closes  a  prooess  of  making  sound  reoords.  Tho  mere  dis¬ 
closure  of  an  auditorium  provided  with  a  non-sound -reflect¬ 
ing  surfaoe  for  a  portion  of  its  interior  walls,  whioh  iB 
evidently  what  the  Examiner  doBires  to  3how  by  these 
references,  does  not,  it  is  thought,  constitute  an 
anticipation  of  applicant 'e  invention.  In  the  first 
plaoe,  the  neoossary  arrangement  of  parts  to  produoe  ,\ 
applioant's  process  is  not  disoloeed  or  suggested  in  ^hose 
references ,  there  being  no  disolosure  or  oontemplatibn\- 
whatever  of  a  sound  reoording  instrument.  In  the  seoohd 
plaoe,  these  roferonoes  do  not,  aB  stated  above,  eVen 

3 


suggest  a  process  of  making  sound  rooords.  The  decisions 
are  clear  on  the  point  that  a  procoss  ,1s  not  necessarily 
anticipated  hy  apparatus  ovon  if  that  apparatus  might 
have  been  uBcd  to  carry  out  tho  procoss.  See  for 
example,  Carnogio  Steel  Co.,  Ltd.  v.  Cambria  Iron  Co.,  22 
3.  Ct.  698;  188  U.S.  403”;  46  L.  Ed.  968;  99  0.0.  1066; 


19,02  C.E.  692,  in  which  it  was  hold: 

"To  anticipate  a  process  patent  it  is 
necessary  not  only  to  show  that  tho  prior  patont 
might  have  boen  used  to  carry  out  tho  process, 
but  that  ouch  uso  was  contemplated  or  that  it 
would  have  occurrod  to  an  ordinary  mochaniB  in 
operating  tho  devieo." 


In  the  prosont  case,  the  apparatus  disclosed 
in  tho  references  is  not  even  oapablo  of  carrying  out 
the  process  sot  forth  in  the  claims. 

Roforring  to  tho  last  two  paragraphs  of  the 
last  Offico  action,  it  is  pointod  out  that  the  Examiner's 
statements  as  to  what(tho  claims  in  quostion  specify,  aronot 
entirely  accurate  in  that  those  claims  specify  a  process 
in  which  tho  source  of  sound  and  recording  instrument 
are  romoto  from  surfaces  tending  to  rofloct  tho  sound 
waves  from  tho  source  into  tho  recording  instrument.  Of 
courso,  applicant's  procoss  would  not  be  anticipated  by 
recording  out  of  doors  if  such  recording  wore  done  in 
the  vicinity  of  a  largo  surface  capable  of  reflecting 
the  sounds  from  tho  source  into  tho  recording  instrument. 

If  the  claims  are  proporly  construed,  it  is  not  soon  upon 
what  ground  the  Examiner  oould,  in  tho  absence  of  pertinent 
rof orencoB ,  hold  that  tho  procoss  covered  thereby,  is 
unpat ontablo . 


Applicant  has  obtained  improved  rosults  by  the 


J.H.D.-Sut. 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 
UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 
WASHINGTON 


Srank.L,.  Dyer, _ _ 

. Orange,...  Raw .  J  e  re.ey 


'lease  find  below  a  communication  from  the  EXAMINER  in  charge  of  the  application  of 

-Thoma8.JU..HdlAon^.:.-nflrlaL-_nurohflr66fl,8M._flled  Jan.  6.1913,  for 
•Method... of.  Recording.  Sounds..* . 


This  aotion  is  responsive  to  the  amendment  filed  Jan.  24, 

1913. 

Applicant  ia  required  to  file  a  drawing  in  this  oase 
illustrating  the  process  oluioed. 

Claims  1  and  3  are  rejected  as  specifying  oftly  efhfjioynignt-’ 
of  any  conventional.  recording  machine  out  of  doors  remote 
from  reflecting  surfaces. 

Claim  2  is  rejeoted  as  specifying  only  the  use  of  any 
conventional  recording  machine  in  a  tent,  as  for  example, the^x 
use  of  any  dictating  machine  as  Talnter,Dec.  27,1867,  #376,979, 
(181-2). 

Furthermore,  all  of  the  olaims  are  rejected  upon  the 
publications  of  record  or  the  following:  an  artiole  entitled 
"Arohlte  (Rdral  Aoou8tios"'  by  If.  R.  Watson,  in  the  8oientifio 
Amerioan  Supplement, 1909,'  volume  LXVTII,page  391.  Hew  York, 

nv 

Munn  &  Co. ,  or  ^'.volume  entitled  Aooustios  In  Relation  To 
Arohlteoture  and  Building,  by  T.  Rogers  Smith, page  39, London, 
1876, Virtue  and  Co.,  Ivy  Lane,  in  view  of  Prescott,  of  record. 

The  publications  cited  Bhow  it  to  be  well  known  .  when  a 


#669,868- 


-2. 


reflection  of  sound  produces  an  undesirable  result  to  provide  the 
reflecting  surfaoea  with  sound  absorptive  material^  invention-'- 
cannot  be  found  in  apply»hft!,this  known  principle  and  expedient  in 
a  recording  ohamber,  especially  when  such  expedient  is  shown  to 
be  old  to  cover  up  all  of  that  part  of  the  surfaoe  which  the 
patentee  desired  should  not  be  reflectdve  Applicant's  choice 
of  how  inuoh  of  the  surfaoe  of  the  chamber  should  not  be  reflectdve 
cannot  be  seen  to  be  a  display  of  invention. 


IH  THE  UHX TED  STATES  PATKIIT  OFFICE. 


THOMAS  A.  EDI SOE,  ) 

METHOD  OF  RECORDIHO  ) 

SODHDS , 

Filed  Jamiary  6,  1912,  ^ 

Serial  Ho.  669,868.  ) 


Room  Ho.  379. 


HOIIORABLE  COMMISSIOHF.R  OF  PATEIIT3  , 

SIR: 

In  response  to  the  Office  aotion  of 
February  26,  1915,  please  m«en3  the  above  entitled  case 
a3  follows: 

In  line  1,  claims  1,  2,  4,  5,  6,  7,  0.  9. 
ar.3  after  "roeor3s"  insert  -  with  the  soiirco  of  sound  at 
a  considerable  distance  from  the  recording  instrument  -  . 

In  line  1,  claim  3,  after  "records"  insert 
with  the  sound  source  at  a  considerable  distance  from 
the  recording  instrument  -  ;  and  in  line  2,  same  claim, 
change  "a"  to.  -  the  -  • 


REMARKS 

A  drawing  illustrating  the  process  clnimBd 
will  be  filed  as  soon  as  the  patentability  of  the  claims 
1b  determined- 

It  is  submitted  that  the  claims  as  now  presented 
are  not  anticipated  by  the  prior  art  of  record;  and  it 
is  thought  that  this  will  appear  very  dearly  if  the 
Honorable  Examiner  will  consider  in  connection  with  the 
prior  art  the  problem  solved  by  'applicant  and  the 
results  obtained  by  the  invention-  It  is  no  doubt 
well  known  to  the  Examiner  that  the  sound  rocords  of  the 


1 


prior  art  give  an  unnatural  and  imperfect  reproduction - 
The  applicant's  problem  was  to  improve  the  reproductive 
qualitioB  of  Buch  reoords,  particularly  when  the  records 
are  made  with  the  source  of  tho  sound  to  be  recorded  at  a 
considerable  distanoe  from  the  recording  instrument. 

In  working  upon  this  problem,  applicant  discovered,  as 
stated  in  tho  second  paragraph  on  page  2  of  the  specifi¬ 
cation,  that  the  recording  of  reflected  sound  waves  is 
the  cause  of  the  difference  in  quality  between  the  sound 
as  heard  bv  the  ear  dlrootlv  from  the  original  sound 
source  ar.d  as  heard  from  the  ordinary  phonograph  record. 

It  should  be  borne  in  mind  that  this  discovery  is  essential 
ly  oonnootod  with  applicant's  invention.  Having  made 
the  said  discovery,  applicant  evolved  a  sound  recording 
process  which  eliminated  the  reflected  sounds  or  sound 
waves  from  the  record.  By  means  of  this  process ,  he 
found  that  he  could  malce  a  sound  record  capable  of 
reproducing  the  origiral  sound  with  a  surprising  increase 
in  faithfulness-  An  improved  result  was  thereby  obtained. 

H6t  one  of  tho  references  of  record  discloses 
applicant's  invention.  The  argument  made  in  connection 
with  the  last  amendment  that  none  of  the  references  dis¬ 
closes  either  applicant's  process  or  apparatus  whereby 
the  same  may  be  oarried  out,  still  applies  in  spite  of 
the  new  citations  made  by  the  Examiner,  attention  being 
agdin  directed  to  the  said  argument.  Tho  Examiner,  it 
is  thought ,  fails  to  take  into  consideration  that  appli¬ 
cant's  problem  was  to  record  sounds  and  not  merely  to 
prevent  the  refleotion  of  sounds,  ar.d  that  applicant  made 
tho  valuable  discovery  that  tho  recording  of  the  reflected 
waves  is  the  cause  of  the  difference  in  quality  between 
souhds  as  hoard  by  the  ear  directly  from  the  original 
sound  source  and  as  hoard  from  the  ordinary  phonograph 
record.  Tho  claims  do  not  call  for  a  process  for 


preventing  the  reflection  of  sour. a  waves,  they  call  for  a 
process  of  ranking  original  sound  recoras  with  the  source 
of  souna  at  a  consiaerable  aistnnce  from  the  rocorair.g 
instrument,  ar.3  the  publications  cite!  ao  not  suggest  uny 
such  process. 

All  the  claims  huve  been  omor,ao3  so  as  to  more 
clearly  aefir.e  the  invention  by  the  aaaitior.  of  the 
statement  that  the  source  of  sour.a  is  at  a  oor.siaerable 
aistnnce  from  the  recoraing  instrument. 

With  reference  to  the  grounds  of  rejection  state3 
by  the  Examiner  in  tho  thira  an3  fourth  paragraphs  of  the 
last  Office  action,  attention,  is  directed  to  tho  amendments 
made  in  tho  claims  ar.3  also  to  the  argument  made  above 
There  is  no  suggestion  in  the  prior  art  of  recording 
ooundB  out  of  doors  remote  from  reflecting  surfaces  or  ir. 
a  tent  free  from  sound  reflecting  surfaces,  the  source  of 
sound  being  located  at  a  considerable  distance  from  the 
recording  instrument. 

Applicant  has  inverted  a  new  process  involving  an 
important  disoovery,  producing  an  improved  result,  ar.d  not 
disclosed  by  the  prior  art-  The  claims  are  thought  to 
properly  define  tho  invention;  and  reconsideration  ar.d 
ollowaroe  are  respectfully  requested. 

Reap cot fully  submitted , 

THOMAS  A.  EDI  SOU  , 

By  /?  r  - . 

Orange,  Hew  Jersey,  his  -attorney. 

February  1914. 


Jo . Yi^”tn  v 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 
UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 

WASHINGTON  Mar  Clh. 19,.. 1914.-. 


Prarifc  I.  Dyer. 


. -  - 

noose  find  below  o  communication  from  the  EXAMINER  in  char^fihe  application  of 

. Tliomae-A»EaiBonj--l'or--M8tioaofReoordliiB-3ound3,-nia.d^J.au.*-fi»-. 

-191fit-8»rial-Ho*  669,8e&. - 


•  Commissioner  of  Patent*.  (/ 


In  response  to  amendment  of  Pet.  4,  1314. 

All  of  the  claims  are  rejected  upon  the  references  and  for 
the  reasons  ::of  record.  She  common  limitation  that  applicant  has  ap- 
pended  to  the  claims  hy  the  above  noted  amendment  is  olearlyehown  in 
Prascott'ofreoora.lB  a  clear  issue  has  been  reached  between  applloaulj 
and  this  offioe  as .  tfc  the  patentability  of  the  subject  matter  of  these, 
claims ,  no  reason  is  seen  for  further  prosecution  before  the  examiner. 
Accordingly,  the  rejection  of  the  claims  is  made  final.  Ex  parte 
Hiller,  150  0.  0.,  887. 


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Patent  Series 
Patent  Application  Files 

Folio  #  81 5  Method  of  Making  Sound-Record  Molds 

U.S.  Patent#:  1099349 

Primary  Applicant:  Edison,  Thomas  A 


Date  Executed: 


1/2/1912 


7^.  2u^i-  Krv-  n  „ 


Patent  Series 
Patent  Application  Files 

Folio#  819  Charging  Storage  Batteries 

U.S.  Patent#:  1143818 

Primary  Applicant:  Edison,  Thomas  A 

Date  Executed:  1/12/1912 


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Patent  Series 


Patent  Application  Files 


Folio  #  820  Phonograph-Record 

U.S.  Patent#:  1111999 

Primary  Applicant:  Edison,  Thomas  A 

Date  Executed:  1/19/1912 


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Patent  Series 
Patent  Application  Files 

Folio  #  821  Concrete  Furniture 

Serial  #:  674274 


Primary  Applicant:  Edison,  Thomas  A 
Date  Executed:  1/24/1912 


Folio  No. 

Serial  No.  ■/>  ?</-,•?  J.  ^ 

Applicant. 

Address. 

£ _ 

. . . . . . — • 

1  Itle  .MMZ'WUAJ..  - . 

Filed  li/Uf/U .  ^  *  LU..X' 

Examiner’s  Room  No. 

Assignee 

Recorded .  Liber  Page 

Ass’g’t  Exec . 

Patent  No. 

actions. 

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1:1  Nii 

. . . 

. 30 .  . 

FRANK  L.  DYER, 

Orange,  New  Jersey. 


petition 


®o  tlje  Commissioner  of  ^patents : 


gout  petitioner  ehokas  a.  edxsoh 
a  citijen  of  tije  Unite*  states,  refilling  an*  Dabing 
Llewellyn  Park,  ’.Vest  Orange,  Essex  County, 


a  Posit  ©ffice  n**rcSS 

Hew  Jersey 


at 


prapo  tijat  letters  patent  .nap  be  grante*  to  Dim  for  tije  implements. in 


COHOEE'JE  EURHIEURE 


set  fortij  in  tije  annexe*  specification;  an*  be  Derebp  appoints  Jfranb  JL.  ©per 
(Registration  jfco.  560),  of  ©range,  £eb>  fersep,  Di^ttornep,  ImtD  full 
-  p0toec  of  substitution  an*  rebocation,  to  prosecute  tftuf  appl.cat.on,  to  mabe 
alterations  an*  amen*nients  tDerein,  to  receibe  tfje  patent,  an*  to  transact  a 
business  in  tije  Patent  ©ffice  connecte*  tberetoitb. 


SBECIFICATION 


ITO  ALL  WHOM  IT  MAY  CONCERN: 

BE  IT  KNOWN,  that  I,  THOMAS  A.  EDISON,  a  oitizen 
j!  of  the  United  States  and  a  resident  of  Llewellyn  Bark,  West 
Jj  Orange,  Essex  County,  New  Jersey,  have  invented  oertain  new 
I  ana  useful  improvements  in  CONCRETE  FURNITURE,  of  whioh  the 
i|  following  is  a  speoifioation: - 

My  invention  relates  to  the  production  of  articles 
i  of  furniture  of  oonorete,  and  has  for  its  objeot  the  pro¬ 
vision  of  artioles  of  this  oharaoter  whioh  are  strong, 
i  durable,  fire-proof,  oheaper  than  wood,  and  not  subjeot 
!  to  the  deteriorating  influences  whioh  affeot  wood. 

My  invention  consists  generally  in  furniture, 

J  Qa0h  artiole  of  whioh  comprises  a  skeleton  or  framework 
i  whioh  of  itself  has  sufficient  strength  to  be  self-sustain- 
-I  ing  and  to  withstand  usage  without  breaking,  the  said 
skeleton  or  framework  being  oovered  with  oonorete.  I  may 
form  the  skeleton  or  framework  as  an  integral  struoture  or 
of  parts  seoured  together,  assemble  the  framework  thus  form- 
|  ea  in  a  suitable  mold,  ana  pour  into  the  mold  and  around  the 
framework  a  suitable  oonorete  mixture.  Or,  I  may  moia 
the  oonorete  around  separate  parts  designed  to  form  the 
framework  of  the  artiole  of  furniture  to  be  oonBtruotea, 

!  ana  then  seoure  together  the  oomposite  members  thus  formed, 
j  I  prefer  to  employ  metal  for  the  framework. 

•|  Xn  order  that  my  invention  may  be  better  under- 

i!  stood,  referenoe  is  haa  to  the  drawings  aooompanying  ana 
J  forming  a  part  of  this  speoifioation,  and  in  whioh  - 


/ 


I  • 

Figure  1  is  a  perspective  view  of  a  ohairoon- 
I  struoted  in  aooordanoe  with  my  invention;  ana  i 

j  Figure  2  is  a  seotional  view  of  parte  ready 

!|  for  assembling  to  form  a  portion  of  a  bedstead  oonstruot- 
|  ed  m  aooordanoe  with  a  modified  form  of  my  invention, 
j  Referring  particularly  to  Figure  1,  in  full. 

3  lines  at  1  is  shown  a  skeleton  or  framework  which  is- 
!  preferably  made  of  steel  hollow  pieoes.  such  as  pipes, 
j  m  order  to  give  lightness  combined  with  the  requisite 
|  strength.  The  pieoes  may  be  secured  together  by  screw 
j!  Joints  like  those  used  with  ordinary  piping,  or  may  be 
.  j  melded  together  by  any  suitable  process  as  for  example 
|  by  the  oxaoetylene  torch.  Or,  some  of  the  joints  may 
|  be  made  by  welding  and  the  others  by  other  methods  or 
j  means.  The  framework  is  then  placed  in  a  suitable  seo- 
|  tional  mold  and  positioned  in  the  mold  by  small  pieces  of 
j  metal  or  oonorete  and  surrounded  by  the  oement  mixture, 
j  After  the  oement  mixture  has  hardened,  the  sections  of  the 
'  !j  mold  are  removed,  and  the  framework  is  left  covered  with 
concrete  as  is  shown  in  dotted  lines  at  2.  The  article 
is  then  ready  for  use  or  for  further  treatment  such  as 
|  painting. 

.j  in  article  of  furniture  may  also  be  constructed 

\  in  accordance  with  my  invention  by  forming  composite  member 
j  adapted  to  be  secured  together  after  molding.  In  Figure  2 
I  have  shown  several  such  composite  members  adapted  to  be 
1  secured  together  to  form  a  portion  of  a  bedstead.  Each 
of  these  members  consists  of  a  frame  piece  10  of  suitable 
'  j  Bi2e  and  shape  and  preferably  of  steel  tubing  or  piping. 

|  Each  frame  member  is  provided  with  means  for  fastening  it 


(2) 


I  to  adjaoent  members  to  whioh  it  is  designed  to  be  seoured, 

Ias  for  example,  sorew  threaded  extensions  11  or  sorew 
threaded  sockets  or  oonplings  12.  Eaoh  frame  member  haB 
a  oovering  of  oonorete  molded  thereon.  A  complete  artiole 
!  of  furniture  in  whioh  the  Joints  between  adjaoent  seotions 
!  are  Boaroely  peroeptible  may  be  formed  by  seouring  together 
I  suoh  oomposite  members. 

I  I  prefer  to  employ  a  oement  mixture  or  oonorete 

of  the  oharaoter  dt scribed  and  claimed  in  my  application 
Serial  Ho.  639,752,  filed  July  21,  1911.  This  oement 
;  mixture  or  oonorete  consists  of  oement,  preferably  Portland, 

:  mixed  with  very  light  porous  sand  or  other  aggregates,  such 
|  as  pumice  stone,  oharooal,  ooke,  or  furnaoe  slag  made  porous 
f  by  steam  or  other  gases  blown  through  the  molten  mass,  and 
|S  water. 


The  oonorete  surrounding  the  skeleton  or  frame- 
I  work  may  be  molded  in  highly  ornamental  shapes.  As  the 
j;  framework  is  made  strong  enough  to  be  self-sustaining,  and 
'  |  furthermore  the  steel  has  great  strength  in  tension  and  the 
ji  oonorete  considerable  strength  in  compression,  the  oomposite 
!i  artiole  is  of  great  strength  as  oompared  with  artioleB 
!  ji  made  of  reinforoed  oonorete  where  the  Bkeleton  itself  iB 
|  not  formed  into  or  does  not  constitute  a  self-sustaining 


| 


i! 


skeleton  or  frame. 

In  aooordnnoe  with  my  invention,  ohairs,  sofas, 
tables,  bureaus  and  almost  every  artiole  of  household  furni¬ 
ture  may  be  oonstruoted.  These  articles  may  be  made  of  a 
highly  ornamental  oharaoter  with  a  cheapness  unattainable 
by  the  use  of  wood,  and  may  be  very  light  in  weight,  if 
desired. 


The  artlole  may  be  painted,  gilded  or  otherwise 
oolored  in  any  desired  manner.  Portions  of  artioles  of 
furniture  as  well  as  oomplete  artioles  may  be  oonstruoted 
in  aooordanoe  with  my  invention. 


Having  now  desoribed  my  invention,  what  X  olaim 
and  desire  to  proteot  by  letters  Patent  is  as  follows:- 

•ga,,.,  4  "T-C. ? 


\  1.  An  artiole  of  furniture  inoluding  a  self-sus¬ 
taining  framework  oovered  with  oonorete,  substantially  as 
desoribed. 


2.  \.n 


artiole  of  furniture  inoluding  a  self-sustain¬ 
ing  metallioNframeworlc  oovered  with  oonorete,  substantially 
as  desoribed.  \ 

3.  An  artiole  of  furniture  inoluding  a  self-sustain¬ 
ing  metallio  framework  oovered  with  oonorete  oomposed  of 
aement  and  porous  aggregates,  substantially  as  desoribed. 

4.  An  artiole  of  furniture  inoluding  a  self-sustain¬ 

ing  metallio  framework  oovered  with  oonorete  oomposed  of 
Portland  oement  and  porous  aggregates,  substantially  as 
desoribed.  \ 

5.  An  artiole  of  furniture  inoluding  a  self-s 
taining  metallio  framework  oovered  with\oonorete  oompoBed 
of  Portland  oement  and  pumioe  stone,  substantially  as  de¬ 
soribed. 

6.  An  artiole  of  furniture  inoluding  an 'integral 
self-sustaining  framework  oovered  with  oonorete, 
stantially  as  desoribed. 


(4) 


7.  An  artiole  of  furniture  including  an  integral 
aelf -sustaining  metallio  framework  covered  with  oonorete, 
substantially  as  aesoribed. 

\ 

jl  8.  in  artiole  of  furniture  inoluding  an  integral 

|  self-sustaining  motallio  framework  oovered  with  oonorete 
Ij  composed  of  oement  and  porous  aggregates,  substantially 


as  described. 


\ 


9.  An  artiole  of  furnittire  including  an  integral 
self-sustaining  metallio  framework  ooverod  with  oonorete 
oompoood  of  Portland  oement  and  porous  aggregates,  sub¬ 
stantially  as  desoribed.\ 

\ 

||  10.  An  artiole  of  furniture  inoluding  an  integral 

!j  self-sustaining  metallio  framework  oovored  with  oonorete 
.  jj  oomposed  of  Portland  oement  andxpumioe  stone,  substantially 
j  as  desoribed.  \ 


11. 


An  artiole  of  furniture  \nolufting  composite 
laii  t 


members  seoured  together,  eaoh  of  saia^  members  oonsisting 
of  an  inner  frqme  member  and  an  outer 
orete,  substantially  as  desoribed. 

IE.  An  artiole  of  furniture  inoludin^composite 
members  seoured  together,  eaoh  of  said  members^oonsiBting 
of  an  inner  metallio  member  and  an  outer  covering  of 
jj  oonorete,  substantially  as  desoribed. 

jj  13.  An  artiole  of  furniture  inoluding  oomposite 

jj  members  seoured  together ,  .  eaoh  of  said  members  oonsisting 
'  of  an  inner  metallio  member  and  an  outer  oovering  of  \ 
i  oonorete  oomposed  of  oement  and  porous  aggregates,  sub- 
I  staintially  as  desoribed. 


(5) 


|  14.  An  art i ole "of  furniture  Including  oomposite  raem- 

bers  aeouroa  together,  each  of  aaid  members  oonsiating  of 
|  an  inner'x me tallio  member  end  an  outer  covering  of  oon- 
|  orate  composed  of  Portland  oement  and  porous  aggregates, 

1  subatantially  as  aosoribea. 


lljMs 


15.  An  art i ole  of  furniture  inoluaing  oomposite  mem- 
!  bers  seoured  together,  eaoh  of  said  members  consisting  of 
;  an  inner  metallio\nember  ana  an  outer  covering  of  oonorete 
j!  oomposea  of  Portland  oement  ana  pumioo  stone,  substantially 
i  as  aesoribea.  \ 

jj  16.  An  artiole  o\  furniture  including  metallic  mem¬ 

bers  oovered  with  oonorete,  seia  members  being  seoured 
together  ana  constituting  \  self-sustaining  framework, 
substantially  as  aesoribea.  \ 

17.  The  prooess  of  making  furnituro  whioh  oonsists 
in  forming  a  self-sustaining  framework  ana  molding  oonorete 
thereon,  substantially  as  set  forth. 

18.  The  prooeBS  of  making  furniture  whioh  oonsists 
in  forming  a  self-sustaining  metallic  framework  and  moid- 

set  forth. 


j  ing  oonorete  thereon,  substantially  as  i 


j!  19.  The  prooess  of  making  furniture  which  oonBists 

|  ln  forming  an  integral  metallic  framework  an\molding  oon- 
!!  orete  thereon,  substantially  as  set  forth. 

I  20.  The  prooess  of  making  furniture  whioh\onsists 

in  forming  a  self-sustaining  metallic  framework  and^applying 
thereto  a  covering  of  oonorete  composed  of  oement  an\vporouB 
aggregates,  substantially  as  Bet  forth. 


(6) 


121  ,\'J!he  process  of  making  furniture  which  consists 
in  formingh  self-sustaining  metallic  framework  and  applying 
thereto  a  covering  of  concrete  composed  of  Portland  cement 
land  porous  aggregates,  substantially  as  set  forth. 

22.  The  process  of  making  furniture  which  consists 
in  forming  a  self- sustaining  metallic  framework  and  apply- 
;  ing  theroto  a  covering  oXconcrcte  composed  of  Portland  j 
j  cement  and  pumice  stone,  substantially  as  set  forth. 

23.  The  method  of  making  furniture  which  consists 
in  forming  frame  members  adapted \o  be  secured  together, 
covering  the  same  with  concrete  so  a\not  to  interfere 
with  the  securing  moans,  and  securing \gether  the  composite 
members  thus  formed,  substantially  as  sot\forth. 

24.  The  method  of  making  furniture  v/hi\consists 
in  forming  metallic  frame  members  adapted  to  he  poured 
together,  covering  the  same  with  concrete  so  ac  ro\to 
interfere  with  the  scouring  moans,  and  securing  togclW 
(the  composite  members  thus  formed,  substantially  as  set\ 


191^ 


tKjisS  specification  Signeb  anb  toitneSSeb  tljis  "  <P&  bn? 

\r£s<>-<!  ■  'fJ- 

HHitneSSetij: 


®atb. 


gitate  of  i?etu  fersep  1 
Count?  of  CSSex  ) 

ms  a.  EDisoif  .  tije  abobe  natneb 
petitionee,  being  buhj  Stoorn,  beposcs  anb  Sa?S  tfjnt  Ije  is  n  citizen  of  tije  tHnitcb 
states,  anb  a  reSibcnt  of  y;est  Orange,  Essex  County,  itev/  Jersey 


tfjat  Ije  berilij  beliebes  fjimSelf  to  be  tfjc  original,  first  anb  sole  mbentor  of  tije 
itnprobeinents  in 


COHCREOE  i'DRNIDUHE 


beScribcb  anb  clnimeb  in  tije  annexeb  specification;  tljat  Ije  boeS  not  Imobi  anb 
boes  not  beliebe  Ujat  tije  same  tons  eber  Imobm  or  uSeb  before  ijis  inbention  or 
biscober?  tljereof;  or  patenteb  or  beScribeb  in  an?  printeb  publication  in  tfje 
IHniteb  states  of  America  or  an?  foreign  countr?  before  ijis  inbention  or 
biscober?  tljereof,  or  more  tljnn  tbao  ?earS  prior  to  tljis  application;  or  patenteb 
in  an?  countr?  foreign  to  tije  ®niteb  states  on  an  application  fileb  more  tfjan 
ttoelbe  montfjs  prior  to  tljis  application;  or  in  public  use  or  on  sale  in  tije 
®niteb  states  for  more  tfjan  tbao  ?earS  prior  to  tljis  application;  anb  tljat  no 
application  for  patent  upon  saib  inbention  JjaS  been  fileb  b?  Ijim  or  Ijis  lega 
repreSentatibeS  or  assigns  in  an? 


g>baorn  to  anb  subscribeb  before 


[deal] 


n  cotmtr?. 

^JLsl 

me  tljis  *  f  ba?  of 


191*-. 

/j)» 

Jlotar?  public. 


» . -B— 


— 131 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 
UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 
WASHINGTON 

)/V 

ThomaB  A.  Edison,  v 

o/o  Frank  L.  Dyor, 

Orange,  i'.J. 

Please  find  below  a  communication  from  the  EXAMINER  in  charge  of  your  application. 


£674,274,  filed  Jan.  SO,  1912,  for  Concrete  Furniture. 


_  Commissioner  of  Patent*. 

Applicant’s  attention  is  called  to  Ex  parte  Chapman,  120  0.0., 
2446;  Ex  parte  Riley,  C.D. ,  1902,  page  416;  and  Ex  parte  Kadow,  154 
0.0.,  1415,  regarding  multiplicity  of  olaima  and  claims  not  patentahly 
different.  For  instance,  claims  6,  7,  e,  9,  and  10  differ  from  claims 
1,  2,  3,  4,  and  5,  respectively,  only  in  the  insertion  of  tho  word 
"integral"  in  each  olaim.  This  ie  an  unnecessary  multiplication  of 
olaims.  A  single  claim  will  oover  this  difference  just  as  well  &b 
five. 

Claims  11,  12,  13,  14,  and  15  are  objectionable  for  similar 

reasons . 

Claims  3,  4,  5,  B,  9,  10,  13,  14,  IS,  20,  21,  and  22  are  all 
'<  objectionable  in  that  they  attempt  to  oombine  and  oonfuse  Btruotural 
elements  of  which  an  artiolo  is  composed,  and  a  composition  of  matter. 

It  is  of  no  consequence  in  applicant's  device  of  what  particular  com¬ 
position  the  conorete  clement  be  formed,  or  which  one  of  tho  innumerable 
concrete  compositions  applicant  prefers  to  use  in  his , construction, 
and  applicant  should  not,  therefore,  attempt  to  define  a  novel  structure 
in  his  olaim,  by  setting  forth  the  chemioal  composition  of  one  of  its 
elements.  The  particular  composition  of  applicant's  concrete  element 
</ is  old  in  Lands,  299,810,  Jan.  3,  1884;  ParBhall,  323,722,  Aug.  4,  1885, 
Class  106/242,  and  the  reoltal,  therefore,  of  this  particular  composition. 


#674,274. 


even  were  it  proper  to  do  so,  does  not  affeot  the  novelty  of  the 
alleged  combination  sot  forth. 

All  the  olaim£j/are  anticipated  by 

‘■'liurnB,  909,640,  Jan.  12,  1909,  or 
?  English  patent --  2027  of  1874,  Chairs;  or 
,/Prioe,  948,770?  Feb.  8,  1910,  Tables, 

in  view  of 

■''Noll  910,960^  Jan.26,  1909,  oroBo-ref erenoe  in  Tables,  PodeBtals, 
and  -'Crow!  839,2*^^60.  25,  1906,  Class  72/85. 

The  first  threo  references  show  it  to  be  old  to  mold  furniture 
from  oemont  and  othor  materials  having  similar  properties,  providing 
suitable  metallio  or  othor  reenforcing  means  to  strengthen  the  struoture, 
either  by  arranging  the  reenforoo  and  molding  the  oemont  about  it,  or 
forming  an  outer  metallic  shell  and  filling  it  with  cement  as  in  BurnB . 
Noll  shows  it  to  be  old  to  form  a  oomposite  struoture  by  molding  eaoh 
individual  seotion  about  a  roenforoing  member  and  thon  connecting  the 
members  together  by  suitable  means.  Crow  shows  a  struoture  built  up 
of  sections  eaoh  comprising  a  metallio  pipe,  threaded  at  the  endB,  and 
surrounded  by  oement,  the  finished  sections  being  aftcrwardB  assembled 
by  moans  of  the  identical  Joint  sho\on  in  applicant's  Fig.  2.  To  apply 
this  struoture  to  the  furniture  shown  in  Burns,  BngliBh  patent  or  Price 
would  involve  only  the  exercise  of  meohanioaX skill . 

Attention  is  called  to  Small,  590,690,  Sept.  28,  1897,  ClaBS 
^  12  [lO,  and  Graham,  865,490,  Sept. 10,  1907,  Class  72/l5 . 

All  the  claims  are  rejooted. 


IH  THE  UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 


Thomas  A.  Edison  •  ) 
CONCRETE  FURNITURE  ( 
Filed  January  30,  1912  ••  ) 
Serial  No.  674,274  ) 


HONORABLE  C0IR.il  SSI  ONER  OF  PATENTS, 
SIR: 


Room  No.  131 


In  response  to  the  Offioo  action  of 
February  13,  1912,  ploaDe  amend  tho  above  entitled  case 
as  follows:- 


Canoel  the  olaims  and  insert  the  following:  - 

^  ^  ~  7 

1.  An  artiole  of  furniture  oomprising  a  struoture 
oonsisting  of  a  framework  of  oomposite  members,  said  oom- 
posite  members  eaoh  being  oomjjoaed  of  a  metallio  member 
exteriorly  oovered  with  oonoroto,  and  said  metallio  members 
being  united  to  form  a  self-sustaining  skeleton  frame, work, 
substantially  os  desoribed. 

wx/a-W/?  • 

E.  An  artiole  of  furniture  oomprising  a  struoture 
oonsisting  of  a  framework  of  oomposite  members,  Baid  com¬ 
posite  members  eaoh  being  oomposed  of  a  metallio  member 
exteriorly  oovered  with  oonorete  oontaining  porous  aggre¬ 
gates,  and  said  metallio  members  being  united  to  form  a 
self-sustaining  skeleton  framowork,  substantially  as  de¬ 
soribed. 

3.  An  artiole  of  furniture  oompriBing  a  struoture 
consisting  of  a  framework  of  composite  members,  baid  oom- 


(1) 


posite  members  eaoh  being  ooraposed  of  a  metallio  member 
exteriorly  oovered  with  oonorete  containing  aggregates  of 
pumioe  stone,  ana  said  metallio  members  being  unitea  to 
form  a  self-sustaining  skeleton  framework,  substantially 
as  desoribea. 

: . 

4.  An^artiole  of  furniture  oomprising  a  structure 
oonBiBting  of  a  framework  of  composite  members,  said  com¬ 
posite  members  eaCh  being  composed  of  a  metallio  member 
exteriorly  oovered  with,  oonorete,  and  said  metallio  members 
being  united  to  form  a  self-sustaining  integral  skeleton 
framework,  substantially  as  described. 

5.  An' artiole  of  furniture  comprising  a  structure 
consisting  of  a  framework  of  composite  members,  said  com¬ 
posite  members  eaoh  being  composed  of  a  metallio  member 
exteriorly  oovered  with  oonorete  containing  porous  aggre¬ 
gates,  and  said  metallio  members  being  united  to  form  a 
self-sustaining  integral  skeleton  framework,  substantially 
as  described. 

- 

6.  An  artiole  of  furniture  oomprising  a  Btruoture 

4 

consisting  of  a  framework  of  composite  members,  said  com¬ 
posite  members  eaoh  being  oomposed  of  a  metallio  member 
exteriorly  oovered  with  oonorete  containing  aggregates  of 
pumioe  stone,  and  said  metallio  members  being  united  to 
form  a  self-sustaining  integral  skeleton  framework,  sub¬ 
stantially  as  described. 

*/<•>/' '/ 

7.  The  prooe>a  of  making  furniture,  whioh  consists 
in  forming  a  self-Bustaiiliiig  metallio  skeleton  framework, 
and  molding  oonorete  upon  themembors  of  said  framework 

to  oover  the  same  and  form  a  composite  framework  structure, 
I  substantially  as  set  forth. 


(8) 


Ifwv-fat  ‘/4,  v 

8.  The  prooess  of  making  furniture,  whioh  consists 
in  forming  a  self-sustaining  metallio  skeleton  framework, 
and  molding  oonorete  Wntaining  porous  aggregates  upon  the 
members  of  said  framework  to  oover  the  same  and  form  a 
oomposite  framework  stVuoture,  substantially  as  set  forth. 


9.  The  prooess  of  making  furniture,  whioh  consists 

in  forming  a  self-sustaining  metallio  skeleton  framework, 
and  molding  oonorete  oonthining  aggregates  of  pumioe  stone 
upon  the  members  of  said  framework  to  oover  the  same  and 
form  a  oomposite  framework \struoture ,  substantially  us  set 
forth.  \ 

10.  The  prooess  of  making  furniture,  whioh  consists 
in  forming  a  self-sustaining  integral  metallio  skeleton 
framework,  and  molding  oonorete  upon  the  members  of  said 
framework  to  oover  the  same  and  form  a  oomposite  framework 
struoture,  substantially  as  set\ forth. 

11.  The  prooess  of  making\ furniture ,  whioh  consists 
in  forming  a  self-sustaining  integral  metallio  skeleton 
framework,  and  molding  oonorete  containing  porouB  aggregate! 
upon  the  members  of  said  framework  \to  oover  the  same  and 
form  a  oomposite  framework  struatura,  substantially  as 


12.  The  prooess  of  making  furniture,  whioh  oonsistE 
in  forming  a  self -sustaining  integral  metallic  skeleton 
framework,  and  molding  oonorete  containing  aggregates  of 
pumioe  stone  upon  the  members  of  said  framework  to  oover 
the  same  and  form  a  oomposite  framework  struoture,  sub- 


(3) 


13.  The  phAoeaa  of  making  furniture,  which  oonsiats 
in  forming  a  aelf-i^ining  metallic  framework,  assembling 
the  framework  in  a  suitablemold,  pouring  into  the  mold  and 
around  the  framework  a  oonore1>'m^fcure  containing  aggre¬ 
gates  of  pumioo  Btone,  and  removing^mold  after  the 
oonorete  has  hardened,  substantially  as^fc  forth.  - 

REMARKS 

While  it  is  not  thought  that  the  olaims  oanoeled 
are  properly  anticipated  by  the  references  oited,  new  olaimi; 
have  been  submitted  which  are  believed  to  define  applicant <„ 
invention  more  accurately.  ?he  oonorete  mixture  described 
in  the  patent  to  lande,  Wo.  299,810,  is  intended  to  form. a 
hard  durable  artificial  stone  which  will  not  easily  chip  or 
wear.  There  ia  no  disclosure  of  a  relatively  light  oompos  .7 
tion  intended  to  cover  a  metallio  framework  to  form  an 
article  of  furniture.  It  does  not  appear  that  the  iron 
slag  used  by  hands  is  porous.  In  the  composition  describe  l 
in  the  patent  to  Parshall,  Ho.  323.722,  a  material  of  stiff 
consistency  is  produced- which  is  not  capable  of  being  pourel, 
as  is  the  case  with  the  oonorete  mixture  employed  by  appli¬ 
cant,  but  is  applied  with  a  trowel.  Furthermore,  the  .pumi >e 
stone  employed  in  the  mixture  of  Parshall  1b  finely  pulver¬ 
ized  and  not  employed  in  the  form  of  aggregates  as  in  appli¬ 
cant's  mixture.  The  fine  pulverizing  of  the  pumioe  stone 
serves  to  destroy  its  porous  structure  and  does  not  afford 
a  resulting  composition  of  the  requisite  lightness.  The 
patent  to  Burns,  Ho.  909,540  Bhows  a  sheet  metal  structure 
which  is  filled  with  a  composition  of  matter  capable  of 
hardening,  but  does  not  show  a  self-sustaining  framework 


(4) 


a  whioh  the  members  ere  covered  exteriorly  with  a  concrete  | 
lixture.  ®he  patent  to  Price.  Ho.  948.770.  does  not  dis- 
ll0se  a  structure  in  which  there  is  a  self-sustaining  frame-1 
vorli .  British  patent  He  2027  of  1874  is  rather  indefinite 
ln  its  disclosure,  on -account,  of  the  large  number  of  sub-  U 
Btanoes  referred  to  in  general  terms.  It  is  not  believed  I 
that  the  disclosure  of  this  patent  is  of  such  a  character  asj 
to  enable  one  shilled  in  the  art  to  carry  out  the  invention 
without  prolonged  experimenting.  It  seems  clear,  however.  | 
that  this  patent  does  not  show  a  self-sustaining  metallic 
framework,  and  the  material  molded  is  molded  by  pressure 
and  net  poured.  *he  patent  to  Boll.  Ho.  910.950.  shows 
a  concrete  fence  made  of  members,  but  does  not  show  a 
self-sustaining  metallic  framework.  She  patent  to  Crow. 

Ho.  859.272.  shows  a  pole  made  of  edment  covered  members 
joined  together,  and  does  not  show  a  framework.  Ho  specif 
io  compositions  are  disclosed  in  the  patents  to  Bums,  Pried 
Holl.  Crow.  Small,  or  Graham.  In  the  structures  shown  in 
the  patents  to  Small  and  Graham,  the  resulting  structure 
does  not  constitute  a  composite  framework  structure. 

It  is  believed  that  applicant  is  entitled  to 
specify  or  set  forth  the  characteristics  of  the  concrete 
employed  to  cover  the  skeleton  framework  in  some  of  the 
claims,  inasmuch  as  the  character  of  this  material  is  of 
importance  in  rendering  applicant's  invention  practicable, 
furthermore,  it  is  believed  that  there  is  a  patentable  dis- 
;inotion  between  those  claims  in  which  an  integral  skeleton 
framework  is  recited  and  those  olaims  in  whioh  the  integral 
feature  is  omitted,  inasmuch  as  there  are  certain  advantages 


(5) 


aeoured  by  having  the  skeleton  framework  integral,  ana 
j  structures  having  the  integral  framework  constitute  one. 

I  speoiea  of  applioant’s  invention. 

It  is  thought  that  the  olaims  now  presented  dis- 
tinguish  patent  ably  from- the  art  cited.  Reoonsideration 
and  alio wan oo  ore  requested. 

|  He spoot fully  submitted, 

I  ?HOHAS  A.  EDISOlt 


Orange,  Hew  Jersey 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 

UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE  . . 

WASH  I NGTON  . March  18!,  4 913 


•Prank  Tj.  Dyer,  LI 

. Qrango  ,-  B.  J. . 


Pleas,  find  below  a  communication  from  the  EXAMINER  in  charge  of  the  application  of 
,.Thomaa..A...Mi 


Commmioner  of  V( 


Amendrae&t  of  Peb.  12,  1913  is  of  record. 

Claims  1  to  6  are  rejected  on  the  English  reference  2087, 
of  1874  of  record.  This  patent  describes  and  shows  a  skeleton 
framework  oovered  with  concrete . LShey  are  also  roj acted,  on  Barns 
in  view  of  Poll,  both  of  record.  In'viev  of  Boll’s  showing,  tho 
applloatldn  of  tho  concrete  to  the- exterior  of  the  skeleton  frame 
work  instead  of  tho  interior  is  devoid  of  all  novelty..,  These  claims 
are  also  believed  to  be  fully  anticipated  by  Graham  of  record,  o*  % 
Crow  of  reoord ,  who  have  a  self  supporting  skeleton  frame  work  to 
which  concrete  is  applied  Exteriorly.  It  is  not  belieded  that  tho 
argument  of  non-analagous  art  applies  merely  because  applicant 
has  ohosen  another  form  of  article  to  illustrate  his  idea.  Tho 
result  desired  and  means  by  which  it  fcs  accomplished  is  the  some 
in  these  oases. 

Claims  3,  5  and  6  are  further  rejected  on  the  ground  of 
aggregation.  There  is  no  relation  between  the  structural  arrange¬ 
ment  and  the  kind  of  material  used.  Adding  to  the  practicability 
of  the  devioes,  even  if  true,  (being  a  matter  of  opinion  merely) 

cannot  affect ’iho'hu^tion  cf-patentable,, combination,  , Moreover 

the  material  used  is  disclosed  by  Marshall  of  record,  the  slse  of 
V  aggregate  being  necessarily  dlctatedby  the  finish  desired.  The 
)uraA.«f  oonorete  in  stiff  and  web  conditions  and  their  respective 


1 


674,274 . -»• 

advantages  are  well  known  and  1*  oannot  therefore  affeot  the 
applicability  of  a  reference.  Applicant's  attention  In  also  called 
to  the  statements  made  In  the  previous  Office^  aotl.ononjhls  point. 

The  remaining  claims  are  rejected  on  886,677,  Semer,  May, 

6,  1900.  They  are  also  rejected  on  the  ground  thatjthcy  are  olaims 
for  a  non- patentable  prooess.  The  steps  mentioned  arc  obvious 
from  the  finished  article  and  fully  disclosed  by  It. 

It  is  not  believed  that  the  opplioant  has  differentiated  or 
attempted  to  differentiate  from  the  previous  olaims  or  limited 
their  scope  and  therefore  a  reiteration  of  the  previous  rejections 
and  objections  is  sufficient;  but  that  the  issue  may  be  as  clearly 
defined  as  possible,  a  further  application  and  explanation  of  the 
references  has  been  attempted. 


in  THE  UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 


Thomas  A.  Edison 
CONCRETE  FURNITURE 

Room  Ho.  13 I 

Filed  January  30,  1912 

Serial  Ho.  674,274  - 

HOHORABIE  COMMISSIONER  OF  PATENTS, 

SIR:-  In  response  to  the  Offioe  aotion  of  Maroh  18, 

1913,  please  amend  the  above  entitled  oase  as  follows 

In  line  1  of  eaoh  of  olalmB  1  to  6  inolusive, 
before  "artiole"  insert  -  portable  -  . 

Oanoel  olaimB  7  to  13  inoluBive. 

REMARKS 

The  prooeBS  olaims  have  been  oanoeled  beoauBe 
it  is  believed  that  applicant's  Invention  will  be  adequate¬ 
ly  proteoted  by  the  artiole  olaims  submitted.  The  artiole 
olaims  1  to  6  inolusive  have  been  amended  to  set  forth 
definitely  that  the  artiole  is  a  portable  one.  As  pointed 
out  in  the  argument  aooompanying  the  amendment  dated  Febru¬ 
ary  11,  1913,  the  British  patent  No.  2027  of  1874  does  not 
show  a  self-sustaining  metallic  framework,  and  the  disclos¬ 
ure  of  this  patent  is  too  indefinite.beoause  of  the  large 
number  of  substanoeB  referred  to  in  general  terms,  to  enable 
one  even  though  skilled  in  the  art  to  oarry  out  the  inven¬ 
tion.  It  is  believed  that  this  patent  should  be  withdrawn 
as  a  referenoe,  or,  if  further  rejeotion  of  the  olaims  is 


(1) 


made  upon  it,  the  Examiner  should  point  out  what  portion 
of  the  diaoloaure  of  the  patent  he  relies  upon.  The  pat¬ 
ent  to  Burns,  Ho.  909,540,  shows  a  sheet  metal  structure 
whioh  is  filled  with  a  aomposition  of  matter  oapable  of 
hardening,  but  does  not  show  a  self-sustaining  framework 
in  whioh  the  members  are  oovered  exteriorly  with  a  oon- 
orete  mixture.  The  thin  metal  employed  by  Burns  Bimply 
serves  as  a  mold  or  frame  for  the  artlole  to  give  the  same 
form  while  it  is  being  made,  and  is  not  relied  upon  to 
furnish  the  strength  neoessary  in  an  artiole  of  furniture. 

In  applicant's  invention  the  skeleton  or  framework  haB  suf¬ 
ficient  strength  of  itself  to  be  self-sustaining  and  to 
withstand  usage  without  breaking.  The  patent  to  Ho 11, 
910,950  simply  shows  reinforoing  tension  members  embedded 
in  oonorete.  The  patent  to  Graham,  No.  865,490,  shows  an 
arrangement  of  reinforoing  for'  building  oonstruotion  ar¬ 
ranged  within  the  body  or  maBS  of  oonorete  to  afford  added 
strength  thereto  (see  page  1  of  Graham's  speoifioation, 
lines  10  and  11).  In  other  words,  Graham's  oonBtruotion 
is  merely  a  variation  of  ordinary  reinforoed  oonorete  oon¬ 
Btruotion.  The  patent  to  Crow,  No.  039, 272,  does  not 
show  a  framework  oovered  with  oonorete  but  Bimply  an  elong¬ 
ated  pole  made  up  of  oonorete  oovered  seotions. 

The  Examiner  has  rejeoted  olaims  3,  5  and  6  on 
the  ground  of  aggregation.  It  iB  believed  that  all  parts 

II  of  the  struoture  defined  in  these  olaimB  oo-operate  to  pro¬ 
duce  the  desired  result  and  that  the  rejeotion  upon  the 
ground  of  aggregation  is  untenable.  As  pointed  out  in  the 
speoifioation  of  this  application  and  in  the  speoifioation 
of  applicant' b  prior,  application  Serial  No.  639,752  referred 
to  on  page  3,  the  use  of  a  oonorete  oontalning  porous  aggre¬ 
gates  or  oontaining  aggregates  of  pumioe  Btone  results  in 


a  superior  produot  for  the  purpose  intended,  and  is  believed 
to  amount  to  invention.  In  this  oonneotion,  extracts  from 
the  following  deoisions  are  cited: - 


"The  substitution  of  one  material  for  another  may! 
amount  to  invention  where  a  superior  produot  results  I 
from  the  substitution." 

Eureka  Blotter  Bath  Company  vs.  Nioholas  et  al. 
157  F.  556. 

"The  use  of  a  different  material  in  obnBtruoting 
an  article  previously  patented  involves  invention 
where  it  produaes  a  useful  result,  increased  effic¬ 
iency,  or  a  deoided  saving  in  operation." 

George  Frost  Co.  et  al.  vs.  Samstag  et  al. 

180  F.  739. 

"The  substitution  of  one  material  for  another 
involves  invention  where  the  substituted  material  is 
used  in  a  relation  in  whioh  it  had  not  before  been 
used  and  in  whioh  it  aooomplished  new  and  very  bene- 
fioial  results." 

119  F.  505. 


Furthermore,  as  pointed  out  in  the  argument  previously 
filed,  the  pumioe  stone  employed  in  the  mixture  of  Farshall, 
No.  323,722,  is  finely  pulverized  and  is  not  employed  in 
the  form  of  aggregates. 

Claims  4,  5  and  6  distinguish  also  from  the  ref- 
eronoeB  in  reoiting  that  the  self-BUBtaining  skeleton 
framework  is  integral,  whioh  is  a  fe'ature  not  Bhovm  in  any 
of  the  references. 

Reconsideration  end  allowance  are  requested. 

Kespeotfully  submitted, 

THOMAS  A.  EDISON 

By  ^  _ 


Orange,  New  Jersey 
Mar oh  16,  1914 
Hl-JS 


His  Attorney 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 

UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 

WASHINGTON  . 

.S!rtujlc..L.«~Hyar, . 

. Orange, - - 

....JJaw.-leroey-.. 

Pleas,  find  Mow  a  communication  from  the  EXAMINER  in  charge  of  the  application  of 

TVinman  A.  iMljton— .Barlul-Ho-.— 0-74*^74,--- -f-t-i-ad.— Jan-*— 50y— 

- - - 


In  roaponae  to  the  unondnent  filed  Hur.  17,  1914s 
The  oluirau  ura  euoh  rejected  on  tho  referenooa  and  for 
the  reasons  of  reoord. 

Aa  the. awenanent  doea  not  in  uny  way  alter  the  aoopo  of 
the  alulae, ~thlo‘  rejection  io  mude  final. 


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Patent  Series 
Patent  Application  Files 

Folio  #  825  Means  for  Reducing  Sounds 

U.S.  Patent#:  1190133 


Primary  Applicant:  Edison,  Thomas  A 
Date  Executed:  2/15/1912 


2, 


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Patent  Series 


Folio#  826 
Serial  #: 

Primary  Applicant: 


Patent  Application  Files 


Insulating  Coatings  for  Storage  Battery  Containers  and 
Other  Articles 

679744 

Edison,  Thomas  A 


Date  Executed:  2/23/1912 


petition 


®o  tlje  Commissioner  of  patents : 

gout  petitioner  xiiomas  a.  unison , 

a  citijen  of  tfje  ®nitcb  States,  reSibing  anb  fjabing  a  post  ©fficc  abbreSS  at 

Llewellyn  Pork,  West  Oraneo,  Essex  County,  How  Joroey, 


praps  tfjat  letters  patent  map  be  granteb  to  Ijim  for  tfje  improbements  in 

_  IIISULATIITG  COAT  IK  GS  POP  STORAGE  BATTERY  COIITAIIIEES 
Alt])  OTHER  ARTICLES  - 


Set  fortfj  in  tfje  annexeb  Specification ;  anb  fje  fjerebp  appoints  Jfranfe  TL.  ©per 
(Registration  i2o.  560),  of  ©range,  J?eto  JerSep,  Ijis  attornep,  toitfj  full 
pobaer  of  substitution  anb  rebocation,  to  prosecute  tin's  application,  to  ntabe 
alterations  anb  amenbments  therein,  to  receibe  tfje  patent,  anb  to  transact  all 
business  in  tfje  Patent  ©ffice  connected  tfjerebritfj. 


(q  cLL*-* v's'*. 


A 


SPECIFICATION 


|.  to  ALIi  WHOM  IT  KAY  CONCERN:- 

li  BE  IT  KNOWN  that  I,  THOMAS  A.  EDISON,  a  oitizen 

1 .  0f  the  United  States  and  a  resident  of  Llewellyn  park, 
if  West  Orange,  Essex  Oounty,  Hew  Jersey,  have  invented  oer- 
jj  tain  new  and  useful  improvements  in  INSULATING  COATINGS  FOR 
j  STORAGE  BATTERY  COH"AINERS  AND  OTHER  ARTICLES,  of  Whioh 
|  the  following  is  a  specification: - 

Si : 

|  My  invention  relates  to  the  provision  of  an  in- 

I.  aulating  and  protective  oovSring  or  ooating  for  artioles  of 
|  various  kinds ,  and  more  particularly  to  the  provision  of 
I  such  a  ooating  for  metal  storage  Battery  oans  or  oontain- 
5  ors>  and  for  the  trays  in  whioh  the  storage  battery  oolls 
j  are  assembled. 

I  In  storage  batteries  of  the  Edison  type,  the 

j  oan  or  container  is  made  of  steel,  and  may  or  may  not  be 
j'niokel -plated  on  the  exterior.  It  is  desirable  to  pro- 
]  vide  a  protective  and  insulating  ooating  upon  the  exter- 
I  iors  of  these  oans  or  containers,  and  in  the  praotioo  of 
j.  my  invention  as- applied  to  suoh  oans  or  containers,  I 
j  proceed  as  follows:  A  very  adherent,  flexible  and  rela- 

|  tively  soft,  preliminary  or  first  ooating  is  provided 
j4  preferably  in  the  following  manner:-  A  solution  oonsist- 
|  ing  of  a  substanoe  of  asphaltio  nature  dissolved  in  a  suit- 
|  able  solvent  is  prepared,  and  the  oan  or  container  dipped 
j  therein  so  as  to  immerse  as  muoh  of  the  oan  as  it  iB  desired 


(1) 


I!" 

ij' 


to  ooat.  The  solvent  la  permitted  to  evaporate .leaving 
the  oan  cr  container  ooated  with  a  layer  of  the  soft 
roBiduum  of  asphalt ia  nature.  I  have  found  that  arti¬ 
ficial  asphalts,  such  as  byerlyte  and  parolite,  dissolved 
in  benzine,  form  excellent  solutions  for  this  purpose. 

The  solution  for  the  preliminary  or  first  ooating  displaces 
all  air  from  the  surfaoo  of  the  oan  or  oonteiner,  and  after 
evaporation  of  the  solvent  there  is  left  a  very  adherent, 
flexible  and  relatively  soft  coating  upon  the  oan  or  con¬ 
tainer.  This  ooeting  has  insulating  properties  and  is 
not  attaoked  by  tho  potash  or  other  strong  alkalis  v/hioh 
are  contained  in  electrolytes  of  storage  batteries. 


After  the  preliminary  or  first  ooating  is  dry, 
j  tho  oan  or  container  is  dipped  into  a  hot  molten  insulating 
f  compound  containing  a  halogen  derivative  of  naphthalene  so 
|!  as  to  immerse  the  portion  of  the  oan  previously  ooated. 


The  oompound  preferably  employed  is  oalled  "tetrol"  and 
oonsists  of  tetra-ohloro-naphthalene  and  asphalt.  The 
term  "tetra-ohloro-naphthalene"  is  a  trade  designation  for 
a  produot  formed  by  the  ohlorination  of  naphthalene,  which 
crystallizes  as  a  felt  of  flexible,  fibrous  orystals.  It 
is  apparently  a  mixture  of  various  ohlorine  substitution 
produots  of  naphthalene,  probably  the  tri-,  tetra-,  and 
penta-ohloro -naphthalenes,  having  substantially  the  same 
average  composition  as  tetra-ohloro-naphthalene.  Tetrol 
is  prepared  by  melting  together  suitable  quantities  of 
either  orude  or  pure  tetra-ohloro-naphthalene  and  asphalt. 
Tho  preferred  proportions  for  the  tetrol  are  2  pounds  of 


(2) 


.A„  Californio  ...halt  on!  iu  ,—  «  *“*  t.tro-.blo.o- 

i  melted  tetrol,  ond  permitting  It  to  cool.  «  1=  *»“  -•  '| 

f  oovered  „ith  an  additional  War  on  oonti.E  of  a  ratoon  and 
|  and  durable ,  insulating  and  protaoting  .<*.«»•.  1  »»™  | 

i  Joans  that  a  suitable  »»«•  °*  *“  odd1'10”01  ”  | 

t  ...tins  for  storage  battery,  .an.  -y  *.  ^  ^ 

I  ing  the  prall.in.rilp  eoat.d  .an  to  a  ta.p.ratura  of  about 

T  J.  and  dipping  «  «0  *"«  * 

[  of  about  «.•  but  the  prooese  »»y  b.  oarri.d  on  .. 

S  other  temperatures.  I 

1  Ph.  layer  or  ...ting  of  tetr.l  1.  tough  and  j 

I  flanibl.  even  at  la.  ta.peratura.  and  doe.  not  ba.o.a  .oft  | 

!'  on  Btlohy  until  heated  oon.idar.bly  above  ordinary  te.para- 

S:  tunes.  It  i.  u«t  POfona.  and  «  ™«  attaoh.S  by  ..id.  or 
j  alltali.,  even  uhen  the  ooida  or  alltali,  ora  hot.  ■ 1 

'  l‘  applloation  Serial  Bo.  604,926.  filed  d*n»ory  .  • 

f  have  desorib.d  and  ol.i.ed  thl.  in.ulatiug  o.»po«»d  «“| 
|  method  of  mating  it . 

S  man  tetrol  i.  applied  direotly  to  artlolo. 

)■  to  0.  ooated,  ...h  a.  .an.  or  oont.iner.  »ad.  of  steal.  «  | 
i.  liable  to  ..rip  off-  m  to  ...h  .tripping 

i  off  i.  ov.ro...  by  th,  ...  of  the  prali.in.ry  ...ting  «bi.h 
S  l8  a  Btiohy  nature  and  very  Cerent,  and  .blob  i.  *P- 
plied  fro.  a  ll.uid  .bio"  *■“  di.plao.d  all  of  the  air  on 
the  aurfaoe  of  th.  artiole.  - 
l  ing  1.  vary  adha.lv,  and  oannot  be  .tripped  off  *o» 

!  etegi.  The  tetrol  adhere,  perfectly  t.  th.  preliminary 
j  or  first  ...ting  and  th.  t.o  .eating,  for.  a  single  .... 


(3) 


posits  ooating  whioh  oannot  be  stripped  off. 

My  improved  prpoess  is  applioable  to  other  . 
articles  of  various  fcinds,  such  as  wooden  or  metal  trays 
for  storage  battery  oells,  oonduoting  wires,  armatures, 
and  armature  and  other  ooils,  end  may  be  oarried  out  in 
the  manner  hereinbefore  described  in  oonneotion  with  the 
floating  of  storage  battery  oans  or  oontainers. 

i  Having  now  deooribod  my  invention,  what  X  claim 

as  new  therein  and  desire  to  proteot  by  Letters  Patent  is 
as  follows 

1.  The  prooess  of  providing  ah  article  with  an 
insulating  floating,  whioh  oonsists  in  first  applying  a 

il  ooating  of  adherent  material  to  the  artiole,  and  then 
I  applying  a  ooating  oontainihg  a  halogen  derivative  of 
j  naphthalene,  substantially  as  set  forth. 

2.  The  prooess  of  providing  an  artiole  with  an 
1  insulating  ooating,  whioh  oonsists  in  first  applying  a 

ooating  of  adherent  material  to  the  artiole,  and  then 
|  applying  a  ooating  oontaining  a  ohlorine  derivative  of 
|  naphthalene,  substantially  as  set  forth. 

|  3,  The  process  of  providing  an  article  with  an 

jj  insulating  ooating,  whioh  oonsiBts  in  first  applying  a 
I  ooating  of  adherent  material  to  the  artiole,  and  then 
applying  a  ooating  oontaining  tetra-ohloro-naphthalene, 
substantially  as  set  forth. 

;j  4,  The  prooess  of  providing  an  article  with  an 

insulating  ooating,  whioh  oonsists  in  first  applying  a 


(4) 


ooating  of  adherent  material  to  the  artiole,  and  then  apply¬ 
ing  a  ooating  oontaining  totra-ohlom-naphthalene  and  an 
amorphous  Bubetanoe,  substantially  as  set  forth. 

5.  The  prooess  of  providing  an  artiole  with  an 
insulating  ooating,  whioh  consists  in  first  applying  a 

..  ooating  of  adherent  material  to  the  article,  and  then 
|  applying  a  ooating  oontaining  tetra-chloro-naphthalene 
f  and  asphalt,  substantially  ns  set  forth. 

6.  The  prooess  of  providing  an  artiole  with  an 
}  insulating  ooating,  whioh  consists  in  first  applying  a' 

I  ooating  of  adherent  material  to  the  artiole  from  a  solu- 
|  tion  adapted  to  displaoe  all  of  the  air  from  the  surface 
|  of  the  artiole,  and  then  applying  a  ooating  oontaining 
i!  a  halogen  derivative  of  naphthalene,  substantially  as 
!  set  forth. 

!  7.  .  The  prooess  of  providing  an  article  with  an’ 

insulating  ooating,  7/hi  oh  oonsists  in  first  applying  a 
ooating  of  adherent  material  to  the  article  from  a  solu- 
| ' ution  adapted  to  displaoe  all  of  the  air  from  the  Burfaoe 
ij  of  the  artiole,  and  then  applying  a  ooating  oontaining 
j|  a  chlorine  derivative  of  naphthalene,  substantially  as 
S  set  forth. 

i|  8.  The  prooess  of  providing  an  artiole  with  an 

|j  insulating  ooating,  whioh  oonsiBts  in  first  applying  a 
ij  ooating  of  adherent  material  to  the  artiole  from  a  solu- 
jj  tion  adapted  to  displaoe  all  of  the  air  from  the  surfaoe 
j  of  the  artiole,  and  then  applying  a  ooating  oontaining 
ji  tetra-ohloro-naphthalene ,  substantially  as  set  forth. 


(5) 


j  9*  The  process  of  providing  an  article  with  an 

|  Insulating  ooating,  whioh  consists  in  first  applying  a 
J.  ooating  of  adherent  material  to  the  article  from  a  solu- 

jj  tion  adapted  to  diaplaoe  all  of  the  air  from  the  surface 

j  of  the  artiole,  and  then  applying  a  ooating  oontaining 
jj  tetra-ohloro -naphthalene  and  an  amorphous  substance , 

'  substantially  as  set  forth. 

il 

10.  The  process  of  prbviaing  an  article  with  an 
j  insulating  ooating,  whioh  oonsists  in  first  applying  a 
|  ooating  of  adherent  material  to  the  artiole  from  a  solu- 

ji  tion  adapted  to  displaoe  all  of  the  air  from  the  surface 

SI  of  the  artiole,  and  then  applying  a  ooating  oontaining 
j-  tetra-ohloro-naphthalene  and  asphalt,  substantially  as 
j  Bet  forth. 


|  11.  The  prooess  of  providing  an  insulating  ooating 

;  for  an  artiole,  whioh  oonsists  in  first  applying  a  ooating 
|  of  adherent,  flexible,  relatively  soft  insulating  material, 
!  and  then  applying  a  ooating  oontaining  tetra-ohloro- 
naphthalene,  substantially  as  set  forth. 

12.  The  prooess  of  providing  an  insulating  ooating 
e  for  an  artiole,  whioh  consists  in  first  applying  a  ooating 

i 

|j-  of  adherent,  flexible,  relatively  soft,  insulating  material 
jj  and  then  applying  a  ooating  oontaining  tetra-ohloro- 
1  naphthalene  and  asphalt,  substantially  as  set  forth. 

|  13.  The  prooess  of -providing  an  artiole  with  an 

|i  insulating  ooating,  whioh  oonsistB  in  first  applying  a 
jj  solution  oomposed  of  an  adherent  material  of  asphaltio 
|  nature  dissolved  in  a  volatile  solvent,  permitting  the 
|  solvent  to  evaporate,  and  then  applying  a  ooating  oon- 
| 


(6) 


jj  taining  a  halogen  derivative  of  naphthalene,  substantially 
:j  as  set  forth. 

14.  The  prooess  of  providing  an  artiola  with  an 
|;  insulating  ooating.whioh  oonsists  in  first  applying  a 
j  solution  composed  of  an  adherent  material  of  asphaltio 
;j  natwro  dissolved  in  a  volatile  solvent,  permitting  the 
|  solvent  to  evaporate,  and  then  applying  a  floating  oon- 
I  taining  a  oiilorino  derivative  of  naphthalene,  substantially 
I  as  set  forth. 

i. 

'j.  15.  The  prooess  of  providing  an  artiole  with  an 

|  insulating  ooating,whioh  oonsists  in  first  applying  a 
j  solution  oomposed  of  an  adherent  material  of  asphaltio 
j  nature  dissolved  in  a  volatile  solvent,  permitting  the 
!!  •  solvent  to  evaporate,  and  then  applying  a  coating  oon- 
|  taining  tetra-ohloro-naphthalene,  substantially  as  set 

i! 

j  forth. 

j  16.  The  prooess  of  providing  an  artiole  with  ah 

j  insulating  ooating.whioh;  oonsists  in  first  applying  a 
i  solution  oomposed  of  an  adherent  material  of  asphaltio 
nature  dissolved  in  a  volatile  solvent,  permitting  the  • 
solvent  to  evaporate,  and  then  applying  a  ooating  oon- 
!,  taining  tetra-ohloro-naphthalene  und  an  amorphous  sub- ; 

|  stanoe,  substantially  as  set  forth. 

!j  17.  The  prooess  of  providing  an  article  with  an 

j  insulating  ooating,  which  oonsists  in  first  applying  a 
ij.  solution  oomposed  of  an  adherent  material  of  asphaltio 
!  nature  dissolved  in  a  volatile  solvent,  permitting  the 
|  solvent  to  evaporate,  and  then  applying  a  ooating  oon- 
jj  taining  tetra-ohloro-naphthalene  and  asphalt,  substantially 
j  as  set  forth. 


(7) 


J  18.  An  artiole  having  a  oomposite  insulating  ooating. 

|i  ’ 

ij  oomposed  of  an  inner  ooating  of  adherent,  flexible,  relative- 
i|  ly  soft,  insulating  material,  and  an  outer  ooating  oontain- 
|  ing  a  halogen  derivative  of  naphthalene,  substantially  as 
jj  set  forth. 

19.  An  artiole  having  a  oomposite  insulating  ooating 
;j.  oomposed  of  an  inner  ooating  of  adherent,  flexible,  relatlvo- 
|  ly  so ft ,  insulating  material,  and  an  outer  ooating  oontain- 
ii  ing  a  chlorine  derivative  of  naphthalene,  substantially  as 
'jj  set  forth. 

jj,  20.  An  artiole  having  a  oomposite  insulating  coating 

ii  oomposed  of  an  inner  ooating  of  adherent,  flexible,  relativo- 
jj.  ly  soft,  insulating  material,  and  an  outer  ooating  oontain- 
|  ing  tetra-ohloro-naphthalene,  substantially  as  sot  forth. 

21.  An  artiole  having  a  oomposite  insulating  ooatin(l; 

I 

ji  oomposed  of  an  inner  ooating  of  adherent,  flexible,  relatlve- 
!j  ly  soft,  insulating  material,  and  an  outer  ooating  oontain- 
j!  ing  tetra-ohloro-naphthalene  and  an  amorphous  substance , 
j  substantially  as  sot  forth. 

22.  An  artiole  having  a  oomposite  insulating  ooatinj; 
oomposed  of  an  inner  ooating  of  adherent,  flexible,  relative- 

ji  ly  soft,  insulating  material,  and  an  outer  ooating  oontain- 
|  ing  tetra-ohloro-naphthalene  and  asphalt,  substantially  as 
jj  set  forth. 

jj  23.  A  storage  battery  oontainor  having  a  oomposite 

insulating  ooating  oomposed  of  an  inner  ooating  of  adherent 
flexible,  relatively  soft,  insulating  material,  and  an  out a: • 
ooating  containing  a  halogen  derivative  of  naphthalene, 
substantially  as  sot  forth. 


(8) 


24.  A  Btorage  battery  container  having  a  composite 
|  insulating  coating  composed  of  an  inner  coating  of  adherent , 
ij  flexible,  relatively  soft,  insulating  material,  and  an  oute: 

Sf  ooating  containing  a  .chlorine  derivative  of  naphthalene. 

|...  substantially  as  set  forth. 

]  gr)t  x  storage  battery  container  having  a  composite 

|  insulating  ooating  composed  of  an  inner  ooating  of  adherent , 
'1  jioxible,  relatively  soft,  insulating  material,  and  an  outer, 
|  ooating  containing  tetra-ohloro -naphthalene,  aubetantially 
I  as  sot  forth.  .  ! 


26.  A  storage  battery  container  having  a  oomposite 
|  insulating  ooating  oomposed  of  an  inner  ooating  of  adherent, 
f  flexible,  relatively  soft,  insulating  material,  and  an  outei 
|  coating  containing  totra-ohloro-naphthalene  and  an  amorphous 


|  substanoe,  substantially  as  set  forth. 

ij  27.  A  storage  battery  container  having  a  composite 

j  insulating  coating  composed  of  an  inner  ooating  of  adherent, 
']  flexible,  relatively  soft,  insulating  material,  and  an  out- 
|  er  ooating  containing  tetra-ohloro-naphthalone  and  asphalt, 
ij  substantially  aB  set  forth. 


j 

I 

!i 


©atb. 

g>tate  of  iieto  fersep  } 

Couutj)  of  <£ssex  j 

,  tfje  abobe  nanteb 
THOMAS  A.  MDItfOH  .  .  ,  „  ^ 

petitioner,  being  tarty  Stuorn,  beposes  anb  gaps!  tljat  fje  is  a  citijen  of  tlje  Unitcb 

States,  anb  a  reSibcnt  Of  ilov/ellyn  Park,  V/est  Orange ,  Essex  County, 
How  Jorsoy, 

tljat  Ije  bcrilg  beliebes  Ijiinself  to  be  tlje  original,  first  anb  Sole  inbentor  of  tlje 

improbements  ittmsuiATiiiG  coatiugs  ron  .storage  battery  coiitaiiiers 
AIID  OTHER  /ARTICLES, 

bescribeb  anb  claimeb  in  tlje  annexeb  specification ;  tljat  Ijc  boes  not  Unoto  anb 
boes  not  beliebe  tljat  tlje  Same  tons  eber  fenoton  or  uSeb  before  Ijis  inbention  or 
biscoberp  tljereof;  or  patenteb  or  bescribeb  in  anp  printeb  publication  in  tlje 
Uniteb  states  of  America  or  anp  foreign  countrp  before  Ijis  inbention  or 
biscoberp  tljereof,  or  more  tljan  ttoo  pears  prior  to  tljis  application;  or  patenteb 
in  anp  countrp  foreign  to  tlje  fHniteb  States  on  an  application  fileb  more  tljan 
ttuelbe  montfjs  prior  to  tljis  application;  or  in  public  use  or  on  sale  in  tlje 
{Hniteb  States  for  more  tljan  ttoo  pears  prior  to  tljis  application;  anb  tljat  no 
application  for  patent  upon  Saib  inbention  Ijas  been  fileb  bp  Ijim  or  Ijis  legal 
representatibes  or  assigns  in  anp  foreign  countrp. 

_! ^  - - 

g>toorn  to  anb  subscribeb  before  me  tljis  ap  2-- 

iJotarp  public. 


[fteal] 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 
UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 


Thomas  A.  Tldiac 


WASHINGTON 


a/a  Trunk  L.  Dyor. 
Orange,  IT,  T. 


ease  find  below  a  communication  from  the  EXAMINER  in 


for,  IHSULATIJKr  COATINGS  TOi<  STORAGE  BATTERY  CONTAINER  ART)  OTHER 
ARTICLES,  filed  Eeb.  24,  1912.  #679,744. _ 


Thin  oaoe  hue  Loon  oxarained. 

Claims  1,  to  17,-  inclusive  are  apparently  mot  in  , 

°  / 

Ntitting  #797,702  Aug.  22,  1905  ( 91-61’,)  with 

o  y 

Stempel  #732,663  June  30,  1903  (same)  in  vievf  of  the  fact 
that  applicants  insulating  compound  "containing"  a  halogen  deriv¬ 
ative  of  napthelone  and  asphalt  is  covered  in  apjilicants  coponding 
caao  # 604,926  on  which  certain  claims  have  Been  allowed.  Hutting 
shows  a  preliminary  coating,  and  Stempel  shows  the  use  of  asphalt 
as  a  priming  oouting. 

Claims  1,  to  12,  are  open  also  to  this  objection,  namely  to 
the  priming  ooatlng  in  each  of  thoso  claims  is  attributed  certain 
functional  capabilites,  the  secondary  coating  is  defined  in  more 
or  lesB  preoise  ohomioal  torraonology;  (Query),  What  is  the  rolatiai 
in  any  of  these  claims  betweon  the  functional  capability  of  the 
first  aoating,  and  the  ohemioal  characteristics  of  the  Beoond 
coating. 

In  claims  13  to  17,  the  ohomioal  natur0  of  the  primary  coat¬ 
ing  is  oharactorized'by  terms  more  or  lesa  broadly  definitive,  but 
terms  whioh  are  responsive  to  tho  chemical  character  of  the  second 
coating,  hence  the  objection  does  not  apply. 

Claims  18  to  27,  inclusive  are  drawn  to  the  artiole.  The 


Edison  #679,744, 


claims  are  either  the  subject  ot  division  if  a  different  invention 
or  aB  is  moro  probable.,  simply  tho  description  of  tho  article 
father  than  the  process  and  consequently  not  patentable  over  the 
process  claims. 


IH  THE  UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 

Thomas  A.  Eaison 

INSULATING  COATINGS  FOR 
STORAGE  BATTERY  CONTAINERS 
AND  OTHER  ARTICLES 

Filed  February  24 ,  1912 
Serial  No.  679,744 

HONORABLE  COMMISSIONER  OF  PATENTS, 

SIR: 

In  response  to  the  Office  aotion  of 
May  S,  1912.  The  patent  to  Nutting,  797,702,  aesoribes  a 
method  of  treating  wooden  bobbins  to  make  them  moisture-re¬ 
pellent,  which  oonsists  in  immersing  the  bobbins  in  a  bath 
of  very  thin  shellao  ana  thereby  impregnating  the  same. 

After  the  surplus  shellao  haB  been  permitted  to  run  or, drip 
off  and  when  tho  bobbins  are  dry,  they  are  given  a  final 
coating  of  thick  shellao.  This  patent  does  not  die dose 
the  use  of  any  of  the  materials  employed  in  applicant's 
process.  The  patent  to  Stempel,  732,663,  relates  to  a 
method  of  applying  a  protective  composition  whioh  oonsists 
in  applying  powdered  asphaltum  to  the  surface  to  be  protect¬ 
ed,  fusing  the  aBphaltum,  and  then  applying  a  protective  cov¬ 
ering  in  a  oold  state  consisting  of  finely  ground  mixture  of 
asphaltum,  asbestos,  and  an  obstructive  material,  suoh  aB 
sand,  ground  stone,  pulverized  limestone,  or  kaolin.  This 
patent  does  not  disolose  the  use  of  a  material  containing  a 
halogen  derivative  of  naphthalene  and  doeB  not  disolOBe  the 
step  of  first  applying  a  ooating  of  adherent  material  from 
ja  solution  or  of  applying  a  solution  composed  of  an  adherent 


) 

j  Room  No.  300. 

j 

) 


(1) 


material  of  asphaltic)  nature  aiasolvod  in  a  volatile  sol¬ 
vent.  The  Examiner  also  refers  to  applicant's  o op ending 
applioation  Serial  Ho.  604,926.  whioh  relates  to  an  insu¬ 
lating  oompouna  and  the  method  of  making  the  same.  In  ap¬ 
plicant's  oo-penaing  applioation  there  iB  no  aisolosuro  of 
a  preliminary  coating.  The  Examiner  apparently  contemplate; i 
combining  the  patents  to  Hutting  ana  Stempel  ana  applicant's 
oopenaing  applioation  as  an  anticipation  of  olaims  1  to  17. 
The  manner  in  whioh  such  patents  and  applioation  are  to  be 
oombined  for  thiB  purpose  is  not  clear.  While  it  is  true 
that  in  some  aspeots  applicant's  present  invention  consists 
in  an  improved  method  of  using  the  insulating  compound  de¬ 
scribed  in  his  oopenaing  application  and  in  the  improved 
article  resulting  from  suoh  prooess,  neither  the  improved 
prooess  nor  the  new  article  is  disclosed  in  his  oopending 
applioation,  ana  it  is  believed  that  he  is  entitled  to  pat¬ 
ent  protection  for  his  invention. 

The  Examiner's  objection  to  olaims  1  to  12  inclus¬ 
ive,  namely,  that  to  the  priming  ooating  in  each  of  those 
olaims  is  attributed  certain  functional  capabilities  while 
the  secondary  ooating  is  defined  in  more  or  less  preoise 
chemical  termonology.  is  not  dear.  furthermore,  it  is  not 
believed  that  it  is  neoeBsary  to  set  forth  the  relation  be¬ 
tween  the  "functional  capability"  of  the  first  ooating  ana 
the  "ohemioal  oharaoteristios"  of  the  seoond  ooating.  Ap- 
lioant  haB  invented  a  new  method  involving  the  use  of  a 
ooating  having  certain  ohemioal  characteristics,  and  it  is 
believed  that  the  oharaoteristios  of  the  preliminary  ooating 
may  properly  be  described  in  physical  terms.  The  second 


Iiating  nooossarily  has  certain  physical  properties  by 
.rtue  of  its  ahenioal  characteristics. 

The  last  paragraph  of  the  Offioo  lettor  is  not 
ideratood.  -his  paragraph  reads  as  follows : - 

"Claims  10  to  27  inclusive  are  drawn  to  the 
artiole.  The  claims  are  either  the  subjeot 
division  if  a  different  invention  or,  as  is  moie 
probable,  simply  the  description  of  the  article 
rather  than  the  proaess  and  consequently  not  pat¬ 
entable  over  tho  process  claims. 

hese  olaimo  are  intended  to  be  descriptive  of  the  artiole 
nd  not  of  the  process,  and  it  is  not  understood  how  the 
xaminor  arrives  at  the  conclusion  that  the  artiole  claims 
,r0  not  patentable  over  the  process  claims  beoause  they  are 
.esoriptivo  of  the  artiole  rather  than  of  the  process .  On 
ihe  question  of  division  between  tho  proooss  and  the  article 
ilaims ,  it  is  to  bo  noted  that  the  two  sets  of  claims  are 
jlosely  related,  and  it  is  believed  that  they  may  properly 
jo  retained  in  the  same  application. 

If  tho  Examiner  should  again  rejeot  tho  claims  on 
tho  references  of  rooord  or  should  repeat  any  of  tho  objec¬ 
tions  contained  in  the  Office  letter  of  May  8,  1912,  he  is 
requested  to  state  his  reasons  for  such  rejection  and  objec¬ 
tions  more  fully  and  precisely. 


THOMAS  A.  EDI SOU 
3y 


f  range ,  Hew  Jersey 
Me y  5th,  1913. 


Hh-JS 


Div. -15  Boom..— 300 


. 4~ 


c/ 


'•  a.  8.  7.  n.  dnto  of  tiling,  ond  lltla  of  iu 

department  of  the  interior 
UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 

WASHINGTON  _ July-7*  -1-913. - 


— i’rarik  L.  Dyer.  - 
. Orange-, —H.-- 


Please  find  below  a  eominmuoation  from  the  EXAMINER  U 
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—ln8ulating-.-Coatinen-.f-©r--&torage--Bati.ery- Containers -and--othor--Jlr-tioleB. 


Responsive  to  letter  filed  Hay  0,  1913. 

Vho  oliiiMs  are  rejected  on, 
o  V'" 

Haarwunn  #492,197  Fob.  21,  1893  (91-70)  in  view  of  applicants 
allowed  oaoe  serial  Ho.  #0 04,920.  It  is  not  beliovod  to  involve 
invention  to  uubatitute/for  tho  "Anpliult  ltautio"  ol*  tliio  reference, 
the  halogen  derivative/ of  naphthalene  which  is  covered  in  tho  Baid 
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BYERLEY  AND  SONS, 

“BYERLYTE  ASPHALTUM.” 


Patent  Application  Files 


Folio  #  828  Storage  Battery  Systems 

Serial#:  681101 

Primary  Applicant:  Edison,  Thomas  A 
Date  Executed:  2/28/1912 


Folio  No. 


Serial  'No ..AlA? 


FRANK  L.  DYER, 

Counsel, 

Orange,  New  Jersey. 


petition 


®o  tijc  Commissioner  of  Patents: 

gour  petitioner  thomas  a.  edison 

8  citizen  of  tlje  miniteb  States,  rcsibing  anb  fjabing  a  Post  ©ffice  abbrcss  at 
Llewellyn  park,  Y/est  Orange,  Essex  County,  New  Jersey 


praps  tfjat  letters  patent  map  lie  granteb  to  Ijint  for  tljc  improbementS  in 


STORAGE  BATTERY  SYSTEMS 


Set  fort!)  in  tfje  annexeb  Specification ;  anb  f)e  fjerefap  appoints  Jfranfc  %. 
(Registration  Mo.  560),  of  ©range,  Mtto  JerSep,  W  attornep,  Until  fuU 
potoer  of  substitution  anb  rebocation,  to  prosecute  tijis  application,  to  make 
alterations  anb  amenbments  therein,  to  receibe  tfje  patent,  anb  to  transact  all 
business  in  tfje  Patent  ©ffiee  connected  tfjeretoitf). 


SPECIFICATION 


I  20  ADI  WHOM  IT  KAY  CONCERN:  j 

|  be  IT  KNOWN,  that  I.  THOMAS  A.  EDISON,  a  | 

|  oitizen  of  the  United  States  and  a  resident  of  Ilewellyn  | 

|  PBrt.,  west  Orange ,  Essex  County.  Hew  Jersey,  have  inventedj 
I)  oortain  now  and  useful  improvements  in  STORAGE  BATTERY 
|  SYSTEMS,  of  which  the  following  is  a  description: - 

f  My  invention  relates  to  eleotrioal  systems 

I  containing  storage  batteries,  in  which  the  battery  oharg- 
j  ing  current  is  derived  from  a  generator  driven  by  a  prime 
it  mover  liable  to  fluctuations  in  speed.  My  invention  is 
!  particularly  adapted  for  use  upon  automobiles  driven  by 
|  internal  combustion  engines  or  other  motors,  and  when  so 

!  uaed,  the  generator  is  driven  by  the  prime  mover  of  the 
ij  automobile  and  is  employed  to  charge  a  storage  battery 
when  desired,  the  said  battery  being  used  to  supply 
,  current  to  lighting  or  other  circuits.  Among  the  objects 
1  of  my  invention  is  the  provision  of  means  for  preventing 
!  variations  beyond  predetermined  limits  in  the  voltage 
1  impressed  upon  the  storage  battery  when  the  same  ie  being 
\,  charged.  My  invention  also  comprises  a  simple  and  effic 
|  ient  method  and  means  for  supplying  current  at  a  substan- 
1  tially  constant  voltage  to  lamps  upon  a  motor  driven  ve- 
S  hiol0.  Other  Objects  of  my  invention  will  appear  her.e- 

I  inafter. 

in  the  drawings  which  accompany  and  form  a  part 
of  this  specification,  and  in  which  lihe  reference  cnarao 


(1) 


\ 


tors  are  employed  to  designate  like  parts  throughout  the 
I  several  views  - 

ji  Figure  1  is  an  elevation  showing  an  internal 

!|  oombustion  engine  provided  with  apparatus  embodying  oertair 
j  features  of  my  invention; 

|  Figure  2  is  a  view,  partly  diagrammatio ,  of  a 

system 

|  storage  battery/ embodying  my  invention;  and 
j  Figure  3  is  a  view  partly  in  seotion  of  one 

j!  embodiment  of  my  improved  means  for  preventing  variations 
!  beyond  predetermined  limitB  in  the  voltage  impressed  upon 
;  the  storage  battery. 

j  Referring  to  the  drawings,  an  internal  oombustion 

|  engine,  whioh  may  be  used  to  drive  a  vohiole,  is  Bhown  at 
j  i,  and  an  eleotrioal  generator,  suitably  supported  is  shown 
|i  at  2.  The  generator  2  is  driven  from  an  auxiliary  shaft 
j  3  of  the  internal  oombustion  engine  1  through  pulleys  4 
•  and  5  and  the  belt  6.  The  olutoh  V,  oontrollea  by  the 
1  rod  8,  is  provided  for  olutohing  and  unolutohing  the  pul- 
j  ley.  4  to  the  auxiliary  shaft  3.  A  storage  battery  9  is 
| :  oonneoted  to  the  gonerator  2  through  the  switoh  device  10. 

|  The  devioe  10  oomprises  two  Blip  rings  or  discs  12  and  13 
'  fixedly  secured  to  the  shaft  11  of  the  generator  2  and'  in- 
j  sulated  from  eaoh  other  by  insulating  material  14,  ana  from 

!  the  shaft  11  by  an  insulating  sleeve  15-  The  devioe  10 

oomprises  also  a  member  16  of  conducting  material  shown  as 
a  diso  and  fixedly  seoured  to  the  shaft  11  and  insulated 
therefrom.  Diso  16  is  provided  with  two  eleotrioal  ooh- 
j  taots  17  ana  18  insulated  from  the  diso  16  by  the  insulat- 

|  ing  bushings  19  and  20  rsBpsotively.  Oontaot  17  is  oon- 

|  neoted  to  the  slip  ring  or  diso  12  by  the  conductor  21  ana 


(2) 


the  oontaot  18  1b  oonneoted  to  the  slip  ring  or  also  13 
by  the  oonduotor  22.  Two  elongated  members  23  and  24, 
of  oonduotlng  material,  are  pivotally  mounted  upon  the  disc 
j  16  upon  oonduotlng  studs  25  ana  26  respectively.  The  two 
!  members  23  ana  24  are  approximately  parallel  to  eaoh  other, 
the  free  end  of  one  being  opposite  the  pivoted  end  of  the 
other.  The  two  members  23  and  24  are  oonneoted  by  means 
of  the  spring  27  tending  to  oause  the  said  members  to  move 
toward  eaoh  other.  The  spring  27  is  oonneoted  to  the  mem- 
|  ber  23  near  its  pivot  25  in  any  suitable  manner,  as  for 

example,  by  moans  of  the  projection  28.  Spring  27  is  oon- 

!  neotea  to  the  member  24  near  the  free  end  thereof  in  any 
|  suitable  manner,  as  fbr  example,  by  a  threaded  member  30 
j  extended  through  a  projeotion  29  on  the  member  24  and  having 
ji  a  nut  30 1 ,  whereby  the  tension  of  the  spring  may  be  ad  justec  . 
'j  The  free  ena  of  the  member  23  is  adapted  to  oontaot  with 
jj  the  oontaot  17  ana  the  free  end  of  the  member  24  is  adaptod 

1  to  oontaot  with  the  oontaot  18.  A  baok  stop  31  is  pro- 

1  vided  to  limit  the  movement  of  the  member  23  away  from 

j! 

ji  its  oontaot  17  and  towards  the  member  24,  and  a  baok 
jj  atop  32  is  provided  to  limit  the  movement  of  the  member 
j  24  away  from  its  oontaot  18  and  away  from  the  member  23. 

5  Brushes  33  and  34  are  provided  to  oontaot  with  the  slip 
I  rings  or  aisos  12  and  13  respectively.  The  brush  34  is 
jj  oonneoted  to  one  terminal  of  the  storage  battery  £  by  a 
j  aonductor  35.  The  other  terminal  of  the  storage  battery 
ji  9  is  oonneoted  to  one  of  the  terminal  brushes  of  the  genera- 

Itor  2  by  the  oonduotor  36.  Conduotor  36  is  provided  with  £ 
switoh  ZT.  for  oonneoting  or  disoonneoting  the  oharging  olr- 


(3) 


1  I  ouit  to  the  battery.  The  other  brush  terminal  of  the 
generator  2  is  oonnooted  to  the  brush  33  by  the  oonduotor 
38.  Conductors  39  and  40  lead  from  the  terminals  of  the 
storage  battery  9  and  are  adapted  to  hare  oonnooted  aoross 
them  translating  devioes,  suoh  as  the  lamps  41  and  the 
spark  ooil  42.  A  switch  43  is  provided  for  controlling 
|!  the  lamp  oirouit  41,  and  a  switch  44  is  provided  for  oon- 
ji  trolling  the  spark  ooil  oirouit. 

Ij  when  it  is  desired  to  ohargo  the  battery  9., 

I  as  for  example,  during  the  day  time  when  the  lamps  are 
not  in  use,  the  switoh  43  is  opened,  the  switoh  37  closed, 
'}  and  the  pulley  4  olutohed  to  the  auxiliary  shaft  3  by 
means  of  the  olutoh  7,,  whioh  is  operated  by  the  rod  8,.> 
When  the  engine  1  is  at  rest ,  the  pivoted  members  23  ana 
I  24  have  the  positions  shown  in  the  drawing,  ana  the  oir- 
I  ouit  from  the  generator  is  interrupted  at  the  oontaot. 17, 

,l|  As  the  engine  1  speeds  up,  members  83  ana  24  tend  to  move 
|  outwardly  due  to  oentrifugal  notion,  ana  the  apparatus  is 
|  so  adjusted  that  at  a  certain,  predetermined  speed  oorres- 

!  ponding  to  the  minimum  voltage  to  be  applied  to  the  bat¬ 
tery,  the  member  23  makes  oontaot  with  the  oontaot  17,  the 
|  member  24  still  remaining  in  oontaot  with  the  oontaot  18. 

I  The  oirouit  from  the  generator  2  may  then  be  traced  as 

1  follows:-  Through  the  oonduotor  38,  brush  35,  slip  ring' 
or  disc  12,  oonduotor  21,  oontaot  17,  pivoted  member  £3,  - 
spring  27  and  diso  16,  pivoted  member  24,  oontaot  18,  . 

oonduotor  22,  slip  ring  or  diBO  13,  brush  34,  oonduotor 
|  36,  storage  battery  £,  oonduotor  36 ,  and  baok  to  the 
j  generator  2.  When  the  speed  of  the  engine  1  increases 


(4) 


to  suoh  an  extent  that  the  voltage  of  the  generator  2  la 
greater  than  ia  desirable  to  be  impressed  upon  the  stor- 
I  age  battery  9,  the  member  24  moves  outwardly,  breaking  the 
oharging  oirouit  at  the  oontaot  18.  The  outward  movement 
of  the  member  23  at  a  lower  speed  than  the  outward  movement 
of  the  member  24  may  bo  scoured  by  having  the  two  mombers 
23  and  24  of  similar  size,  shape  and  weight,  and  the  dis- 
.  tanoo  between  the  point  of  attaohment  of  the  spring  2£  to 
the  member  23  and  its  pivot  less  than  the  distanoe  between 
|  the  point  of  attaohment  of  tho  spring  27  to  the  member 

124  and  its  pivot.  Instead  of  providing  for  breaking  the 
oirouit  at  a  predetermined  inoreased  speed,  the  belt  £ 

;j  may  be  so  arranged  as  to  slip  when  this  speed  is  reaohed, 
jl  due  to  tho  inoreased  load  upon  the  generator  at  the  high 
|  voltage  then  generated.  When  my  invention  is  applied'  to 
an  automobilo,  the  switoh  37  may  be  kept  closed,  and  the 
switoh  43  opened  during  the  day  time  when  the  lights  are 
not  needed,  and  during  the  night  and  at  all  other  times 

I 

jj  when  lights  are  needed,  the  switoh  37  may  be  opened  and 
the  switoh  43  olosed.  In  this  manner,  a  souroe  of  con¬ 
stant  potential  is  provided  for  feeding  the  lights.  The 
spark  ooil  42  is,  however,  kept  in  oirouit  while  the 
jj  generator  is  running,  the  battery  £  tending  to  steady  the 
|  voltage  aoross  the  spark  ooil  42. 

!  Having  now  desoribed  my  invention,  what  I  olaim 

as  new  and  desire  to  protect  by  Letters  Patent  is  as 
j|  follows:- 


(5) 


1.  In  apparatus. of  the  class  described,  the  com¬ 
bination  of  a  prime  mover  liable  to  fluctuations  in 
speed,  a  generator  driven  thereby,  a  storage  battery,  and 
means  for  maintaining  the  battery  in  electrical  aonneo- 
tion  with  the  generator  for  speeds  of  the  prime  mover 
within  predetermined  limits,  substantially  as  described, 

S.  In  apparattis  of  the  olass  described,  a  prime 
mover  liable  to  fluotuations  in  speed,  a  generator  driven 
thereby,  a  storage  battery,  and  means  for  automatically 
connecting  the  battery  to  the  generator  when  the  prime 
mover  attains  a  predetermined  speed,  substantially  as 
described. 


3.  In  apparatus  of  the  olass  described,  a  prime 
mover  liable  to  fluotuations  in  speed,  a  generator  driven 
thereby,  a  storage  battery,  and  means  for  automatically 
connecting  the  battery  to  the  generator  at  a  predeter¬ 
mined  speed  of  the  prime  mover  and  for  automatically  dis¬ 
connecting  the  same  at  a  higher  speed,  substantially  as 
described. 


4.  In  apparatus  of  the  olass  described,  a  prime 
mover  liable  to  fluotuations  in  speed,  a  generator 
driven  thereby,  a  storage  battery,  and  oentrifugally 
operated  means  for  automatically  oonneoting  the  battery 
to  the  generator  when  the  prime  mover  attains  a  pre¬ 
determined  speed,  substantially  as  described. 

6.  In  apparatus  of  the  oIbbs  described,  a  prime 
mover  liable  to  fluotuations  in  speed,  a  generator  driven 
thereby,  a  storage  battery,  and  oentrifugally  operated 


(6) 


means  for  oonneoting  the  battery  to  the  generator  at  a 
predetermined  speed  of  the  prime  mover  and  for  auto- 
matioally  disoonneoting  the  same  at  a  higher  speed, 
substantially  as  described. 

In  apparatus  of  the  olass  described ,  a  switon 
oonprising  a  rotatable  member,  a  pair  of  members  pivot¬ 
ally  monn^hd  thereon,  and  resilient  means  oonneoting  the 
two  pivoted  robmbers,  the  said  means  being  connected  to 
the  said  members'-at  different  distances  from  the  pivots, 
substantially  as  de^ribed. 

7.  In  apparatus  of  the  olass  described,  a  rotat¬ 
able  member,  a  pair  of  members  pivotally  mounted  thereon, 
and  a  spring  oonneoting  the  twhnivoted  members  and  tend¬ 
ing  to  move  them  toward  each  othei^.  the  said  spring  being 
oonneoted  to  the  said  members  at  dif^rent  distances  from 
the  pivots,  substantially  as  described. 

0.  jn  apparatus  of  the  olass  desoribects.  a  switoh 
comprising  a  rotatable  member,  a  pair  of  mernbers\^ivot- 
ally  mounted  thereon,  and  an  eleotrioal  oontaot  for\^aoh 
of  said  members,  said  members  being  normally  biased,  °nb 
.  into  oontaot  with  its  oontaot  and  the  other  out  of  oon- 
I  taot  with  itB  oontaot,  substantially  as  described. 

In  apparatus  of  the  olass  deBoribed,  a  variable 
speed  generator,  a  storage  battery,  a  charging  oirouit 

ifrom  the  generator  having  therein  meanB  for  automatically 
oonneoting  the  battery  and  generator  during  speeds  be¬ 
tween  predetermined  limits,  a  oirouit  oontaining  trans- 
j lating  devioes  adapted  to  be  oonneoted  to  the  battery, 

1  means  for  oonneoting  and  disoonneoting  said  charging  oir- 
j  ouit  to  and  from  the  battery,  and  means  for  oonneoting  and 

(7) 


I.  disoonneoting  said  translating  devioas  to  and  from  the 
battery,  substantially  a3  described . 

Means  for  supplying  ourrent  at  a  substantially 
|  oonstant  voltage  to  lamps  upon  a  motor  driven  vehiale, 
jj  oomprising  a  generator  driven  by  the  driving  motor  of  the 
■jj  vehiole,  a  storage  battery,  means  for  oonneotlng  the  etor- 
j  age  battery  to  the  gonorator  during  periods  of  non-use  of 
j  the  lamps  and  at  speeds  of  the  motor  v/ithin  predetermined 
|  limits,  and  means  for  oonneotlng  the  lamps  to  the  storage 

'i  battery  during  other  periods,  substantially  ns  dosoribed. 

\ 

j  -H.  "he  method  of  supplying  ourrent  at  a  subs  tan - 

ji  tially  oonstant  voltage  to  lamps  upon  a  motor  driven  vehiole 
j  whioh  oonsists  in  oharging  a  storage  battery  from  a  generat- 

i 

j|  or  driven  by  the  driving  motor  of  the  vehiole  during  periods 
j  of  non-UBe  of  the  lamps  and  at  speeds  of  the  motor  between 
ii  predetermined  limits,  and  supplying  ourrent  to  the  lamps 
j  from  the  battery  during  other  periods,  substantially  as 
|  set  forth. 


®bis  Specification  sigtteb  aub  toitneSSeb  this  .2  f6*  bap  i 

jiLn.  f? .  <&<*■ 


MJitneSSetlj: 


2.  . 


©atb. 


dtate  of  J^eto  fersep 
Count?  of  Cssex  j 

THOMAS  A.  EDISON  ’  ^Je  alj0l)e  name*> 
petitioner,  being  buly  Sbtorn,  bepoSeS  anb  SapS  tljnt  fje  is  a  citizen  of  tfje  ®nitcb 
States,  anb  a  resibent  of  Llewellyn  Parle,  Y/est  Orange,  Essex  County, 
New  Jersey 

tijat  fje  berily  belicbeS  ijimSclf  to  be  the  original,  first  anb  sole  inbentor  of  tljc 
improbentents  in 

STORAGE  BATTERY  SYSTEMS 

bcscribeb  anb  elaimeb  in  tljc  annexcb  specification ;  tljnt  ije  boeS  not  fenoto  anb 
boes  not  beliebe  tljnt  tlje  same  tons  eber  Unobm  or  uSeb  before  Ijis  inbeittion  or 
biscoberp  tljereof;  or  patenteb  or  bcscribeb  in  an?  printeb  publication  in  tlje 
f&lniteb  states  of  America  or  an?  foreign  countr?  before  fjis  inbention  or 
biscober?  thereof,  or  more  tljan  tluo  ?ears  prior  to  tfjis  application;  or  patenteb 
in  an?  countr?  foreign  to  tlje  IHniteb  States  on  an  application  fileb  more  than 
ttoelbe  months  prior  to  this  application;  or  in  public  use  or  on  sale  in  tlje 
IHniteb  States  for  more  tljan  ttoo  ?cars  prior  to  tljis  application;  anb  that  no 
application  for  patent  upon  Saib  inbention  has  been  fileb  bp  hint  or  bis  lESnl 
representatibes  or  assigns  in  an?  foreign  countr?. 

_ i  .  SL  s  . — _ 

dtuorn  to  anb  SubScribcb  before  me  tljis bn? 

[deal]  “^otnrp  public. 


/ 


i v3 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 

UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 

WASHINGTON  June  21,  1912. 


Thomas  A.  Edison, 

C/o  Frank  L.  Dyer, 

Orange,  Hew  Jersey. 

^Please  find  helot 


flUM  SI  1.813 
.^A7/,!L  r  ! 


mutation  from  the  EX  AH!  HER  in  charge  of  your  application. 

nge  Battery  Systems,  filed  ’laroli  3,  1912,  Serial  ilo. 601,101. 


'fhe  Drawing  should  indicate  the  Storage  Battery  in  accordance 
with  the  conventional  showing  on  the  drnf toman  oliurt  opposite 
page  88 ,  of  the  Bui  os  of  rS'Aijtioe. 

Tho  drawing  chould  more  el early  indicate  that  the  part  42 
represents  a  nnark  coil. 

Division  in  required  Between  Clr-imo  1  to  5  inclusive,  9  and 
10  which  are  drawn  to  a  system  of  distribution,  claims  6.  7  ajld 
8  which  covers  specifically  a  centrifugal  switch,  and  claim  11 
which  is  drawn  to  a  method  independent  of  the  specific  system 
disoloBed. 

Further  action  on  the  merits  is  nostponed  until  the  above 
requirement  shall  have  been  conplied  with. 

A’  cursory  examination  fails  to  disclose  a  reference  for 
applicants  .specific "system. 


IH  THE  UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 


Thomas  A*  Edison 
STOHAGB  BATTERY  SYSTEMS 
Piled  Maroh  2nd,  1912 
Serial  No.  601,101 


) 


j  HONORABLE  COMMISSIONER  OF  PATENTS , 

s  1 5 :  '  ,  , 
In  responso  to  the  Office  notion  of 

June  21,  1912,  please  amend  the  above  entitled  oase  as 
|  follows :  -  •  V 

Cancel  olaims  6,  V  and  8.  | 

Renumber  olaims  9.  10  and  11  as  6,  7  and  0 
respectively. 

REMARKS 

The  ohanges  in  the  drawing  required  will  be  made 
before  the  application  goes  to  patent. 

Claims  6,  7  and  8  have  beon  oanoeled  in  partial 
oomplianoe  with  the  requirement  of  division.  Applicant 
|  reserves  the  right  to  file  a  divisional  application  covering 
(  the  subject  matter  of  these  claims.  The  Examiner  is  re 
I  quested  to  withdraw  the  requirement  of  division  between  clajj 
I  s,  formerly  claim  11,  and  the  remaining  olaims  of  the  appli 
nation ,  for  the  reason  that  the  method  set  forth  in  claim  8 
I  i3  so  related  to  the  subject  mattor  of  the  remaining, olaims 
I  (see  particularly  claim  7)  that  it  is  thought  that  al\  of 
the  olaims  now  submitted  may  be  properly  examined  in  the 
1  same  application. 

Aotion  on  the  merits  is  requested. 


(Grange,  N.  J. 
June  19 ,  1913 


Respectfully  submitted, 
THOMAS  A.  EDISON  . 
u.>  t<  tl 
his  attorney 


By 


1 AS  A 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 

UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 

WASHINGTON  .  .Gotobe*- lSr- 1913^ 


-SranJcL.Xfcrwfi 


'  '  noose  find  below  a  eommnnication  from  the  EXAMINER  in  charge  of  the  application  of 

...Thoaafl  A.  Bdl0O 

.Storage  Battery 


of  Patent*. 


In  response  to  amendment  of  June  20,  1913* 

It  la  not  clear  In  this  oaae  why  the  method  and  appnratue 
axe  bo  inter-related  that  they  combine  in  a  single  invention. 
Applicant*  a  attentlon  ia  directed  to .  the _deoi8ione  Ail  KoMohon • 
48  0.  0.,  258.  and  ia  £&  Srasoh,  122  0.  0.,  1048.  The  require¬ 
ment  for  division  between  claims  1  to  7  on  the  one  hand  and  claim 
8  on  the  other  hand  iB  repeated  and  made  final. 

The  following  patents  are  oiteds 

£r««-  §if4£  a>  1M’- 

Brben.  787.284,  Centrifugal. 


? /Xv^tJLG:  /Q-y* 

^  4-^cf  o^^‘^^ww--| 


,  JL.e-0  I 


Patent  Series 
Patent  Application  Files 

Folio  #  829  Electrical  Regulation 

Serial  #:  685206 

Primary  Applicant:  Edison,  Thomas  A 
Date  Executed:  3/8/1912 


Folio  No.  X*2  ‘f 


Serial  No.  J.lSi 


Applicant. 

. .  . faeOSi-n*/' . 


Address. 


Filed  ///:■•.  . . 


Examiner’s  Room  No. 


Assignee  . 

Ass’g’t  'Exec . Recorded . Liber  Page 


Patent  No. 


ACTIONS. 

Hi. 

w  /irtfte  it . 


FRANK  L.  DYER, 

Counsel, 

Orange,  New  Jersey. 


Petttton 


tEo  tlje  Commissioner  of  intents : 

gour petitioner  thomas  a.  suisotf 

a  citizen  of  tlje  ®nit£b  States!,  resibing  anb  Ijabing  a  ^pofit  ©ffice  abbress  at 

Llewellyn  Parle,  Y/est  Orange,  Ksaox  County,  Blew  Jersey 


praps!  tfjat  letters!  patent  map  be  granteb  to  flint  for  tlje  improbements!  fit 


ELECTRICAL  EECULATIOIT 


s!et  fortlj  in  tlje  annexeb  specification ;  anb  fjc  Ijerebp  appoints  jfranb  TL.  ©per 
(Registration  ^o.  560),  of  ©range,  i?etu  Jersep,  Ijis  attornep,  britfj  full 
potocr  of  substitution  anb  rebocation,  to  prosecute  tljis  application,  to  ntalte 
alterations  anb  antenbments  tfjerein,  to  reeeibe  tlje  patent,  anb  to  transact  all 
business  in  tlje  patent  ©ffiee  connected  tijerekuitij. 


'Ok-h-c.  TV, 


SPBCniOATIOI 


50  Alii  WHOM  XT  MAY  CONCERN: - 

BE  X1?  KNOWN ,  that  I,  THOMAS  A.  EDISON,  a  oitizen  i 
of  the  United  States  and  a  resident  of  Llewellyn  Park,. West  • 
Orange,  Essex  County,  Hew  Jersey,  have  invented  certain  now 
and  useful  improvements  in  ELECTRICAL  REGULATION ,  of  which 
|  the  following  is  a  description:-  •-  '! 

|  My  invention  relates  generally  to  a  system  of  j 

|  eleotrioal  regulation  in  which  a  source  of  current  of  non-  ! 

|  constant  voltage  is  used  to  supply  current  to  translating 
ij  devioeB  requiring  constant  voltage.  My  invention  is  j 

I  particularly  adapted  for  use  in  lighting  systems  where  j 

|  the  lamps  aro  fed  from  storage  batteries.  A  storage  bat- 
•ij  tery  after  being  charged  has  an  excess  voltage  at  the  begin-] 

\  ning  of  the  discharge,  which  is  called  the  -gas  voltage", 
j  and  as  the  discharge  continues,  the  voltage  rapidly  falls 
j  to  the  normal  rate  of  discharge,  and  thereafter  drops  only 
j  slightly  and  at  a  uniform  rate  until  the  battery  is  almost 
ij  completely  discharged.  My  invention  comprises  sensitive 
I  and  efficient  means  for  maintaining  a  substantially  constant 
voltage  on  the  lamps  or  other  translating  devices  fed  from 
a  storage  battery  or  other  source  of  current.  My  in- 
vention  consists  also  in  the  details  of  construction  and  | 
combinations  of  elements  hereinafter  described  more  fully 
and  ol&iiB6de 

In  the  drawings  which  aooompany  and  form  &  part 
cf  this  specification,  and  in  which  like  reference  charac¬ 
ters  are  employed  to  designate  like  parts  throughout  the 
several  views  - 

(1)  l' 


Figure  1  is  a  diagrammatic)  view  of  an  oleotrioal  I 
ays tom  containing  an  embodiment  of  my  invention; 

Figure  2  is  a  aide  view,  partly  in  section  of  a 
relay  adapted  for  use  in  my  improved  system; 

i’igure  3  is  an  end  view  of  the  same; 

Figure  4  is  a  plan  view  below  the  line  4-4  of  j 
Fig.  2,  showing  the  movable  oontaot  of  the  relay  and  a  j 

portion  of  its  spring  support; 

Figure  5  is  a  sectional  view  of  the  armature  of 
the  relay  taken  on  the  line  5-5  of  Figure  2;  and  J 

Figures  6  and  7  are  side  and  plan  views  rospeo-  j 
.  tiTely  of  an  electromagnetic  circuit  controlling  device 
j  adapted  for  use  in  my  improved  system. 

;  Referring  to  the  drawings,  at  1  is  shown  a 

|  storage  battery  or  other  suitable  source  of  current,  and 
j  at  2  lamps  or  other  translating  devices  requiring  current 
at  substantially  constant  voltage  and  designed  to  be  fed 
j  with  current  from  the  storage  battery.  The  lamps  2  are 
■  I  connected  directly  aoross  the  mains  3  and  4.  The  main 
J  4  i3  connected  to  one  terminal  of  the  storage  battery,  and 
|  the  other  terminal  of  the  storage  battery  is  connected  to 
. I  the  main  3  through  the  conductor  5  and  any  suitable  number 

j  of  resistances  HI.  R2,  £3.  M  and  Eaoh  °f  th®  r®' 

sistances  Rl.  HE,  R3,  Si  SS  ±b  Provided  with  a  by-pass 
oirouit  Bl,  BE,  B3,  B4  and  B5  respectively.  Bach  of 
‘  I  these  by-pass  circuits  contains  a  stationary  contact  and 
j  a  movable  contact  co-operating  therewith,  the  said  contact 
forming  a  part  of  an  electromagnetic  circuit  controlling 
device,  the  preferred  form  of  which  is  illustrated  more 
fully  in  Figures  6  and  7.  Each  of  these  circuit  controll 


(2) 


lug  devices  oomprisos  an  insulating  base  10  having  mooted 
|  thereon  an  L-shaped  support  11,  having  a  horizontal  arm 
secured  to  the  base  10.  and  a  substantially  vertioal  arm 
Whioh  servos  to  support  at  right  angles  to  itself  a  pair 
of  cores  of  magnetic  material  12  and  13  provided  with  coils 
14  and  15  respootively.  The  two  coils  14  ana  15  are  oon- 
j  neotod  in  series  and  so  wound' that  the  adjacent  ends  of 
I  the  cores  12  and  13  are  of  unlike  polarity.  A  carbon 
contact  16  is  mounted  upon  a  support  17.  The  support  17 
i  consists  of  an  l-shaped  member  having  a  horizontal  arm  ad¬ 
justably  secured  to  the  base  10,  and  a  vertioal  arm  oarry- 
|  ing  the  carbon  contact  16.  The  horizontal  arm  has  a 
■i|  siot  25  therein  through  whioh  is  extended  a  threaded  mem- 
|  her  26  having  a  nut  27  for  securing  the  support  so  as  to 
!  properly  adjust  the  contact  16.  with  reference  to  the  con- 
|!  taot  19.  An  armature  18  adapted  to  oo-operato  with  the 
|  magnetic  cores  12  and  13  is  mounted  upon  a  spring  support 
ij  of  conducting  material,  suoh  as  sheet  metal,  and  oonBist- 
ij  ing  of  an  upright  portion  20  seoured  to  the  vertioal  arm 
of  the  support  11  by  a  screw  24,  a  horizontal  portion  21 
ij  extending  above  the  ooils  14  and  15  and  substantially 
ij  parallel  thereto,  an  upwardly  extending  loop  portion  22, 

•|  and  a  downwardly  extending  portion  23.  The  armature  18 
is  mounted  on  the  Bide  of  the  downwardly  extending  portion 
|  23,  whioh  is  adjaoent  to  the  oores  12  and  13.  Upon  the 
other  side  of  the  downwardly  extending  portion  23,  a  carbon 
contact  19  is  mounted  and  is  so  located  ns  to  co-operate 
with  the  oontaot  16.  The  oontaots  16  and  19  are  normally 
I  in  oontaot,  being  held  in  this  position  by  virtue  of  the 
jj  elasticity  of  the  spring  support  of  the  oontaot  19 .  The 


(3) 


] 

j 

J 

il 

J 

I 

I 


flexure  of  the  spring  support  ooours  chiefly  in  the  loop  j 
portion  22  end  in  the  downwardly  extending  portion  25,  and 
by  virtue  of  the  loop,  the  flexure  is  distributed  throughout 
a  considerable  length  of  the  support,  whioh  contributes  ma-, 
terially  to  the  durability  of •the  spring  support.  Y/hen 
the  coils  14  and  15  are  energized,  the  armature  18  is  .at¬ 
tracted  by  the  cores  12  and  13  and  the  contacts  16  and  19 
are  separated.  The  screw  24  which  serves  to  secure  the 
spring  support  to  the  vertical  portion  of  the  frame  11  . 
serves  also  as  a  means  for  connecting  the  oontaot  19  and 
its  spring  sxipport  in  a  circuit.  The  threaded  member  26 
is  provided  with  a  binding  nut  28  for  connecting  the  oon¬ 
taot  16  in  a  circuit.  A  circuit  controlling  device,  such 
as  is  illustrated  in  Figures  6  and  7,  is  provided  for  eaoh 
of  the  by-pass  oirouits  Bl,  B£,  B3,  B4  and  35,  and  these 
oirouit  controlling  devices  are  shovra  diagrammatioally  at  j 

Al,  M.  M  and  25  2*  In  S*  howevor*  | 

eaoh  of  these  devices  is  shown  as  provided  with  a  single 
actuating  coil,  whioh  iB  the  equivalent  of  the  pair  of 
aotuating  ooils  shown  in  Figures  4  and  5.  Eaoh  of  the 
:  by-pass  oirouits  Bl,  B2.  M  Rnd  25,  contains  a  pair  of 
j  oontaots  16  and  19  whioh  are  closed  when  the  aotuating 
ooils  of  the  oirouit  controlling  devices  are  de-energized; 
and  whioh  ore  separated  when  the  aotuating  ooils  are  en¬ 
ergized.  The  aottiating  ooils  for  eaoh  of  the  oirouit 
controlling  devices  Al.  A3.  25.  M  aad  25  are  connected  in 
oirouit  as  follows;-  One  end  of  eaoh  ooil  (or  pair  of 
ooils)  is  connected  to  a  point  in  the  battery  through  the 
conductor  5,  and  the  other  end  of  eaoh  ooil  or  pair  of 
j|  coils  is  oonneotod  through  a  oonduoting  wire  Dl,  £2,  D3 
Ij  j4  or  15  to  a  fixed  oontaot  of  a  relay  01,  02,  03,  04  or  05, 


(4) 


ij  one  of  whioh  relays  is  provided  for  eao’n  of  the  dovioes 
AX ,_AE,  M»  M  ^  Ao  respectively.  The  preferred  form  of 
'  relay  is  illustrated  in  Figures  2  and  3.  This  relay  oom- 
jl  prises  an  X;- shaped  frame  .50  of.. magnet io  material  having  a 
j  horizontal  arm  60  and  a  shorter  downwardly  oxtending  verti- 
oal  arm  61.  The  horizontal  arm  60  is  provided  with  upward. 
Ij  ly  extending  projections  32  and  33  hy  which  the  relay  may 
ij  be  secured  to  the  side  of  a  vertioal  support,  and  with  down 
ij  wardly  extending  oppositely  ourved  portions  34  and  35 
j  whioh  are  adapted  to  partly  enoirole  and  hold  in  plaoe  a 
|  ooil  36.  An  armature  37  of  magnetic  material  is  extended 
jj  through  the  ooil  36  and  is  mounted  upon  a  horizontal  pivot 
Ij  30  attaohed  to  the  downwardly  extending  arm  61  of  the  sup- 
!j  port  30.  The  armature  37  is  made  preferably  hollow  for 
jj  the  sake  of  lightness  and  is  provided  at  its  free  end  with 
|  a  spring  extension  39  of  non-magnet io  material  oarrying  a 
|  oontaot  40.  The  spring  extension  may  bo  made  of  thin 
j  sheet  oopper  and  is  preferably  looped  as  at  62  to  afford 
!  greater  flexibility  and  also  at  63  to  afford  a  convenient 
moans  for  attaching  the  oontaot  40.  The  oontaot  40  may 
be  an  I-shaped  member  held  in  a  slot  64  in  tho  upper 
looped  portion  63  of  the  spring  support  39.  The  web  of 
the  I-shaped  oontaot  is  slipped  into  the  slot  64  and  the 

I  two  portions  of  the  loop  press  against  the  flanges  of  the 
I -shaped  oontaot  and  hold  the  same  in  plaoe.  A  oontaot 
mounted  in  this  manner  may  oe  easily  removed  ana  replaced. 
The  free  end  of  the  armature  37  may  be  slotted  for  the 
reception  of  the  non-oontaot -oarrying  end  of  the  spring 
I  support  39,  ana  the  latter  may  be  soiaerea  or  otherwise 


(5) 


i 

j 


I 

5 


secured  in  the  slotB.  A  oontaot  41  is  provided  in  the  j 
horizontal  portion  60  of  the  frame  30  and  is  looatea  verti- 
oally  above  the  oontaot  40  and  adapted  to  oontaot  there¬ 
with  when  the  armature  is  in  itB  upper  or  raised  position. 
Oontaot  41  is  insulated  from  the  frame  30,  and  is  carried 
by  a  threaded  member  63  and  looked  in  plaoe  by  the  nut  42, 
?he  threaded  member  63  is  iirovided  with  washers  44  and  a 
nut  43  for  oonneoting  the  oontaot  41  to  a  oirouit.  In 
the  oonstruotion  illustrated  and  desoribed  there  is  a 
slight  rubbing  between  the  oontaots  40  and  41  whenever  the 
oirouit  is  made  or  broken,  and  the  faoes  of  the  oontaots 
aro  kept  clean  thereby.  Armature  37  is  also  provided  at 
its  free  end  with  a  rod  45  of  non-magnetio  material,  suoh 
as  brass,  extending  therefrom  and  soldered  or  otherwise 
seourea  thereto.  A  weight  46  preferably  of  non-magnetio 
material,  suoh  as  brass,  is  slidably  mounted  on  the  rod  45 
and  is  provided  with  a  set  Borew  65  for  securing  the  weight 
in  adjusted  position.  The  oirouit  oontaining  the  oontaot 
41  extends  through  the  oontaot  40,  when  the  latter  is  in 
olosed  position,  the  spring  support  39,  the  armature  37, 


|  and  the  oonduotor  47,  whioh  may  be  soldered  to  the  arma- 
I  ture  37  preferably  near  its  pivotal  support.  As  a 
ji  part  of  the  magnetio  oirouit  of  the  relay,  a  screw  thread- 
I  ed  member  48  of  magnetio  material  is  extended  downward- 
jj  ly  through  the  horizontal  portion  60  of  the  frame  30  at 

Ithe  free  end  of  the  armature  37.  The  member  48  has. 

a  knurled  head  48’  to  facilitate  adjustment  of  the  same. 

|  The  member  48  has  extended  through  it  a  sorew  threaded  mem- 
j bor  50  of  non-magnetio  material,  the  lower  end  of  whioh 

I  serves  as  a  stop  to  limit  the  upward  movement  of  the-  arma¬ 
ture  37,  and  to  prevent  the  armature  37  from  ooming  in 


(6) 


j  oontaot  with  the  member  40  whioh  would  be  liable  to  oause 
I  a  flaking .  A  nut  49  threaded  upon  the  member  48  serves  to 

I  look  the  same  in  adjusted  position,  and  the  nut  51  threed- 
|  ad  upon  the  member  50  serves  to  look  it  in  adjusted  positioy. 
j  In  order  to  limit  the  downward  movement  of  the  armature  37,. 

|  a  stop  BE  is  provided  oonsisting  of  a  threaded  member  ex- 
|  tended  vertically  through  the  horizontal  portion  of  a  non- 
|  megnetio  bracket  51  secured  to  the  horizontal  portion  60 
|  of  the  frame  30  and  having  downwardly  and  horizontally  ex- 
|  tended  portions.  A  nut  53  is  provided  for  looking  the 
J  stop  52  in  adjusted  position.  fhe  relay  is  capable  of 
j  being  so  adjusted  that  for  a  predetermined  strength  of  cur- 
\  rent  through  the  coil  36.  the  armature  37  moves  into  its 


|  upper  or  raised  position  end  the  contaots  40  and  41  are 
j  olosod ,  and  when  the  strength  of  ourrent  deorensos  to  a 
||  oertain  predetermined  extent,  the  armature  37  drops  into 
!  it8  lower  position,  due  to  its  own  gravity  and  that  of  the 
j  vveight  46 ,  and  the  oirouit  is  oponod  at  the  contaots  40  ana 
j  4i.  --he  relay  is  adjusted  to  dose  the  oirouit  for  a  pre- 
'  determined  strength  of  ourrent  and  to  open  the  oirouit  for 
!j  a  predetermined  lesser  strength  of  current  chiefly  by  means 
|  of  the  adjustable  weight  46,  and  to  a  less  degree  by  the 

j  stops  50  and  52,  and  the  adjustable  portion  48  of  the  mag- 

|j  uetio  oirouit.  By  screwing  the  magnetic  member  48  into  a 

j  position  so  that  the  gap  between  the  free  end  of  the  arma- 

I  ture  37  and  the  lower  end  of  the  member  of  magnetic  material 
j  '  M  is  dooreased.  the  armature  will  be  moved  into  its  upwarc 
|  position  for  a  smaller  ourrent  strength  in  the  coil  36, 

!  nnd  viae  versa.  By  moving  the  weight  46  away  from  or 


(7) 


towards  the  free  end  of  the  armature,  the  armature  may  be 
caused  to  drop  int.o  its  lower  position  for  a  lesser  or 
greater  current  in  the  coil  36.  Furthermore,  upward  ad¬ 
justment  of  the  stop  52  tends  to  cause  the  armature  to  move 
upward  for  a  less  current  8tren6th.and  downward  movement  oi 
the  stop  60  tends  to  cause  the  armature  to  drop  into  its 
lower  position  at  a  greater  current  strength. 

Referring  (again )to  Figure  2  of  the  drawings, 
the  pivoted  end  of  each  of  the  armatures  of  the  relays 
Cl,  08,  03.  04  and  C5  is  connected  to  an  intermediate  poinl 
|  of’the’hattery  other  than  that  to  which  the  conductor  5  is 
|  connected,  by  a  conductor  29,  and  the  actuating  coils  36 

j  are  connected  in  any  suitable  manner,  as  for  example,  all  j 
!'  in  parallel,  or  all  in  series,  or  in  series-parallel,  across 
the  terminals  of  the  battery  1,  so  that  the  current  strength 
|  m  each  of  the  coils  36  varies  as  the  voltage  of  the  batt- 

'  ery  1  varies.  She  relays  are  so  adjusted  that  for  the. 

I  maximum  voltage  of  the  battery  1.  i.e. .  when  the  battery 

!  has  its  maximum  -gas  voltage”,  the  contacts  40  and  41  of 

j  the  relays  81.  08.  03,  C4  and  05  are  closed.  For  this 
j  condition  of  affairs  the  actuating  coils  of  the  circuit 

|  controlling  devices  Al,  M*  **'  M  end  ^  ar°  &11  enorBiZ- 
|  ad  and  the  by-pass  circuits  Bl,  B8.  B3  ,J5i  35  are  all 
f  broken,  and  consequently,  all  of  the  resistances  Bl,  H2, 

\.  h3,  M  and  B5  are  in  circuit  with  the  lamps.  These  re- 
ij  sistanoes  have  such  values  as. to  reduce  the  voltage  to. 
j‘  the  required  voltage  for  the  lamps  8.  As  the  battery 
j  voltage  drops  to  a  predetermined  value  during  discharge, 

|  the  circuit  of  the  relay  Cl  is  opened  at  the  contacts 

j;  40  and  41.  causing  the  actuating  coil  of  the  circuit  cen¬ 


ts) 


!j  trolling  devioe  A1  to  be  de-energized  and  the  by-pass  oir- 
s  0Uit  B1  for  the  reBistanoe  HI  to  be  olosea,  thus  outting 
j  the  reBiBtanoe  HI  out  of  oirouit  with  the  lamps.  The 
]  remaining  resistanoos  have  suoh  values  as  to  oause  the 
8  proper  voltage  to  be  impressed  upon  the  lamps.  As  the 
.j.  battery  voltage  drops  ,s.till  further,  the  relays  02,  03,- 
|  04  ana  05  have  their  oontaots  suooessively  opened,  the 

■  aotuating  ooils  of  the  devioes  A Z,  AS,  M  and  M  are  suo" 

Ij  oessively  de-energized,  the  by-pass  oirouits  B2*  M 


.1 


1 


j 


ana  B5  are  suooessively  closed,  and  the  resistanoes  R2,  j 
BS,  R4  ana  R5  are  suooessively  out  out  of  oirouit^,  ®a*£"ly 
taining  the  substantially  oonstant  required  voltage ./leav¬ 
ing  the  lamps  oonneoted  directly  to  the  battery.  The 
relays  are  so  regulated  that  when  the  minimum  voltage  at 
■which  the  battery  is  used  to  supply  the  lamps  is  reached, 
all  of  the  resistanoes  are  out  out. 

The  relays  01,  02,  03,  04  and  05  may  be  adjusted 
to  open  the  oirouits  of  the  devioes  Al,  A2,  A3,  A£  and  ££ 
at  suooessively  lower  voltago/'of  the  battery  by  properly 
adjusting  the  weights  46  of  the  relays,  the  said  weights 
being  looated  at  different  distanoes  from  the  free  ends 
of  the  armatures,  the  said  distance  being  greatest  in 
the  relay  01,  and  the  distanoes  beooming  suooessively 
smaller  in  the  relays  C2,  03,  04  and  05. 


|  Having  now  described  my  invention,  what  I  olaim 
j  as  new  therein  and  desire  to  proteot  by  letters  Patent  is 
I  as  follows 


A  1.  m  a  system  of  the  olaBS  deBoribed,  the  oombina- 
I  tion  of  a  souroe  of  ourrent,  translating  devioes  fed 
j  therefrom,  a  plurality  of  resistanoes  oonneoted  in  oirouit 


(9) 


between  the  souroe  of  ourrent  ana  the  translating  devices , 
ana  means  responsive  to  ohanges  in  voltage  of  the  souroe 
Of  ourrent  for  short-oirouiting  one  or  more  of  said  rb- 
siBtanoes,  substantially  as  described. 


|  A  g.  In  a  system  of,- the- class  desoribed,  the  oombina- 
j  tion  of  a  Btorage  battery,  lamps  foa  thereby,  a  plurality 
j|  of  resistances  oonneoted  in  oirouit  between  the  battery 
|  and  the  lamps,  oirouit  controlling  aevioes  for  the  re- 
.'I  sistanoes,  and  relays  for  the  oirouit  controlling  de- 
|  vioes,  substantially  as  described. 


C  3 .  In  apparatus  of  the  olass  desoribea ,  a  frame  of  V  'j  ^ 

magnetio  material,  an  ar mat  lire  pivotally  mounted  thereon, 
a  ooil  supported  by  the  frame  and  surrounding  the  armature, 
said  frame  being  provided  with  an  adjustable  portion  of 
magnetio  material  forming  a  part  of  the  magnetio  oirouit, 


substantially  as  desoribed. 


]  ^  4.  m  a  system  of  the  olass  desoribed,  a  variable  /U.  / 

j  voltage  souroe  of  ourrent,  a  relay  having  a  ooil  oarrying 
|  ourrent  proportional  to  the  voltage  of  the  souroe,  and 
a  movable  element,  the  position  of  which  is  dependent  upon 
•ij  the  voltage  of  the  souroe,  substantially  as  desoribed. 


^  5.  In  a  system  of  the  olass  desoribed,  a  variable 

voltage  souroe  of  ourrent,  translating  devices  fed  there¬ 
by,  f  resistance  in  oirouit  with  the  Bouroe  and  said 
devioffl,  a  by-pass  oirouit  for  the  resistance ,  and  means 
responsive  to  the  voltage  of  the  souroe  for  controlling 
the  by-pass  oirouit ,  substantially  as  desoribed. 


do) 


1C,  6.  in  apparatus  of  the  olass  desoribed,  a  oontaot, 
a  ooil,  a  pivoted  armature  aotuatea  thereby,  a  oontaot 
oarried  on  the  free  end  thereof,  and  adjustable  means 
for  oauBing  the  oontaots  tb  move  into  oirouit  closing 
position  for  predetermined  ourrent  strengths  in  the  ooil, 
substantially  as  desoribed. 

jj  C  7.  In  apparatus  of  the  olass  desoribed,  a  frame 
•  of  magnetio  material,  on  armature  pivoted  thereto,  a 
member  of  magnetio  material  oarried  by  the  frame  and 
I  adjustable  with  respect  to  the'  free  end  of  the  armature, 

Iand  an  adjustable  member  of  non-magnotio  material  carried 
by  the  member  of  magnetio  material  and  constituting  a. 
stop  for  the  armature,  substantially  as  desoribed. 

^  e.  m  a  system  of  the  olass  desoribed,  a  variable 
voltage  souroe  of  ourrent,  translating  devioes  fed  there¬ 
by,  a  plurality  of  resistances  in  oirouit  with  the  Bouroe 
and  said  devioes,  each  of  said  resistances  being  provided 
with  a  by-pass  oirouit,  and  means  responsive  to  the  volt¬ 
age  of  the  souroe  for  controlling  the  by-pass  oirouits, 
substantially  as  desoribed. 

9.  m  apparatus  of  the  olass  desoribed,  an  eleotro- 
raagnet  having  an  armature,  a  looped  spring  support  carry - 
ing  the  armature,  a  supporting  frame  to  whioh  the  electro¬ 
magnet  and  looped  spring  support  are  secured,  a  contact 
fixedly  secured  to  the  armature,  and  an  adjustable  station 
ary  oontaot  oo-operating  therewith,  substantially  as  de¬ 
scribed. 


(11) 


C  10.  in  apparatus  of  the  olass  described,  a  frame  of 
j  magnet io  material,  an  armature  pivotally  mounted  thereon, 
j  a  coil  surrounding  the  armature,  and  an  adjustable  weight 
for  the  armature  whereby  the  apparatus  may  be  so  adjusted 
j;  that  movement  of  the  armature  will  ooour  for  a  predeter-. 

1  mined  strength  of  current  in  the  ooil,  substantially  as 
(j  desoribed. 

|  n.  m  apparatus  of  the  olass  desoribed,  a  frame  of 

'  magnetio  material  having  an  adjustable  portion,  a  pivotal- 
!  ly  mounted  armature,  a  ooil,  the  said  frame  and  armature 
fj  forming  a  magnetio  oirouit  for  the  ooil,  an  adjustable 
||  weight  for  the  armature,  a  stationary  oontaot,  and  a  oon-  J 
j  taot  oo-oporating  therewith  and  carried  by  the  armature,  j 
'll  substantially  as  desoribed.  • 

■j  12.  In  apparatus  of  the  olass  desoribed,  a  frame  of 

!  magnetic  material  having  an  adjustable  portion,  a  pivotal- 
!  iy  mounted  armature,  a  ooil.  the  said  frame  and  armature  , 

|  forming  a  magnetic  oirouit  for  the  ooil.  an  adjustable 
j  weight  for  the  armature,  adjustable  stops  for  the  armature, 

I  B  stationary  oontaot,  and  a  oontaot  os-operating  therewith  | 
j  and  carried  by  the  armature,  substantially  as  desoribed.  j 


W)i*  specification  Signet]  anb  UritneSSeb  this  Td  bn?  of  191  1 


. XiLr 


— -■ 


l.  ~0<=L . 

2 . 


©atb. 


&tate  of  iJebJ  Jersey 
Count?'  of  CSSex  ) 

ramus  A.  hd I;-; on  .  fte  abotoe  nmneb 
petitioner,  bents  Mu  beponen  „«»  a*  tljnt  be  «  n  eitifen  ot  Hje  Wnitet. 
states,  anb  a  rcSibcnt  of  Llowollyn  Bark,  T<est  Orange,  Essex  County, 
Hew  Jersey 


tUat  ije  berilij  beliebes  fttafttt  to  be  tfjc  original,  first  anb  sole  Mentor  of  the 
impeobemetits  in 


ELECTRICAL  RHGULATIOH 


bcScribeb  anb  data*  in  tfjc  annexeb  Specification;  that  ijc  bocs  not  Unoto  anb 
bocs  not  bcliebe  tfjat  tfjc  same  toaS  eber  fenoton  or  useb  before  fjiS  Mention  or 
biscoberu  thereof ;  or  patenteb  or  beScribeb  in  an?  printeb  publication  m  tfjc 
tHniteb  states  of  America  or  any  foreign  country  before  ijis  Mention  or 
biscobery  thereof,  or  more  than  ttoo  years  prior  lo  this  application;  or  patenteb 
in  any  country  foreign  to  the  fHniteb  states  on  an  application  fileb  more  than 
tbielbe  months  prior  to  this  application;  or  in  public  use  or  on  sale  m  je 
llniteb  states  for  more  than  ttoo  years  prior  to  tfjis  application;  anb  fljat  no 
application  for  patent  upon  Saib  Mention  has  been  Web  by  him  or  htS  legal 
representatibes  or  assigns  in  any  foreign  country. 


[fteal] 


g,b)orn  to  anb  Subscribeb  before  me  this  ^  bayrf  9\^ 

^  Rotary  public. 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 
UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 

WASH  I NGTON  October  21,  1912. 

Thomas  A.  Edison, 


o/o  Frank  L.  Dyor, 

Orange,  H.  J. 


ocr  si  191? 

,  'WaILEU' 


Page  8,  line  8,  "8"  should  he  1 . 

Pago  9.  lino  19,  -voltage"  should  ho  voltages. 

Prior  to  action  on  the  merits  division  in  required  between 
claims  1,  2,  4,  6  and  B,  which  cover  a  system  of  voltage  regula¬ 
tion.  and  claims  3,  6.  7  and  9.  which  cover  a  specific  typo  of 
oleotronagnetio  switch  onpable  of  general  application. 

Division  is  also  required  between  the  switch  claims,  since 
claim  9  is  epeoifio  to  the  modification  shown  in  Fig.  9.  whereas 
claims  3,  6,  7  and  10  are  epeoifio  to  the  modification  shown  in 
Fig.  2. 

The  following  references  are  cited  to  assist  applicant  in 


dividing: - 

v  Drum, 
v  Skeen, 

✓  Unger,  . 
v  Clarke, 

v  cutler, 
French  patent  to 
✓  Fauset, 

J  Groveling , 

'  Bliss, 
v/  Currio, 

•/.  Cartwright, 
J  Bprong, 


814,304,  Mar .  6, 

6O0,°721,  Aug.  9,  B  „ 

'  aeQ^fi’,  Aug!  2®p  wiol  Regulators  Resistance; 
1,006'pi,  Aug.  24,  1911,  B  „ 

6D3.6472,  July  10,  1900, 

,/ 

377,436,  Sep.  3, 

644/409,  Feb.  27, 

B72,‘u27,  Deo .  8, 

401/332,  Apr.  16, 

618,’«&2,  Jan.  31, 

856/741,  Juno  11, 


1907,  " 

1900,  Systems,  Car; 

1896,  Regulators  Resistance; 
1889,  Switches,  Klootromagnstio; 
1899,  "  " 


Dlv.  -26 —  Room .. 10.6.  2—200  Paper  No 3 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 
UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 

WASHINGTON  . Itoy..l6*..1913.... 


Please  find  below  a  communication  from  ilic  EXAMINER  in  charge  of  the  application  of 

..Thomas... A. ..M1.8oni...aerlftl..HflL*..6.86»8M»..f.lle!l.lter....Sl4..1913,...f.O!f.... . 


.Electrical. Regulation. 


In  view  of  a  probable  interference,  applicant  is  required  to 


respond  to  the  requirement  for  division  made  in  the  Office  action 

L  cS.  *■/- 1 ■?'  *■ 


within  thirty  days,  or  on  or  before  Juno  16, 


1913,  mating  an  oleotion  as  to  the  invention  to  be  proseouted  in 
this  case. 


c  Jfp£*lc-v~ 


t>/ /■*//■?- 


M 


JL.  No  J,  G>7  °  ,  O  -  Cyyc^C^L  A-^12.,  /f/3 

o^uAa.'^~  3,  1^1  I  , 


Patent  Series 
Patent  Application  Files 

Folio#  831  Motor  Vehicles 

Serial  #:  685542 

Primary  Applicant:  Edison,  Thomas  A 


Date  Executed: 


3/8/1912 


'•^^•§??Polio /no.'  P.'S/  .,*' ....  /  Serial  No. > 

|ffiv 


Applicant. 

. ./?■  SeCtfCvix, 


|V-y-.  Title  .7n+U*  ,Zc^Cc*>/e*i 
iV:;  Piled  .**. 

'  Assignee 

Ass’g't  Exec.  Record 


Examiner's  Room  No. 


Liber  Page 


Zce^  •&&£&{,  * 


. - . - 

y  i/L'l  \v 

?Vvn>"  . 


prank  l.  dyer. 

Counsel, 

.  ("Orange,  New  Jersey. 


petition 


®o  tfje  Commissioner  of  patents! : 

gout  petitioner  tsiokias  a.  edisoh 

a  citizen  of  tije  Unite*  States,  resibing  an*  Ijabing  a  Post  ©ffice  a**ress  at 
Llewellyn  Park,  West  Orange,  Bsbox  County,  Hew  Jersey 


prays  tijat  letters  patent  map  be  grante*  to  him  for  tfje  improbements  in 

MO*OR  VEHICLES 


set  fortlj  in  tfje  annexe*  specification;  an*  be  hereby  appoints  JfranU  %.  ©per 
(Registration  Mo.  560),  of,  ©range,  J2eb)  Jersey,  W  attorney,  Utitfj  fuU 
potoer  of  substitution  an*  rebocation,  to  prosecute  this  application,  to  mafee 
alterations  an*  amenbments  therein,  to  receibe  tfje  patent,  an*  to  transact  aU 
business  in  tfje  Patent  ©ffice  connected  tberetoitfj. 


.True-* .  ft . 


SPECIFICATION 


j  TO  All.  V/HOM  IT  MAY  CONCERN: 

BE  IT  KNOWN,  that  I,  THOMAS  A.  EDISON,  a  citizen 
|  of  the  Unitod  States  and  a  resident  of  Llewellyn  Park,  West 
|  orange,  Essex  County,  New  Jersey,  have  invented  dertain  new 
j  and  useful  improvements  in  MOTOR  VEHICLES,  of  which  the 
|  following  is  a  speoifioation:- 

|  ijy  invention  relates  generally  to  motor  vehicles 

ij  and  more  particularly  to  improvements  in  the  running  gear 
I  0f  suoh  vehicles,  whereby  the  construction  of  the  same  is 
1  facilitated  and  its  durability  is  inoreased.  One  feature 
J  of  my  invention  is  a  motor  supporting  frame  adapted  to  be  I 
|j  readily  attached  to  the  axles  of  vehioles  of  ordinary  oon- 
I  struotion,  and  another  feature  is  the  provision  of  cushion- 
•ij  ine  or  shock-absorbing  means  for  the  motor  and  metal  parts 
j  0f  -the  frame,  so  as  to  prevent  crystallization  of  suoh  parts 

idue  to  shooks,  and  consequent  fraoturing.  As  a  ouBhioning 
means,  I  prefer  to  use  non-metallio  elastio  material,  pref¬ 
erably  fabrio,  suoh  as  felt-like  material,  canvas,  or  rub- 
|  berized  fabric.  In  my  improved  structure,  the  motor  sup- 
j|  porting  frame  is  separated  from  the  axles  at_  all  po.intfl_by. 

cushioning  material,  and  the  motor  is  separated  from  the 
j  frame  by  similar  material.  In  thiB  way  the  metal  parts 
I  of  the  frame  and  particularly  the  motor  are  proteotod,  from 

I  shooks  reooived  by  the' wheels  and  axles.  My  inventioij  in. 

eludes  also  means  for  roinforoing  and  strengthening  vthd 
1  vehicle  structure.  My  invention  oonsists  furthermore/ln 
the  combinations  of  parts  and  details  of  oonstruotion  here 
inafter  described  more  fully  and  claimed.  ,.  \ 


in  the  drawings  wnien  aooempany  end  r“™  “  »"* 
sf  tni.  opeolfioation,  and  i«  »»-  *“• 
j  ter.  am  employed  to  designate  line  parts  tnro.gl.oat  tne 

|l  several  views  - 

|  figure  1  ie  a  plan  view  of  a  motor  vehicle  em- 

|  bodying  my  invention  with  the  body  removed; 
j  Figure  2  is  a  vertical  section  on  the  line-  *-2 

1  of  Figure  1; 

J  Figure  3  is  an  enlarged  vertical  section  on  the 

1  line  3-3  of  Figure  1;  and 

*  Figure  4  is  a  rortioal  el.ratlon  snowing  a  portlo. 

j  0,  tne  roar  one  of  tn.  reniolo  snd  mean.  for  attaonlng  tne 

'  |l  frame  thereto . 

Referring  to  tne  drawings,  at  10  and  11  re.p.ot- 
j  iveiy  are  .now.  front  snd  rear  aria.  of  a  rentals  of  ordi- 
.  .ary  bonstruetion.  in.  front  «le  3fl  •»««“  “  “ 

steel  portion  1£  and  «  wooden  stiffening  »>■«.  16.  ■»*■*“ 
rear'rirle  11  inolnd.s  an  iron  or  steel  portion  14  and  a 
|  wooden  stiffening  portion  16.  mo  front  r.niol.  wle.ls 
1 !  are  snow,  at  16  and  17.  and  tne  rear  r.niol.  wn.ols  ..  IB 

i  and  19.  Kean.  »r  «“  “  m°”  “  ~ 

j  Tne  free..  for  o.«pli»S  *»•«»'  *“  K“t  ““ 

■I  res,  axlos  and  for  supporting  tn.  motor  ooneists  of  side 

i  members  SI  and  end  «««“  ~“M  M  “if ^ 

i  iron  or  eteol  ohopos,  preferatly  angles.  Kaon  of  tno 

side  members  61  and  66  »  “*  “nn”‘ea 

togstner  at  tneir  formed  end.  by  being  rire.ed  or  welded 
to  a  member  &.  mien  is  preferably  a.  iron  or  steel  .as  - 
i„g.  me  ends  of  tn.  ores,  member  66  «•  — »«*  *“ 


(2) 


aide  members  21  and  22  near  their  rear  ends,  but  in  front  | 
j  of  the  rear  axle,  by  riveting  or  welding.  The  ends  of  the l 
|  oross  members  24  and  25  ^respectively  are  secured  to  the  sid| 

1  member s  21  and  22  intermediate-the  ends  thereof.  The  mainj' 
j  portion  of  the  frame  consists- -of  the  side  members  21  and 
,  22  and  the  oross  members  23,  24  and  25.  Additional  stiff- 

|  ening  and  reinforoing  members  may  be  provided,  suoh  as-the 
|j  member  58,  whioh  oonneots  the  members  25  and  21.  A  block 
I  87,  preferably  of  iron  or  steej,  is  seourod  to  the  under  i 
'  side  of  the  central  portion  of  the  front  axle  10  by  clips 
I  2.Q.  The  bio  ok  27  has  a  horizontal  opening  therethrough  ex- 
|  tending  at  right  angles  to  the  axle,  and  in  the  opening  a 

•!  bushing  29  is  secured.  A  horizontal  pin  or  bolt  30  is 

-  |  extended  through  the  member  26  and  the  blook  27  and  serves 
j  to  oonneot  the  frame  to  the  front  axle.  A  nut  31  and 

/  washers  32  are  provided  for  the  bdtf  By  this  construe-  \ 

'j  tion,  the  axle  has  freedom  of  movement  relative  to  the 
j  frame  around  the  axis  of  the  bolt,  and  strains  in  the  frame 
I  structure  due  to  inequalities  in  the  roadway  are  avoided. 

'|  Elastic  material  33,  such  as  felt-like  material,  canvas, 
j  or  rubberized  fabrio,  is  plaoed  between  the  metal  blook  27 
i  and  the  iron  or  steel  axle  12.  and  between  the  oross  pieces 
j  34  of  the  dips  28  and  the  wooden  portion  13  of  the  axle, 
j  in  order  to  prevent  crystallization  of  the  metal  parts  due 
j  to  the  shocks  to  which  they  are  continually  subjected  when 

I’  the  vehicle  is  in  use.  Such  crystallization  is  liable  to 
cause  fracture  of  the  partB. 

In  order  to  sooxire  the  frame  to  the  rear  axle, 
the  following  construction  is  employed:-  A  member  40, 

,  preferably  an  iron  or  steel  casting,  is  provided  for  each 


(3) 


s 


I  of  the  roar  ends  of  the  side  members  21  and  22.  Each  of 
the  eastings  40  is  adapted  to  be  scoured  in  place  under 
the  rear  axle  by  olips  41,  42  and  43-  '?he  0ll»  &  imsses 
under  and  in  engagement  with  an  extension  44  of  the  oast- 
■ing.  The  extension  44  is  parallel  to  the  axle  and  has 
a  groove  in  its  under  aide  for  the  reception  of  the  clip 

1'  41.  The  dip  43  passes  over  the^ wooden  portion  15  of  the 
rear  axle  and  lugs  45  integral  with  the 

casting  40.  The  clip  43  has  nuts  46  for  securing  the 
|  oaBting  in  plaoe.  Eaoh  casting  40  has  an  opening  there- 
'  through  which  is  preferably  rectangular  and  extends  at 
I  right  angles  to  the  rear  axle.  The  rear  end  of  one  of 
|  the  sido  members  21  and  22  is  extended  through  the  open- 
]•  mg  of  eaoh  casting.  In  figure  4  the  roar  end  of  the 
I  Biae  member  22  is  shown  extended  through  the  opening,  and 
I  the  rear  end  of  the  side  member  22  may  be  reinforced  by 
j  a  piece  of  the  some  shape  and  material  riveted  thereto,  as 
j  shown  in  this  figure.  A  block  of  metal  4V  al8°  8*tena" 
od  through  the  opening  and  assists  in  holding  the  side 
member  22  in  place.  The  block  47  rests  on  the  bottom  of 
*  the  reotangular  opening  of  the  casting  40.  On  the  top  of 
the  block  elastic  material  48  of  the  character  hereinbefore 
'  described  is  plaoed  to  prevent  crystallisation  in  the 

metal  parts  due  to  shocks.  The  horizontal  flange  of  the 
j  angle-shaped  side  member  22  rests  on  the  elastic  material 
i  48,  and  the  vertioal  flange  extends  between  the  side  of 

!  the  block  47  and  a  vertioal  wall  of  the  reotangular  open- 

■  ms  in  the  casting  40.  Upon  the  horizontal  flange  of  the 
side  member  22  is  placed  elastic  material  49  of  the  oharao - 


(4) 


j!  ter  hereinbefore  dosoribed.  Bearing  member  a  50  and  51 
j  rest  upon  the  olastio  material  49,  and  olips  52  and  53 

Ipaaa  over  the  bearing  members  and  around  the  aide  member' 

22  and  blook  47,  and  are  seourea  by  nuta  to  rearwardly  and. 

|  forwardly  extending  lugB  54  and  55  integral  with  the  oast- 
j  ing  40.  The  side  member  22  is  seoured  in  the  easting  40 
f  by  the  olips  52  and  53,  and  the  side  member  21  i3  secured 

1  in  its  oasting  in  a  similar  manner.  The  clip  42  extends 

jj  around . the  bottom  of  the  oasting  40  in  a  groove  therein 
jj  and  passes  through  openings  in  the  horizontal  flange  of 
jj  the  side  member  22.  The  olips  41  and  42  are  secured  by 
j!  nuts  in  the  bearing  member  56  resting  upon  the  lower  sheaf 
|  of  springs  57.  Thus,  the  slips  41  and  42  servo  to  secure 
I  the  rear  springs  and  axle  together  as  well  as  aiding  to 
|j  o'lamp  the  frame  in  plaoe.  The  olip  42  is  put  in  plaoe 

I  after  the  rear  ena  of  the  side  member  22  has  boon  extended 

!!  through  the  opening  in  the  oasting  40.  The  struoture  for 
oonneoting  the  rear  ena  of  the  side  member  21  to  the  rear 
axle  is  the  same  as  that  for  oonneoting  the  rear  end  of 
the  side  member  22  to  the  axle. 

|  Upon  the  frame  is  mounted  an  eleotrio  motor  60 

|  by  means  of  brackets  61  and  62  attached  to  tho  oross  mom- 
|  tors  23  and  24.  Cushions  of  elastio  material  39.  of  the 
il  oharaoter  hereinbefore  deaoribed  separate  the  braoketB 

161  and  62  from  the  oross  members  23  and  24.  A  counter¬ 
shaft  63  is  also  mounted  on  the  braokots  55 ,  36  and  37 

I  seoured  to  the  frame  so  as  to  be  aajtistable  in  position  to 

reflate  the  tension  of  the  ohain  drives  64  ana  65.  The 

3L,  *-  <*-/*/,  * 

■|  braoket  36  is  mounted  on  a  member  ^Z,  oonneoting  the  oross 


(5) 


j  members  24  and  25.  Cushions  of  elastic  material  33  of 
the  character  hereinbefore  described  separate  the  brackets 
35,  36  and  37  from  the  frame  at  all  points.  Power  from 
tho  motor  is  transmitted  from  the  motor  through  the  chain 
drives  64  and  65  to  tho  rear  wheels  13  and  10. 

Reinforcing  means  for  strengthening  the  front  axlo 
•  may  be  provided,  consisting  of  a  tension  rod  70  having  its 
jj  ends  secured  to  lugs  71  whioh  are  attaohed  by  screws  or 
|  bolts  72  to  the  forward  side  of  the  front  axle  10  at  points 
Jj  substantially  equidistant  from  the  middle  of  tho  axle,  the 
jl  said  rod  extending  in  a  groove  around  tho  forward  face  4f 
ji  a  thrust  block  73  which  is  located  between  the  front  por- 
i  tions  of  the  dips  28  and  held  against  lateral  movement 
j  thereby.  The  block  73  is  pressed  against  the  iron  portion 
|  12  of  the  front  axle  by  the  tension  rod  70.  A  turn  buokle 
jj  74  is  provided  for  adjusting  the  tension  of  the  rod  70. 
jj  This  reinforcing  means  serves  to  strengthen  the  front  axle 
|  against  shooks  produoed  by  obstanles  enoountered  in  the 
jj  roadway  by  the  front  wheels-  in  the  forward  movement  of  the 
, i  vehicle. 

As  an  additional  stiffening  means  for  the  struo-  J 
.  ture,  I  may  provide  a  pair  of  tension  rods  75  extending  fron  j 
the  front  portion  of  the  vehicle  to  tho  roar  axle.  Eaoh  \ 
of  tho  rods  75  is  secured  at  its  forward  end  to  a  plate  76 
held  between  a  blook  78  on  the  front  spring  and  tho  vehiole 
■  body  79  by  bolts  77,  and  is  seourea  to  the  rear  axle  by  a 
plate  80  sedurea  to  the  under  side  of  the  roar  axle  by 
olips  81.  A  turn  buokle  82  may  be  provided  in  eaoh  of 
the  rods  75  for  adjusting  its  tension.  In  this  manner 


(6) 


the  structure  is  stiffened  ana  strengthened  against  shocks 
due  to  inequalities  in  the  roadway  and  to  starting  and 
stopping  the  vohiole.  Furthermore ,  the  tension  rods  M:  ' 
permit  tho  front  axle  to  turn  about  the  pin  or  bolt  30- 
wit  hout  distorting  tho  struoture. 

Having  now  described  my  invention,  what  X 
olaim  ana  aesire  to  seoure  by  letters.  Patent  of  the  United 
States  1b  as  follows:- 

1\,  in  a  motor  vehiole,  a  unitary  motor-supporting 
j-  ana  axlo\ooupling  frame  adapted  to  be  soouroa  to  the  front 
!|  ana  roar  axlos  of  a  vehicle,  substantially  as  described. 

J,  2.  Tji^'a^notor  vehiole,  a  unitary  motor-supporting 

j  and  axl e - o o upling\f r erne  of  iron  or  steel  adapted  to  be 
•|  secured  to  tho  front,  ana  rear  axles  of.  a  vehiole,  sub- 
|  st antially 'as  described^ 

|j  3.  m  a  motor  vehiole,  a  unitary  motor-supporting 

I  and  axle-ooupling  frame  adapted  to  be  seoured  to  the  front 
j  and  rear  axles  of  a  vehiole,  andmeana-for  readily  seour- 
I  ing  the  frame  to  the  said  axles,  substantially  i 
soribed. 

\ 

u  _ _ _  -  - ^\mo t o r -support ing 

j  and  axle-ooupling  frame (of  iron  or  steel  adapted  to  be 
I  secured  to  the  front  and  rear  axles  of  a  vehicle ,  and 
means  for  readily  securing  the  frame  to  the  sai\axlea . 

|  Substantially  as  desoribed. 


(V) 


i  motor  vehicle,  a  unitary  motor-supporting. 

'  and  axle^QOupling  frame,  and  means  for  scouring  the  frame 
in  fixed  relation  to  the  rear  axle  and  in  movable  relation 
to  the  front  axle ,  "substantially  as  desoribod. 

6.  In  a  motor  vehiole^-ja  unitary  motor-supporting.  • 
and  axle-ooupling  frame  of  iron  oir^e^teel ,  and  means  for 
securing  the  frame  in  fixed  relation  to"^eraur  axle 
and  in  movable  relation  to  the  front  axle,  substantially 
as  described. 

Y.  in  a  motor  veViole ,  a  motor-supporting  and 
axle-ooupling  frame  of  mWallic  members  and  adapted— be^ 
seourou  to  the  front  and  tear  axles  of  c\  vehiole ,  ana^non- 
metaliio  oushioning  means,  for  reducing  the  tendency  to 
crystallization  of  tho  said\membors  due  to  shocks,  sub-  ^ 
stantially  as  described. 

4  In  a  motor  vehicle,  V  frame__  secured  to  the ^ 

axles  of  the  vehiole  and  separated  theref'romAby  non-metall- 
io  elastic  material ,  and  a  motorWd  power  transmitting 
meohanism  mounted  on  the  frame  onV  separated  therefrom  by 
non -metallic  elastic  material,  substantially  as  aesoribed. 


3  secured  to  tjio 
i  separated  tWerei’rom^by  elustj 


3  h.  In  a  motor  vehiole, 
axles  of  the  vehiole 
rio,  ana  a  motor  and  power  transmitting  meohanism  mounted 
on  the  frame  end  separated  therefrom  hy\ elastic  fabric, 
j  substantially  as  desoribod. 

J  3 

jn  a  motor  vehiolo,  reinforoing  means  for  the 
axle  comprising  a  t1  Look  located  substantially  at 


jj  the  middle  of  the  forward  side  of~fhe-^a^.e ,  a  tension  roa 

!  extended  over  the  forward  side  of  the  block,  and: 

(8) 


for-a  souring  the  ends  of  the  1 


laion  rod  to  tho  axle , 


axle  comprising  a  thrust  bloolc  loontod  substantially  at 
the  middle  of  tho  forward  side  of  the  nxlo,  a  tension  rod 
extended  over  the  forward  side  of  tho  bio ol:,  and  lugs  se¬ 
cured  to  the  ends  of  the  tension  rod  and  to  the  site,., 
substantially  as  described. 

^  ^  'ig,  in  a  motor  vohiole,  the  combination  of  front 
and  roar  axles , oarried  thereby,  a  frame  connecting 
the  axles,  and  tension  rods^seoiired  to  the  roar  axle  and  to 
tho  forward  portion  of  t ho ^vehi^lo  above  the  front  spring , 
svibstantially  as  dosqribod. 


3  ^  In  a  motor  vehicle,  tho  combination  of  front 
and  rear  axles,  springs  flm1  a  body  mounted  thereon,  u  frame 

i/is/zy  n 

fixedly  secured  to  the  rear  nxlo  .apd  pivot, ttlte.i^qjired  to 
the  front  axlot^and  a  tension  rodAo6i>Poatinr  the  rear  nxle  ^ 
with  the  forward  part  of  tho  body,  substantially  as  de- 


'isi,  in  a  motor  vehicle,  the  combination  of  front 
and  rear  axles,  oprings  and  a  body  mounted  thoreon,  a  frt 

fixedly  seonroa  to  the.  rear  axle  and  pivotally  scoured  t( 
’’/‘S/iy  S//A-J 

the  front  axle,  and  tension  rodsA oonneoting  the  rear  axli 
with  the  forward  part  of  the  body,  substantially  as  de- 


(>  *-  7  7//f//  y 


©atb. 

gitate  of  i?elu  fcrScp  )  gg 
Count?  of  CSSex  i 

THOMAS  A.  EDISON  >  ^  nbob£  «««* 

petitioner,  being  bulg  Sbtorn,  bcposes  aub  saps  tijat  fje  is  a  citizen  of  tlje  Umteb 
States,  anb  a  rcSfeent  of  Llewellyn  I’arte,  West  Orange ,  Esse*  County, 
Hew  Jersey 

tijat  fje  berilu  bcliebes  Ijimself  to  be  tlje  original,  first  anb  sole  inbentor  of  tljc 
improbementS  in 


bescribcb  anb  elaimeb  in  tlje  annexcb  Specification ;  tijat  fje  boeS  not  Unoto  anb 
boes  not  beliebe  tfjnt  tlje  Same  toas  eber  fenobm  or  useb  before  ijis  inbention  or 
biscoberp  tfjereof;  or  patenteb  or  beScribeb  in  anp  printeb  publication  in  tlje 
fHniteb  States  of  America  or  anp  foreign  eountrp  before  ijis  inbention  or 
biscoberp  tfjereof,  or  more  tljan  ttoo  pears  prior  to  tljis  application;  or  patenteb 
in  anp  eountrp  foreign  to  tlje  fHniteb  ££>tates  on  an  application  fileb  more  tljan 
ttuelbe  months  prior  to  tljis  application;  or  in  public  use  or  on  sale  in  tlje 
XHniteb  States  for  more  tljan  ttuo  pears  prior  to  this  application;  anb  tijat  no 
application  for  patent  upon  safe  inbention  fjas  been  fileb  bp  Ijim  or  Ijis  legal 
representatibes  or  assigns  in  anp  foreign  eountrp. 

/?. _ - - 

gstoorn  to  anb  subscribeb  before  me  tljis  bap  of  191*--' 


Thomas  A.  JEdison, 

care  Frank  T,.  Dyer 
Orange,  J* 

Please  find  below  a  commit 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 
UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 

WASHINGTON  May  22 » 

u.  S.  PATENT  OFFICE, 

2  3  /  MAY  22  .  '12 


limtion  from  the  EXAMINER  in  charge  of  you, r  application. 

for  Kotor  vehicles ,  filed  Maroh  22,  1912,  #606,542. 


/Page  3,  lino  16,  bolt  is  misspelled.  Is  clip  43  "threaded" 
into  lugs  45,  as  stated  on  page  4,  lines  V  and  87? 

The  reference  numeral  37  is  used  bottom  of  page  6,  and 
on  the  drawing  to  designate  two  unlike  parts. 

The  following  reforencoB  arc  oited: 


Willard,  Y12,829^Hot.  4^  Motor  Vehicles, 


Willard,  712, 829., /gov.  4,  1902,  l 

ss  J:  wool  ,  . 


fll aims  1  to  8,  inclusive,  are  rejeoted  on  Millard,  cited. 

The  frame  C  carrying  the  motor  is  connected  to  the  front  and  roar 
axles  with  rubber  cushions  interposed  between  said  axles  and  frame. 

giaia  9  is  not  patentable  over  Millard,  taken  with  Clark. 
The  former  patent  shows  thu  resiliontly  supported  frame, 
and  the  latter  patent  the  resiliontly  supported  motor.  To  combine 
these  two  supports  for  the  motor  would  produce  no  new  or  different 

result  and  would  not  involve  invention. 

The  patent  to  Lockwood,  cited,  shows  that  it  is  not  unusual 
in  the  art  to  place  cushions  between  the  motor  and  its  supporting 

frame.  Claims  10  and  11  are  not  thought t0  ntion^in^plaeing 
8?5is  braoe  Tthe  axle  if  the  axle  required 

a  braoe  ^a^llf^'and  14  are  rejeoted  on  Pearson,  cited. 


Ill  THE  UIII TED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE. 


THOMAS  A.  EDISON,  1 
MOTOR  VEHICLES,  ) 
Piled  March  33,  1912,  ) 
Serial  Ho.  605,543.  1 


Room  Ho.  335. 


HONORABLE  COMMISSIONER  OF  PATENTS, 

S  I  R: 

In  response  to  tho  Office  action  of 
May  33 ,  1913 ,  please  amend  the  above  entitled  case  us 
follows : 

Pace  3,  lino  25,  cancel  "Each"  and  insert 

-  Both  "  '  .  -  + 

Page  5,  line  16,  change  "holt"  to  -  holt  - 

Page  4,  line  8,  cancel  "threaded  into'. 

and  insert  -  secured  to  -  .  , 

Page  5,  lino  13,  change  "olipu"  to  -  cl  P > 

„„„  las*  lino,  change  "37"  to  -  36a  -  . 
same  page,  las.,  imo ,  u  i. 

Page  7,  lino  3,  change  "82"  to  -  7.»  -  . 

Claim  7.  line  2,  cancel  "and  adapted  to  be",| 

„  to  tho  -  ,  and  after  "and"  second 
line  3,  change  a  to  -  vno  , 

insert  separated  therefrom  at  all  points  by  • 
occurrence,  insort  -  separate 

Claims  8  and  9,  line  2,  after  "therefrom 

insert  -  at  all  points-  . 

Claim  12 t  line  3,  and  claim  14,  line 

after  "rods"  insert  -  directly  -  . 

Claim  13,  line  4,  after  "rod"  insert  - 

ly  -  • 


1  to  6. 


Cancel  ololr.e  1  to  5  10  arf  11. 

Bcnn.fr  .1«1»  7 .  8.  9.  10.  1=  ■»»  14  “ 


II 


und  roar  axles,  springs, an!  a  body  mounted  thoroon,  a  frame 
fixedly  secured  to  the  roar  axle  and  having  a  'single  hori¬ 
zontal  pivotal  connootion  wilSh  the  front  axle  and  u  tension 
rod  directly  connecting  the  rear  axle  with  the  forward  part 
of  the  body,  substantially  as  described. 

IQ.'  In  a  motor  vehicle,  the  combination  of  front 
and  roar  axlos,  springs, tund  a  body  mounted  thoroon,  a 
frame  fixedly  secured  to  the  roar  axlo  and  having  a  single 
horizontal  pivotal  connection  with  the  front  axle,  and 
tension  rods  dir’ootly  connecting  the  roar  axlo  with  tho 
forward  part  of  tho  body,  substantially  as  described. 


H  K  a  A  S  X  S 

Tho  Examiner  is  requested  to  kindly  change 
reference  character  37  designating  the  member  on  whihh 
bracket  36  is  mounted  to  36a. 

Applicant  is  aware  that  it  is  customary  to 
tho  motor  ot  a  vohlol.  upon  tho  v.hiolo  iramo  hy 
„,a„.  of  metallic  apri«0s  ••  tto  ro£""°" 


Clark  und  l>0ckwood.  While  such  a  mounting  is  doubtloBS 
advantageous  in  that  the  motor  v/ill  bo  prevented  from 
partaking  of  all  the  jolts  and  other  movements  of  the 
vehicle  frame  resulting  from  unevonneos  in  the  roadway, 

I  have  discovered  that,  where  the  connections  between 
metallic  structures,  such  as  the  axlos  and  framo  and  tho 
frame  and  motor  of  a  vohicle  are  of  metal,  ovon  when 
these  connections  take  tho  form  of  springs,  the  shocks 
received  by  the  wheels  and  axles  of  the  vehicle  act 
through  the  metal  connections  to  causo  molocular  displace¬ 
ment  of  the  matorial  of  the  frtuno  and  motor  and  result  , 
in  the  crystallisation  of  tho  parts  and  consequent 
fracture.  In  my  improved  structure,  the  motor  supporting 
frame  is  separated  from  the  axles  at  all  points  by  non-- 
metallic  cushioning  matorial  such  as  canvas  or  rubberised 
fabric,  and  tho  motor  is  separated  from  the  framo  by  similar 
material.  While  Hillard  discloses  cushioning  means  be-  . 

tween  the  frame  C  and  tho  front  and  roar  axles,  ho  also  I 

discloses  rigid  connections  M  betvfoen . tho  f ^ C  and  tho  __ 
roar  axle  ?  which,  connections  aro  entirely  of  metal. 
Consoquontly ,  shocks  received  by  tho  rear  axle  of 
Millard's  vehicle  would  be  comnunicatod  through  tho 
connections  H  to  the  frame  C  and  cause  crystallisation  of 
the  latter.  Moreover ,  Hillard  provides  no  cushioning 
means  botween  the  motor  and  tho  axle  coupling  framo  C. 

Uor  does  any  of  tho  references  disclose,  non-motullio 
cushioning  moans  between  the  motor  and  the  vehicle  frame,  j 
By  the  employment  of  non-metallie  cushioning  means  botween 
the  axles  of  the  vehicle  and,  tho  axle  coupling  frame  and 
between  the  axle  coupling  frame  and  the  motor,  applicant 
does  pro duo o  a  now  and  useful  result,  namoly ,  the  preven¬ 
tion  of  crystallisation  of  tho  partB  of  the  axle  coupling 


frame  and  the  motor  which  v/ould  otherwise  result  from 


the  shocksreoeivad  by  the  axles  of  the  vehicle. 

Claims  1,  2  and  3  specify  that  the  frame 
soeurod  to  the  front  and  rear  axles  of  the  voliicle  is 
separated  at  all  noints  therefrom  hy  non-metal lie, 
ouBhloning,  means  or  elastic  fabric.  Claims  2  and  3  also 
specify, as  do  new  claims  7  and  8, that  the  motor  and  power 
transmitting  mechanism  is  mountod  on  the  frnrao  soourod 
to  the  axles  of  the  voliicle  and  is  separated  therefrom 
by  non-motallic  elastic  material  or  by  elastic  fabric. 

Claims  4,  5,  6,  9  ond  10  apocify  that  a  tension 
rod  or  tension  rods  are  directly  soourod  to  the  rear 
axle  and  to  the  forward  part  of  the  vehicle  or  body.  In 
Pearson's  device,  the  truss  rods  P  are  not  diroetly 
connected  to  the  rear  axle,  but  are  connected  at  one  ond 
to  the  body  of  the  vehicle  and  at  the  othor  end  to  tho 
axle  coupling  frame  0.  [  Hods  P,  therefore,  will  impose 
stress  on  the  axle  coupling  frame  0,  wheroas  in  applicant’s 
device,  tho  tension  rods  relievo  the  axlo  coupling  frame 
from  more  or  less  strain  to  which  the  frame  would  otherwise | 
by  subjected  by  shocks  due  to  inooualities  in  the  roadway 
and  to  the  starting  and  stopping  of  the  vehicle, and  divide 
tho  strain  betweon  the  vehicle  body  ond  the  rear  axle. 

Claims  5,  6,  9  and  10  further  specify  that  tho 
frame  secured  to  ^  rear  axle  is  pivotally  secured  to  the 
front  axlo  or  has  a  single  horizontal  pivotal  connoction 
therewith.  The  connection  of  the  tons ion  rod  or  rods 

with  the  vehicle  body  and  the  roar  axlo  in  the  constr^tion 
J4.  front  axle  ,to  turn 

called  for  hy  these  claina  permit  the  iinF 

n  t  its  Pivotal  connoction  with  tho  axlo  coupling 
freely  about  its  piv 


Dlv.  -X-.  Boom  ...i 


(b)  ■’IS-JMSS*. 

DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 
UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 

WASHINGTON  Tilly  17,  1913. 


Prank  1.  Dyar, 

. Orange,-!!..- J»- 


S.  PATENT  OFFICE, 
JUL  171913 
DIV.  X. 

MAILED.^ 


Please  find  below  a  communication  from  the  EXAMINER  in  charge  of  the  application  of 

.<Ehomas..A,.Bdiaon,...for..lfatox-.Vahi0lee,..filad..Mhroh.22,...19.I2., . 


Amended.  Hay  10,  1013* 

She  following  additional  references  are  cited: 

Srenafa  patent  to  Pauloin,  381,969,  January  25,  1908,  Hbtor  Vehicles, 
it  «  n  Gautier,  1st  Add.  to  370,367),  Tan.  B, 

•  ^  1908,  Hotor  Vehicles,  (Prames) . 

Claim  1  is-  rejected-  on.Hillard:'  of -record*  -  9?he-more  fact  that 


the  patentee  pivots  holts  a5  to  the  hands  P,  0,  and  secures  theBe 
holts  to  the  axle.^/does  not  interfere  with  the  function  of  the 
ruhher  blockB  a.  It  is  not  Been  how  applicant  oan  insist  on  such 
a  distinction  v/hon  his  own  device  shows  a  metallic  oontaot  between 


the  side  of  t£e  tpde/and  bipole  27, 

eiaims  3f  h'e  and  B'  are  rejected  on  Hillard,  in  view  of 
trenoh  patent  to  Gautior.  ®ho  latter  patent  shows  rubber  cushions 
between  the  motor  frame  and  the  min  frame,  while  Hillard  shows 
the  cushions  between  the  axles  and  main  frame.  It  is  not  seen 
that  any  invention  is  involved  in  mounting  a  motor  on  the 
Hillard  frame  with  cushions  between  the  motor  and  frame  in  view 
of  Gautier.  , 

Claims  4,  5,  and  6  are  not  considered  patentable  over  pearson 
of  record.  It  is  not  believed  that  there  is  invention  in  connect¬ 
ing-rods  P  Jre  the  rear  axle  instead  of  to  the  frame  0  near  the 


#685,642- 


axle.  The  frame  0  ia  braced  by  roda  0®,  and  it  ia  not 
thought  tho  funotion  of  the  devioe  would  not  be  materially 
different  whether  the  braoes  P  are  attaohed  direotly  to  the 
axle  or  to  the  frame  in  proximity  to  the  axle.  The  frame  C  is 
pivoted  to  one  of  the  axlea  aa  oalled  for  in  olainm  5  and  6. 


Exr.  Div.  X. 


XXI  SHE  TOUTED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 


THOMAS  A.  EDISON,  ) 

HOTOE  VEHICLES,  5  „  _  0(IC 

Room  Ho.  235 

Pilod  March  22,  1912,  ) 

I  Serial  Ho*  686,542-  ) 

HONORABLE  COMMISSIONER  OP  PATENTS, 

SIR: 

In  roeponoo  to  the  Office  action  of  July 
Xy^  1913,  please  amend  the  above  entitled  ouse  as  follows: 

Claim  4, line  2,  cancel  "BpringB"  and 
Insert  -/a  body  lino  4,  cancel  "vehicle"  and  insert 


I  Claim  5,  line  2,  canool  "springs  and 

line  3,  cancel  "pivotally",  line  4,  after  "sale"  first _ 

ocourronoo  insert  -jso  as  to  permit  relative  tilting  move- 

mont  of  the  latter  and  said  frame  -♦ _ _ _ _ 

Claim  6,  lino  2,  cancel  "springs  and",  line 
4,  after  "axle"  first  occurrence,  insert  -j"so  as  to  permit 

relative  tilting  movement  of  the  latter  and  said  frame  -- _ 

\,  Cancel  claims  1,  2,  3,  7,  and  8. 

Ronumber  claims  4,  5,  6,  9  and  10  as  1, 

2,  3,  4  and  6  respectively.  j 


Add  the  following  claims: 


_  6-  In  a  vehicle,  the  combination  of  front  and  roar 

axles,  a  body  mounted  thereon,  a  frame  secured  to  the  roar 
axle  and  having  a  connection  v:ith  the  front  axle  permitting  . 
movement  of  the  latter  with  rospoot  to  said  frame  about  an 
J  axis  substantially  at  right  angles  to  the  said  front  axle, 
and  a  tension  rod  directly  connecting  the  rear  axle  with  the 
1 forward  part  of  tho  body,  substantially  as  described. 

7.  In  a  vehiolo,  tho  combination  of  front  and  rear 
I  axles,  a  body  mounted  thereon,  a  frame  Beourod  to  tho  rear 
I  axle  ’and  having  a  connection  with  tho  front  axle  permitting 


movement  of  the  latter  with  reepeot  to  sail  frame  about 
a  horizontal  axis  substantially  at  right  angles  to  the  said 
front  axle,  and  tension  rods  dlreotly  connected  to  the 
rear  axle  with  the  forward  part  of  the  body,  substantially 
as  described. 


REMARKS 

It  is  submitted  that  olaJm  1  (former  claim  4) 
olearly  and  patantably  distinguishes  from  Pearson  of 
reoord.  Pearson,  in  lines  82  to  88,  page  1  of  his 
patent  stateB  that  the  front  of  the  oarriage  body  is  con¬ 
nected  indireotlv  to  the  rear  axle  B  by  means  of  rods  P, 
the  rear  ehds  of  the  latter  being  connected  to  the  axle- 
frame  rodB  0,C  (and  by  them  to  the  rear  axle).  The  con¬ 
struction  set  forth  in  this  olaim  is  especially  adapted 
for  a  vehiole  wherein  the  front  axle  may  tilt  freely  with 
respeot  to  the  axle-coupling  frame  about  a  horizontal 
axis  without  distorting  such  frame  and^ without  imposing 
stress  thereon,  while  at  the  same  time  the  vehiole  structure 
is  stiffened  and  strengthened  against  shookB  due  to  in¬ 
equalities  in  the  roadway  and  to  starting  and  stopping  of 
the  vehiole  by  means,  such  as  the  tension  rods  described  in 
the  olaim.  The  construction  disolosed  in  Pearson  is  ob¬ 
viously  not  adapted  for  a  vehiole  of  this  typo  for  in  case 
of  the  tilting  of  the  front  axle  of  PearBon'B  device  Btrains 
would  be  imposed  on  the  axle-ooupling  frame  0  through  the 
truss  rods  P  and  the  frame  C,  would  oppose  Buoh  tilting 
movement.  Moreover,  the  oonstruotion  called  for  in  the 
olaim  has  the  further  advent  ago  over  Pearson  of  dividing  ... 
more  or  less  of  the  strains  to  which  the  vehiole  struoture 
is  subjeoted  between  the  vehiole  body  and  the  rear  axle 
and  relieving  such  strains  from  the  axle-ooupling  frame  as 


was  olearly  brought  out  in  the  remarks  on  page  4  of  the 
amendment  of  May  10,  1913. 

While  it  is  believed  that  claims  2  and  3  (former 
claims  5  and  6)  olearly  distinguish  from  Pearson  as 
presented  in  the  last  amendment,  theBe  claims  as  amended 
still  further  differentiate  from  this  reference  by  specify¬ 
ing  that  the  frame  is  secured  or  pivotally  sooured  to  the 
front  axle  so  as  to  permit  relative  tilting  movement  of  the 
latter  and  said  frame.  Ibis  feature  is  not  diBolosed  in 
Pearson. 

Hew  claims  6  end  7  presented  herewith  are  drawn 
along  the  lineB  of  allowed  olaimo  4  and  6  respect  ively. 

Ehese  olaims  clearly  differentiate  from  Pearson  for  reasons 
similar  to  those  sot  forth  on  pages  4  aid  5  of  the  amendment 
of  May  10,  1913  in  connection  with  olaimo  4  and  5  (former 
olaims  9  and  10 ) ,  end  are  thought  necessary  in  order  to 
adequately  protect  applicant  in  his  invention* 

Por  the  reasons  above  set  forth  further  consider¬ 
ation  and  allowance  of  the  olaims  are  respeotfully  requested, 
Respectfully  submitted, 

IHOMAS  A.  EBISOH, 

By_ 

Orange,  Hew  Jersey,  his  Attorney. 

July  /•€  1914. 


WAH-KOK 


<B) 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 
UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 

WASHINGTON  . JbigU&t..27.,...1914.... 

u,  S.  ?M!M!  0’7!' 


■ation  from  the  EXAMINER  in  charge  of  the  application  of 

Thomas  A.  lUdinon,  . 


Please  fin  A  below  a 


Commmiontr  of  Patents.  U 


Amended  July  16,  1914. 

The  statement  of  Invention  is  net  commensurate  with 


the  claims  now  in  the  oase. 

Claim  1,  (former  4)  is  not  patentable  ever  Pearson  of 
record.  The  braoes  ?  perform  substantially  the  same  function 
aa  applicant* s  braces,  and  the  fact  that  they  are  connected 
to  frame  C  a  sliort  distance  from  the  axle  would  net.  interfere 
with  the  rooking  action  of  the  frame.  It  rill  aloe  be  noted 
that  in  Uillard  of  record  the  fruioe  0  i3  rigidly  secured  to 


the  rear  axle  and  pivotally  scoured  to  the  front  axle,  and  the 
braces  R  oorreepond  to  applicant*  a  braoap  .75  and  have  the 
ceme  function.  Patent.  t.o^faBon,  375.B26 ,  Jan.  3,  1888,  01.  21- 
106,  and  also  Marks,  158,956,  Jan.  19,  1875,  same  class,  show 
that  it  is  old  to  extend  a  bracket  from. the  rear  axle  to 
the  body  above  the  front  axle  or  spring.  Tt  In  believed 
that  all  the  olains  are  substantially  anticipated  by 
Uillard  especially  in  view  of  Mason  and  Marks,  cited. 


Exr.  Dlv.  X. 


[PHOTOCOPY] 


[PHOTOCOPY] 


.  ru*-  *-+■. 

lit 


H.\  ©sslk-vnrr* 


[PHOTOCOPY] 


)M/i. . 


Patent  Series 
Patent  Application  Files 


Folio#  833 

Serial  #: 


Recording  and  Reproducing  Combined  Aural  and  Optical 
Impressions 

687967 


Primary  Applicant:  Higham,  Daniel 
Date  Executed:  4/1/1912 


Applicant. 


Address. 


J.'  j  (och^  ..  r?  }  ^  S<1£. 


J  C-tnviJn^^A^  CU^^ecXj^i 

Filed  : 


JuaaJ 


Examiner’s  Room  No. 


itent  No.  ^^^^ssGTd . 


|  ^fljaA^Cs'Ccd^  ^<-  C.  ^  K> 

•2  . 3f.?./.‘Q...  it. 

^JJsa^a6^2jcL. . d2fi*£..£%r/$6 3  is 

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c o 

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1  v*£Jv-  **  'W*S-J'*'~'-'~  20 . 

^  27 _ _ 


FJRAN  K_L. — BYER ,  1  ^ 


petition 


®o  tlje  Commissioner  of  patents: 

gour  petitioner  dahiet,  iiiohah, 

a  citijen  of  tlje  Uniteb  States,  residing  anb  ijabing  a  $oSt  Office  abbress  at 

#43  East  27th  Street,  How  York,  County  of  How  York  unci  State  of 
How  York 

praps  tfjat  letters  patent  map  be  granteb  to  Ijim  for  tlje  implements  in 

t, 1_J~.  &aaa**JL 

_  HggflOPS  OF c  SYilC ;glOIk')U  JfrY  RECOItDIIIC  AH  13  ItEMtOHSC  IHG  ^OPTICAL  • 


Set  fortlj  in  tfje  annexeb  specification ;  anb  be  fjerebp  appoints  Jfranft  TL.  ©per 
(Registration  Mo.  560),  of  Orange,  i5eto  ferSep,  ijis  attornep,  toitfj  full 
potocr  of  substitution  anb  rebocation,  to  prosecute  tljis  application,  to  ntafee 
alterations  anb  amenbments  therein,  to  receibe  tlje  patent,  anb  to  transact  all 
business  in  tlje  patent  Office  connected  tfjerebjitf). 


SPECIFICATION. 


TO  ALL  WHOM  IT  'JAY  CONCERN : 

BE  IT  KNOWN,  that  I,  DANIEL  HIGH  AM,  a  citizen 
of  tho  United  States  ana  a  resident  of  Hev;  York,  in 
the  County  of  Hew  York  and  State  of  Hew  York  hove  made 

certain  nev;  und  useful  improvements  in  KBSSG-DU  OF  BYH- 

■cT«™  -it  rtc<.x.<,.£  “z 3 A> 

OnnOIlOUSiiY  recording  aiid  bepeoduciug  optical  impressions 

AND  "SOUNDS  .‘.SSOGIATED  TIIEEE.VI'&H',  of  which  tho  following  iB 
a  description: 

My  invention  relates  to  methods  of  synchronously 
recording  and  reproducing  optical  impressions  and  sounds 
associated  therewith,  and  is  particularly  applicable  to 
tho  so-called  "talking  pictures",  in  which  a  series  of 
moving  picturos  are  exhibited  upon  a  screen  or  otherwise, 
this  visual  rocord  being  accompanied  by  the  record  of  tho 
sounds  appropriate  thereto,  delivered  in  oxact  synchronism, 
each  sound  with  the  picture  or  pictures  to  which  it  be¬ 
longs  . 

In  making  sound  records  for  "talking  picturos", 
the  location  of  the  source  of  sound  close  to  tho  horn  or 
receiver  of  the  recording  instrument,  as  is  common  in 
making  ordinary  sound  records,  is  usually  impracticable, 
portly  because  in  most  of  the  views  to  bo  depicted,  tho 
Bounds  emanate  from  various  more  or  less  separated  points 
and  also  because  it  is  ordinarily  desirablo  to  exclude 
the  phonograph  from  the  scene  exhibited  by  the  picturos. 
Furthermore,  when  the  source  of  sound  is  located  in  close 
proximity  to  the  horn  of  tho  recording  instrument,  there 
are  certain  disturbing  influences  which  affect  the  re¬ 
cording  operations,  by  reason  of  which  influences  tho 
1 


I  quality  of  the  recorded  sounds  iG  so  affected  as  not  to  he 
jj  truly  representative  of  the  original  sounds.  One  of 
J  those  influences  is  due  to  the  fact  that  the  amplitude  of 
|  the  recorded  vibrations  is  so  large  that  the  resistance 
|  to  the  entrance  of  the  cutting  edge  of  the  recording  stylus 
|  into  the  material  of  the  record  blank  increases  very  rapidly 
ii  from  the  beginning  to  the  end  of  tho  cut;  or,  in  other 
ji  words,  the  energy  required  to  force  the  cutting  edge  into 
I  the  material  for  the  first  nuarter,  for  example,  of  the 
li  cut  is  very  much  leas  than  that  required  to  force  tho 
I  cutting  edge  into  the  material  for  the  final  quarter  of 
l  tho  cut.  Consequently,  sounds  which  are  relatively  weak, 

1  are  more  perfectly  recorded  than  very  loud  sounds,  because 
;  with  the  former,  the  amplitude  of  vibration  of  tin  recording 
!  stylus  will  more  neai'ly  coincido  with  that  of  the  sound 
;;  waves.  Another  of  these  disturbing  influences  is.  duo  to 
jj  the  inertia  and  momentum  of  the  diaphragm  and  recording 
j|  devices  carried  by  or  connected  7/ith  the  same.  As  a 
I  result,  when  the  diaphragm  is  subjected  to  vibration  of 
|  considerable  amplitude,  the  momentum  of  tho  parts  eausios 
•I  the  recording  stylus  to  subsequently  out  to  a  disproportion- 

il  ......  .  _ 


atoly  great -For' those;  reasons,  I  find  that  the 
j|  ouality  of  the  recorded  sounds  is  in  inverse  ratio  to  the 
that  when  the  attempt  is  mode  to 
a,  record  of  groat  amplitude,  the 
louder  notes  are  generally  of  poor  quality,  and  arc  out 
of  proportion  to  the  notes  or  sounds  of  loss  amplitude. 

The  principal  object  of  my  invention  is  to 
provide  a  method  whereby  the  above  named  objections  are 
eliminated.  In  accordance  with  this  object,  I  place  the 
phonograph  or  recording  instrument  at  such  a  distance  from 
the  soureo  of  sound  that  the  sound  record  obtained  is 


I  formed  of  vibrations  of-  small  amplitude),  tlio  phonograph 
or  recording  instrument  being  preferably  without  the 
range  of  the  photographic  camera  employed  for  making  a 
|  record  of  the  optical  impressions.  The  camera  having  been 
S  properly  focused  on  the  source  of  the  optical  impressions , 

|  I  simultaneously  photograph  the  latter  and  record  the 
|  sounds  associated  with  the  same.  The  sound  record  ob- 


||  tained  in  this  way,  although  of  superior  nuality  duo  to 
I  the  small  amplitude  of  the  vibrations  thereon,  is  too  weak 

jj  when  fl'ep^u^’TirTctly^%T^^1^^7p^duein^  ‘^'y 

f  realistic  effects  in  combination  with  the  pieturos  assooiat-j 

'!  A  /%/'f  ! 

|  od  therewith.  I  accordingly  obtain  from  the  master  rooord 

I  thus  made,  an  amplified  copy  thereof,  preferably  by  an 
I  apparatus  by  which  the  record  is  mechanically  transferred 
|  and  amplified.  A  poaitive  having  been  made  from  the 
|  photographic  film  or  other  element  affected  by  tlio  light  in 
I  taking  the  original  photograph,  the  said  pooitivo  and  the 


j!  amplified  duplicate  record  when  synchronously  reproduced 
i!  give  a  faithful,  pleasing,  and  realistic  reproduction  of 
jj  the  original  optical  improcsions  and  the  sounds  associated 
therewith. 


|  In  order  that  my  invention  may  be  better 

j  understood,  attention  is  directed  to  the  accompanying 
|  drawings  forming  a  part  of  this  specification  and  in  which  - 
j!  Pig.  1  is  a  diagrammatic  side  view  showing  the 

preferred  relative  positions  of  a  source  of  optical  im- 
|  press ions  and  sounds,  a  photographic  camera,  and  a  rocord- 
|  ing  instrument ; 

jj  Pig.  2  is  a  view  partly  in  cross  sootion  and 

ij  partly  in  elevation  illustrating  my  proferrod  embodiment 
ji  of  mechanical  amplifying  and  duplicating  apparatus; 

3 


,j|  Figs.  3  and  4  arc  diagrammatic  views  showing 

j  the  relative  positions  of  the  rocoi-ding  stylus  and  the  j 

I  record  for  two  different  depths  of  cut  of  the  stylus,  one 
!|  twice  the  other,  those  views  serving  to  illustrate  the 
j  rapid  inoreauc  of  the  cross  section  of  the  material  to  he 
.  ij  removed  hy  the  stylus  during  the  latter  part  of  the  ciitting 
I,  operation;  and 

j;.  Fig.  5  is  a  diagram  illustrating  graphically 

||  the  area  of  material  removed  hy  the  stylus  for  oach  of 
ji  tho  four  quarters  of  two  cuts,  one  twice  as  doop  as  the 


other. 


| 

J 


Referring  to  Rig.  1,  tho  numeral  1  designates  a 
suitable  source  of  sounds  and  optical  impressions,  such  as 
a  person  dancing  and  singing,  the  numeral  £5  a  photographic 
camora,  and  tho  numeral  3  a  uni table  recording  instrument , 
such  as  a  phonograph  of  common  construction  having  a 
rotatable  support  for  a  record  4  and  a  stylus  movable  trans- 
vorsely  thereof,  as  is  common  in  the  phonographic  art. 

1'he  dotted  lines  in  Pig.  1  define  the  limits  of  the  range 
of  tho  camera  2,  tho  object  1  being  located  within  the 
range  and  field  of  the  camera  and  at  tho  propor  focal  dis¬ 
tance  from  tho  lattor.  Tho  recording  phonograph  is 
located  a  considerable  distance  from  tho  object  1  and  with¬ 
out  tho  range  of  the  camera  £  so  that  it  will  bo  excluded 
from  tho  picture  taken  hy  the  camera.  Tho  performer,  or 
source  of  the  sounds  and  optical  impressions,  and  the 
recording  machines  having  been  arranged  in  proper  rolauivo 
positions,  the  machines  are  started  in  operation  at  the 
proper  time  and  the  combined  optical  and  sound  records 
simultaneously  made. 

The  optical  record  and  tho  master  sound  record 
having  been  thus  made,  I  now  obtain  an  amplified  copy  of 
4 


Ij  the  master  sound  record,  proforably  hy  apparatus  hy  which 
||  the  record  1b  mechanically  transferred  ana  umplifiod. 

II  A  suitable  apparatus  for  the  purposo  iB  indicated  in 

j  Pig.  2,  in  which  master  4  is  carried  on  the  mandrel  5,  and - 

Jj  tho  blank  0.  is  carried  on  tho  mandrel  7..  Those  mandrels 
!|  aro  rotated  simultaneously  by  any  suitublo  gearing  at  a 
jj  low  speed,  so  that  the  surface  speed  of  tho  raautor  is 
jj  sufficiently  low  to  prevent  any  disturbing  influence  duo 
3  to  momentum  or  inertia  of  the  moving  parts.  In  this 
I  apparatus,  tho  numeral  0  designates  a  support  on  which  a 
|j  member  £  is  pivoted  for  movement  substantially  at  right 
jj  angles  to  the  axes  of  the  mandrels  £  and  7..  This  member 
ij  9  carries  at  ito  forward  end  two  alined  pivots  10  and  11 
ij  Bupporting  a  weight  12  and  permitting  the  latter  to  movo 
||  m  a  direction  suhotantiolly  parallel  to  tho  axes  of  tho 
mandrels  5  and  7.  A  lover  13  is  pivoted  to  tho  weight  12 
j  for  movemont  towards  and  away  from  the  record  4  und  the 
9  blank  6.  The  numeral  14  indicates  a  manually  movable 
jj  lever  by  which  the  weight  i2  may  he  lifted  or  hy  which  it 
may  he  supported  when  thoro  is  no  record  on  tho  mandrel  5, 

|  the  d ownwar d  movomont  of  the  said  lever  14  being  limitod 

l| 

|  by  a  suitable  stop  15.  The  lover  13  darrioB  at  its  lower 
jj  portion  a  stylui7proferahly  of  sapphire  adapted  to  track 
|  the  record  grooves  formed  in  the  master  4,  and  is  formed 
with  an  elongated  portion  17  carrying  at  its  outer  end  a 
recording  or  cutting  stylus  10  adapted  to  operate  upon  the 
blank  (j.  The  styluses  16.  and  10  are  so  arranged  with 
respect  to  the  pivot  of  the  lever  13  as  to  give  tho  dosired 
amplification.  In  practice  I  find  that  with  my  preferred 
arrangement  of  recording  apparatus,  the  maximum  depth  of 
cut  obtained  on  my  master  record  is  about  . 0004" ;  so  that 
by  employing  an  amplification  of  two  to  ono,  I  obtain  on 
tho  duplicate  rocord  a  maximum  depth  of  cut  of  about 
.0000”,  a  very  satisfactory  depth  for  sound  reproduction. 


rves  to 


i  A  tone ion  spring  15.  connected  to  the  lover  13  eci 
I  withdraw  the  stylus  18  from  the  blank  G  when  the  Weight  j 
12  is  lifted  by  the  levor  14-  roaBcm  o1'  *he  Pivo1:al  . 
mounting  of  the  weight  12  hereinbefore  described,  the 
Jj  styluses  are  permitted  to  remain  in  firm  engagement  with 
j  the  master  record  and  blank  regardless  of  any  eooontrioitioL 
I  or  other  irregularities  in  the  same  and  the  stylus  16  is 
j  permitted  to  follow  the  lateral  or  other  irregularities 
;!  m  the  record  groove  in  the  master  4.  It  is  obvious  that 
I;  tho  relative  axial  movomont  between  the  styluses  and  tno 
||  record  und  blank  may  be  obtained  either  by  the  axial  j 

j  movement  of  the  mandrels  D  and  7,  together  w^th Jhe  j 

|  record  and  blank  supported  thereby,  or  by,«SW  the 
|  parts  ft  and  14  en-^rnvoling'carriago  movable  axially  | 

j  of  the  mandrels  6  and  7.  I  prefer,  however,  to  have  tho  | 

j  part  ft  stationary  and  to  secure  the  necessary  feeding  . j 

!  movement  by  an  axial  movomont  of  tho  mandrels  and  the 

record  and  blank  supported  thereby.  Mechanisms  suitable 
for  producing  the  said  feeding  movement  are  well  known 
in  the  phonographic  art. 

In  operating  the  duplicating  apparatus  described 
|  above,  the  weight  12  is  first  lifted  by  means  of  the  levor 
14  to  permit  the  record  4  to  bo  placed  on  the  mandrel  b. 

'  Affer  the  said  record  is  in  position,  tho  weight  12  is 

lowered  sufficiently  to  permit  tho  blank  6  to  bo  placed  in 
position  on  the  mandrel  7,  after  which  the  lever  14  is 
|  released  to  permit  tho  weight  12  to  move  the  styluses  16 
and  18  into  firm  engagement  with  the  record  4  and  the 
blank  6  respectively.  When  now  the  motive  means  for  the 
duplicating  apparatus  is  set  into  operation  to  rotate  the 
mandrels  ft  and  7  and  to  produce  the  proper  feeding  movement 
between  the  styluses  16  and.  18  and  the  master  record  and 

6 


blank,  the  blank  will  bo  provided  with  a  record  therein 
which  will  correspond  with  that  on  the  master,  oxcopt  that 
it  will  be  amplified.  Tho  photographic  film  or  other 
light  affected  clement  containing  a  record  of  the  econo 
photographed  having  boon  developed  and  a  pooitivo  made 
therefrom,  a  faithful  and  realistic  reproduction  of  the 
original  optical  impression  and  the  sounds  associated 


therewith  may.  bo  made  from  the  said  positive  and  the  ampli¬ 
fied  sound  record  by  suitable  synchronising  mechanism,  such 

VwW  '  S' . I 

as  that  disclosed  in  ■ 


I  Figures  ij ,  4  and  0  servo  to  explain  the  causes 

jj  for  the  reduction  of  the  amplitude  of  the  sound  waves  with 
|  tlio  recording  apparatus  arranged  in  accordance  with  my 
jl  invention  and  also  thq  causes  for  the  improved  quality  of 
'  ij  sound  record  resulting  from  uaid  arrangement.  Referring 
1  to  Figures  3  and  4,  the  immoral  20  designates  a  circle 
I  representing  the  contour  of  the  outting  edge  of  the  re- 
|"  cording  stylus,  and  the  numeral  21  designates  in  cross 
|  seotion  the  portion  of  the  record  or  blank  operated  upon. 
Tho  former  of  these  figures  shows  a  dopth  of  cut  ono-hulf 
of  that  shown  in  the  lattor,  this  ratio  of  the  depth  of 
the  cuts  being  tho  same  as  the  preferred  ratio  between  tho 
depths  of  tho  cuts  in  my  mastor  und  amplified  duplicate 
records  respectively.  An  inspection  of  the  areas  between 
the  dotted  lines  and  the  lower  portions  of  the  circles  20 
in  these  figures  will  show  roughly  that  tho  amount  of 
material  to  bo  removed  by  the  recording  stylus,  and  tho 
resistance  to  the  cutting  of  the  said  stylus  increases 
j  rapidly  with  the  depth  of  cut.  This  rapid  increase  is 
||  more  clearly  shown  in  Fig.  5.  In  this  figure,  I  have 

I"  plotted  the  cross  sectional  areas  of  the  material  removed 
by  the  recording  otylua  for  each  quarter  of  each  of  two 


■I 


cute,  one  twice  as  deep  no  the  other.  In  making  the 
I  computations  for  this  figure,  the  maximum  depths  for  the 
two  cuts  were  taken  as  .0004"  and  .0000"  respectively ,  these 
being  approximately  tho  maximum  depths  respectively  for 
!  the  master  record  and  amplified  duplicate  record  preferably 
obtained  by  me  in  practicing  my  invention.  The  diameter 
of  tho  cutting  edge  of  the  recording  stylus  was  taken  as 
ji  .050",  a  diameter  which  is  common  in  practice.  Referring 
!j  to  Figure  5,  tho  line  23,  24,  represents  the  cross  section- 
|  al  area  of  tho  material  removed  during  the  first  quarter 
of  tho  larger  of  the  two  outs  in  question,  or  approximately 
i  the  resistance  of  the  stylus  in  making  the  said  cut;  to 
tho  same  scale,  tho  line  25,  26  represents  the  area  removed 
or  the  resistance  to  the  cutting  during  tho  second  quarter 
of  tho  said  cut,  the  line  27,28,  the  area  and  resistance 
during  the  third  ouarter,  and  the  line  29,30,  tho  area  and 
resistance  during  the  fourth  quarter.  The  rate  of  in¬ 
crease  of  resistance  to  the  cutting  effect  of  the  stylus 
is  graphically  represented  by  the  curved  line  22,23,25,27, 

29.  From  this  diagram,  it  will  be  evident  that  as  tho 
stylus  cuts  into  the  material,  the  resistance  oncountcred 
thereby  increases  very  rapidly  and  becomes  very  pronounced 
as  the  stylus  reaches  tho  maximum  depth,  the  distortion 
;j  of  the  sound  waves  therefore  increasing  rapidly  with  their 
;|  increase  in  amplitude.  It  is  also  evident  from  this 

diagram  that  if  the  intensity  of  the  sound  waves  be  diminish- 
i  od,  tho  amplitude  of  tho  record  vibrations  will  likewise 
diminish;  so  that,  if  the  recording  instrument  be  located 
a  considerable  distance  from  the  source  of  sound  and 
optical  impressions,  as  in  my  invention,  the  intensity  of 
tho  sound  waves  will  not  be  sufficient  to  record  vibrations 
of  the  same  amplitude  as  would  be  produced  if  the  source 
of. sound  wore  located  close  to  the  recording  instrument , 

8 


the  location  employed  in  ordinary  sound  recording.  The 
curve  22,  31,  32,  33,  34  .which  is  plotted  to  the  same 
scale  and  in  the  same  manner  as  the  curve  22,  23,  20,  27, 

29  represents  a  maximum  cut  of  tho  lesser  of  the  two  depths 
referred  to  above.  Prom  a  comparison  of  the  two  curves 
plotted  in  I'igure  0,  it  will  bo  again  seen  not  only  that 
■  the  amount  of  material  to  be  removed  is  much  les3  for  the 
|  shallower  cut  than  for  tho  deeper  cut,  but  also  that  tho 
ij  resistance  to  the  cutting  of  tho  stylus  as  tho  latter  enters 
ji  the  record  material  is  moro  nearly  uniform  for  the  former 
ij  than  for  the  latter  cut.  It  is  accordingly  evident  that  • 
jj  although  tho  sound  record  obtained  when  tho  sound  recording 
1  instrument  is  located  a  considerable  distance  from  tho 
jl  soux’ce  of  sounds,  as  is  done  in  accordance  with  my  inven- 
'!  tion.  Id  weaker  than  that  obtained  when  the  recording  in- 

:i  Btrument  is  in  close  proximity  to  tho  source  of  sound, 

li 

!|  the  record  obtained  is  of  improved  ouallty;  so  that ,  when 
|j  the  said  record  is  amplified  as  described  above,  a  sound 
!j  record  of  desired  intensity  and  exceeding  purity  and 

I 

j|  faithfulness  is  obtained.  My  invention,  therefore, 

I  ,  presents  a  practical  method  of  excluding  the  phonograph 
j|  or  other  recording  instrument  from  the  field  of  tho  camera 
ij  and  at  the  same  time  obtaining  a  faithful  reproduction  of 
jl  excellent  onallty^  ^ 

While  theA^du|vid‘^nt r  forraed-from- the '  blank  <3  might 
be  used  directly  in  tho  reproduction  of  the  original 
sound  record,  I  prefer  to  make  duplicates  thereof  by  any 
of  tho  wellknown  processes  known  in  the  phonographic  art. 

It  is  obvious  that  many  other  changes  may  be  made  in  the 
•  exact  particulars  of  the  method  descrihod  without  departing 
from  the  spirit  of  my  invention. 

What  I  claim  ua  new  and  dosire  to  protect  by 

/ 


Letters  Patent  of  the  United  states  is  as  follows; 

1.  method  of  synchronously  recording  optical 

impresoions  sounds  associated  therewith  which  consists 

in  photographing  the  source  of  the  optical>prossions  and 
in  simultaneously  recording  the  soamds  associated  with 
said  impression  a  phonograph  .looatexa  at  a  relatively 

>i  the  source  of  said  sounds,  in  obtaining 


great  distanqo  fror^ 
from  the  phonograph  \ 
increased  amplitude 


cord  a  -duplicate  sound  record  of 

git ili sing  tho  light-affected 

Lnf,v/°BltiVe’  Wher0l)y  Saia 

3o(md/Jreoord.  are  adapted  when 
accurately  reproduce  the 
and  the  sounds  associated 
Bet 

2.  The  method  of  synchronously  recording  optical 
impressions  and  sounds  associa\ed  therewith  which  consists 
in  photographing  the  source  of  ke  optical  impressions  and 
in  simultaneously  recording  the  Vnds  associated  with 
said  impressions  on  &-phon  o at  a  relatively 
great  distance  from,  the  source  of  skd  sounds,  in  obtaining 
//omlhf^ptoW^’reeord  by  amplifying  mechanical  trans- 
foroneo  a  duplto^  sound  record  of  i^reased  amplitud 


for  making  a  positive,  whereby  said  pos: 

oun d^re cord  aro  adapted  when  s 


and  in  utilising  the  light-affeoted  pho\oEra,hio  element 

and  said 
lehronously 

reproduced,  to  faithfully  reproduce  the  origWl  optical 
impressions  and  the  sounds  associated  therewith,  substantiaj.. 
ly  as  set  forth. 

;s.  The  method  of  synchronously  recording  optical 
impressions  and  sounds  associated  therewith  which  consists  ' 
in  photographing  the  source  of  the  optical  impressions  and  | 


10 


!j  in  simultaneously  recording  the  sounds  associated  with  said 

!;  •  9P-3//B 

I  improsalona  'en  n  phonograph  located  without  the  range. of 

||  tho  photographic  camera/ iln 'obtaining  from  the" phonograph  _ 
■0-3/3  A  A 

ii  record  a  duplicate  sound  record  of  increased  amplitude, 

ii  and  in  utilizing  the  light-affccted  photographic  element 
|  for  making  a  positive,  whereby  said  positive  and  said 
duplloat-e  sound  record  are  adapted  when  synchronously 
reproduced  to  faithfully  reproduce  the  original  optical 
|  impressions  and  the  sounds  associated  therewith,  substan¬ 
tially  as  sot  forth. 

ij  4.  The  method  of  synchronously  rocording  optical 

l| 

|  impressions  and  sounds  associated  therewith  which  consists 
|j  in  photographing  the  source  of  the  optical  impressions  and 

||  in  simultaneously  recording  the  sounds  associated  with 
i!  /A  3/ =5 

II  said  iiufTOnaimn  on  Innntw!  Without  tllO  TUngC 

1  ut . ,  .  .  .  ,  ***.+.*  «  'A, 

Ij  of  tho  photofjraphic  camera/ in  obtair.ing  Trom  the  phono- 

ij  graph  record  by  amplifying  mechanical  transference  a 
duplicate-  sound  rocoi'd  of  increased  amplitude,  and  in 
utilizing  the  light-affected  photographic  element  for 
i  making  a  positive,  whereby  said  positive  and  said  flupll.. 

* ■'/ 

euie-  sound  record  arc  adapted  when  synchronously  repro¬ 
duced  to  faithfully  reproduce  the  original  optical  im¬ 
pressions  and  tho  sounds  associated  therewith,  substantial- 
I  ly  ns  sot  forth. 

5.  The  method  of  synchronously  reproducing  optical 
impressions  and  sounds  associated  therewith  which  consists 
in  photographing  the  source  of  the  ‘optical  impressions  and 
in  simultaneously  recording  the  pounds  associated  with 
said  impressions  [on-  e  phonograph  located)  ut  a  relatively 
groat  distance- from  the  source  of  said  sounds,  in-obtain- 
ing  from  the -phonograph  record  a  dupfierto  record  of  in¬ 
creased  amplitude,  in  utilizing  the  1 ight -affected  photo- 


11 


graphic  element  for jsakixtg  a  positive,  and  finally  in  i 

aynchronoualy^reproducing  aoid  positive  and  said  d«^4eate- 
record,- substantially  as  set  forth. 

6.  The  method  of  synchronously  reproducing  optical 
impressions  and  sounds  associated  therewith  which  consists 
in  photographing  the  source  of  -the  optical  impressions  and 
in  simultaneously  recording  the  sounds  associated  with 
!  said  impressions  /on  a . phonograph -1-ooalred  at  a  relatively 
jj  groat  distance  from  the  source  of  said  sounds,  in  obtaining 
ij  from  the  phonograph  record  by  amplifying  mechanical  trans- 


— a  / 
i  duplicate-  record  of  increased  amplitude 


in 


ferenc 

utilising  the  light-affected  photographic  element  for 
making  a’positl 


,  and  finally  in  synchronously  reproducing 

tX-nc-A  *'/*-*// 3 

said  positive  and  said  duplicate  record ,  substantially  as 


The  method  of  synchronously  reproducing  optical 
impressions  nnd  sounds  associated  therewith  which  consists 
in  photographing  the  source  of  the  optical  impressions  and 
in  simultaneously  recording  the  sounds  associated  with  said 
improsaionB  on- a  phonograph  -lecatcd’  without  the  range  of  ^ 
the  photographic  curaerl^  "^obtaining  from  thejffonograpto. 

record  a  duulioo-te  record  of  increased  amplitude,  in 
A 

utilising  the  light-affected  photographic  element  for 
making  a  posit: 


,  and  finally  in  synohronously  reproducing 

7A  i//a 

said  positive  and  said  duplicate-  record ,  substantially  sb 
set  forth. 

Jj,.  The  method  of  synchronously  reproducing  optical 
impressions  and  soundB  associated  therewith  which  consists 
in  photographing  the  source  of  the  optical  impressions  and 
in  simultaneously  recording  tho  sounds  associated  vnth 
said  impressions  (on  n  phnT'ngrpph-lncatud-without  the  range 


■;uL  etf  ^-.ac-C^l-v-eXy  fluent  ootu,e£.  -a/  ^U.  a^.^Cs. 

of  the  photographic  asmore,  in  obtaining  from  the  phene- 
•grttpir/record'  by  amplifying  mechanical  transference  a 

*'‘r  ^  1‘  ACrj-Lr*^.  ?'•*  *//3 

-duplicate  record  of  increased  amplitude,  in  utilizing  the 
light-uffected  photographic  element  for  making  a  positive , 
•and  finally  in  oynchronously  reproducing  said  positive  and 
said  -dup'l-j.otite  record ,  substantially  as  sot  forth. 


tEijfe  specification  signet)  anb  toitneSSeb  this  bap  of  191  ^ 

MlitneSSetlj:  " 

...  ..^il^eSiH/Cuubu 

2. 


©atb. 


g>tate  of  J2etu  fersep 
Coutitp  of  €sscx  j 

daiiiel  Hiciut:  ,  tije  abobe  tiaineb 
petitioner,  being  buljj  Sbiorn,  beposes  anb  saps  t1jnt  ije  is  a  citijen  of  tije  ISIniteb 
states,  anb  a  resibent  Of  Uov/  Yorl: ,  County  of  Hen  York  iincl  Stake  of 
II ev/  York, 


tijat  Ije  berilg  beliebes  biinseif  to  be  tlje  original,  first  anb  Sole  inbentor  of  tije 
improbements  in  methods  op  oyiichroiiouuly  hkoordiiig  aiid  bkkioduciiig 
OPTICAL  II.5DRESSIOII8  A1ID  SOUIIDS  jOjoOCIaiLj.  aIILREWITH  , 


beScribeb  anb  tlainteb  in  tfjc  annexeb  specification  ;  tljat  be  boes  not  knob)  anb 
boes  not  beliebe  tljat  tije  Same  teas  ebcr  fenobm  or  useb  before  bis  Mention  or 
biscoberp  thereof ;  or  patenteb  or  beScribeb  in  nnp  printeb  publication  in  tfjc 
IHniteb  states  of  America  or  anp  foreign  countrp  before  bis  inbention  or 
biscoberp  thereof,  or  more  than  tbjo  pears  prior  to  this  application;  or  patenteb 
in  anp  countrp  foreign  to  tije  Uniteb  states  on  an  application  Web  more  than 
ttuelbe  months  prior  to  this  application;  or  in  public  use  or  on  sale  in  tije 
IHniteb  states  for  more  than  ttoo  pears  prior  to  this  application;  anb  tljat  no 
application  for  patent  upon  saib  inbention  has  been  fileb  bp  him  or  bis  legal 
rcpreSentatibeS  or  assigns  in  anp 

g>toorn  to  anb  subscribeb 

[Iseal] 


i^otarp  public. 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 
UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 


Daniel  lligham, 
c/o  Prank  I>.  Byor, 
Orange , 

How  Jersey. 

Please  find  below  a  communication 


Uethods  of  SynohronouBly  Recording  and  Rrproduoing  Optical  Im- 
praBoions  oto.,  i'ilod  April, 2, 

8eri»|£_Jf<587,967. 


Tha  title  in  thin  onno  1b  unduly  long  and  should  be  ab¬ 
breviated. 

Page  0,  linos  13  -  IB,  the  reference  to  a  modified  form, 
in  which  tho  parts  8  and  14  are  mounted  on  a  oarriage,  should 
be  illustrated  on  the  drawing  or  eraood.  Applionnt  wil.l  be 
allowed  only  to  Bhow  thin  carriage  in  a  oonvsntional  way,  if 
he  oan  point  out  ouoh  an  old  structure:  and  if  ho  cannot  do 
thiB,  he  will  not  bo  nllowod  to  retain  this  modification  in 
the  present  oaso,  as  the  proBont  description  is  not  specif io 
enough  to  support  a  spooifio  struoturo  of  traveling  carriage. 

Tho  o la 1ms  are  rejected  on  o^therof  the  patents  to 

Croenbaum,  (British),  #7,426,  of  1909; 

(88—16,  Syn.);  „/ 

Barker,  (British),  #8,838,  of  1909; 

(88—16  Syn.);  . 

in  view  of  y 

Edison,  #970,616,  Bop.  20,  1910; 

Wuloutt ,  #733,‘o81,  July  14,  1903; 

(181—16). 

Qyeenbaum  and  parkor  eaoh  show  a  combination  of  maohineB  for  Bimul- 
tanooualy  recording  pictures  and  ooundB,  and  thiB  same  combination 
is  adapted  to  be  used  to  reproduce  these  pictures  and  sounds.  It 
is  observed  that  tho  maohinos  in  those  patents  are  loo  ated  in 
close  proximity  to  each  other,  and  consequently  the  sound 


#687,967- 


records  aro  more  or  Ians  foable,  the  same  an  In  applicant, b  de- 
vtoe.  Than  all  that  applicant  tloea  in  hio  method  of  prooodure 
that  ia  not  followed  out  in  tho  patented  devices,  in  to  amplify 
the  more  or  lass  weak  iiound'  record  before  reproducing  tho  same, 
(phis  is  not  thought  to  involve  any  degree  of  inventive  skill  in 

view  of  the  expedient  shown  by  lid i non  and  Waloutt,  oitod.  Thus 

the  "method"  olaimB  treated  ao  auoh  are  Been  to  preBent  nothing 
patentable  over  the  above  art. 

yhe  olaiina  are  also  rejeoted  as  being  drawn  to  an  impropor 
method,  since  they  merely  reoito  the  obvious  stops  in  the  oper¬ 
ation  of  tho  devices  above  cited,  an  pointed  out  in  tho  pre¬ 
ceding  paragraph. 

Then  considering  tho  oubntnnoo  of  tho  olaims,  and  disre¬ 
garding  tho  "method"  form  in  whioh  they  aro  now  drawn,  they  are 
thought  to  oovor  on  aggregation,  and  aro  accordingly  rejected. 
That  io  to  city ,  whatovor  invention  there  ia  in  the  present  oaso 

is  soon  to  rooido  in  tho  upeoifio  amplifying  moano  pgr  .go,  and 

not  in  ito  inclusion  in  the  old  combination  of  pioture  and 
sound  machines.  In  fact,  no  oo-aotion  whatever  is  seen  to 
exiBt  between  the  amplifying  means  and  the  combination  above 
referred  to.  TOuitovor  improvement  is  to  be  derived  from  tho 
amplifying  of  the  Bound  reoord  1b  hold  to  relate  to  the  pound 
machine  alone,  and  ohould  therefore  be  claimed  in  Buch  manner. 

The  combination  of  pioture  and  oound  machines  1b  shown  to  be 


old  by  the  above  patents}  nnd  oinoe  applicant  obtains  no  new 
result  by  using  an  amplified  reoord  instead  of  the  more  or  less 
feeble  one,  hio  invention  does  not  lie  in  tho  substitution  of 
the  amplified  reoord  in  thin  old  combination  but  in  this  record 
.^lament  alone  or  tho  dovioo  for  produoing  the  pome.  See  In  Be 

to$dv<siz  zoo  o,  a,  217a,  _ 

Examiner. 


/ 


IN  TEE  UI1I TED  STATED  PATENT  OFFICE. 


I  DANIEL  HIGHAM, 

METHODS  OF  SYNCHRONOUSLY 
RECORDING  AND  REPRODUCING 
OPTICAL  IMPRESSIONS  AND 
SOUNDS  ASSOCIATE?  THEREWITH. 

|  Files  April  2,  1912, 

Sorial  No.  687 ,967 • 


)  Room  No.  312. 


) 


|  HONORABLE  COMMISSIONER  OF  PATENTS, 

S  I  R: 

In  response  to  the  Office  action  of 
i  October  8.,  1912,  pleaee  amend  the  above  entitled  case  as 
I  follows: 

In  the  preamble  of  the  specification , 

|  change  the  title  of  the  invention  to  read  as  follows: 

.  RECORDING  AND  REPRODUCING  COMBINED  AURAL  AND  OPTICAL 
|  IMPRESSIONS  -  . 

In  line  13,  page  6,  change  "mounting"  to 
|  -  moving  -  ;  and  in  lino  14,  sane  page,  cancel  "on  a 
I  traveling  oarria^  movable"  . 

In  line  5,  claim  1,  oancel  "on  a  phonograph 

I  located";  in  line  7,  same  claim,  change  "phonograph"  to 
-  resulting  sound  -,  and  cancel  "duplicate";  and  in  lino 
10,  same  claim,  change  "duplicate"  to  -  amplified  -. 

In  line  5,  claim  2,  cancel  "on  a  phonograph 
j located";  inline  7,  same  claim,  change  "phonograph"  to 
_  resulting  sound  -  ;  in  line  8,  same  claim,  cancel 
J "duplicate";  and  in  line  11,  same  claim,  change  "duplicate 
-  amplified  -  • 

In  line  5,  claim  3,  cancel  "on  a  phonograph 

I  located”;  in  lino  6,  same  claim,  change  "phonograph" 
to  -  resulting  sound  -  ;  in  line  7,  same  claim,  oanoel 


"duplicate" ;  and  in  lino  10,  same  claim,  change  "duplicate' 
to  -  amplified 

In  line  5,  claim  4,  cancel  "on  a  phonograph 
located";  in  linoa  6  and  7,  same  claim,  change  "phonograph' 
to  -  resulting  sound  -  ;  in  line  8,  same  claim,  cancel 
"duplicate";  and  in  lines  10  and  11,  same  claim,  ohange 
"duplicate"  to  -  amplified  -  . 

In  line  5,  claim  5,  oancel  "on  a  phonograph 
located";  in  line  7,  same  claim,  change  "phonograph"  to 

-  resulting  sound  -,  and  "duplicate"  to  -  sound  -  ;  and 
■in  line  10,  same  claim,  ohango  "duplicate"  to  -amplified  -* 

,  In  line  5,  olaim  6,  cancel  "on  a  phonograph 
located";  in  lino  7,  same  olaim,  ohange  "phonograph"  to 

-  resulting  sound  -  ;  in  line  8,  same  olaim,  ohange 
"duplicate"  to  -  sound  -;  and  in  line  11,  same  claim, 
ohange  "duplioato"  to  -  amplified  -  . 

In  line  5,  olaim  7,  oancel  "on  a  phonograph 
looated" ;  in  line  6,  same  claim,  ohango  "phonograph" 
to  -  resulting  sound  -  ;  in  line  7,  same  olaim,  ohange 
"duplicate"  to  -sound-;  and  in  line  10,  same  olaim,  change 
"duplicate"  to  -  amplified--; 

In  line  5,  claim  8,  oancel  "on  a  phonograph 
located";  in  lines  6  and  7 ,  same  claims,  change  "phonograph" 
to  -  resulting  sound  -  ;  in  line  8,  same  claim,  change 
"duplicate"  to  -  sound  -  ;  and  in  line  11,  same  claim, 
ohange  "duplicate"  to  -  amplified  -  . 

REMARKS 

The  specification  as  now  presented  is  thought 
to  he  free  from  the  objections  raised  by  the  :Examiner  in  the 
first  and  second  paragraphs  of  the  last  Office  action. 

2 


She  claims  in  this  oase  are  thought  to  he  j 

drawn  to  a  proper  method,  the  more  fact  that  the  method  is 
■best  carried  on  hy  means  of  apparatus  suoh  as  that  disclosec 
being  immaterial.  It  is  well  settled  that  a  process  or 

j  method  though  of  a  mechanical  nature  and  best  illustrated . 

|  by  mechanism  may.  if  new  and  useful,  be  the  proper  subject 
of  a  patent.  Weston,  94  O.G.  1786;  1901  C.D.  290. 

John  R.  Williams  Co.  et  al-  v.  Hiller,  et  al  Kfg.  Co. 

107  F.  290  (H.T.);  97  O.G.  2308;  1901  C.D.  517. 

In  Lawthor  vs.  Hamilton,  124  U.S.,  1,  6,  the  | 

{j  patent  related  to  the  extraction  of  oil  from  oleagenous 

seeds.  notwithstanding  the  fact  that  the  invention  claimei 
j  was  performed  by  the  aid  of  machinery,  the  Supreme  Court 
I  held  that  the  same  constituted  a  patentable  process- 

Iln  view  of  the  foregoing,  it  is  thought  that 
applicant's  olaims  are  properly  drawn  to  cover  a  method. 
This  being  the  case,  the  last  two  paragraphs  of  the  last 
Office  action  have  no  bearing  on  the  invention  as  claimed. 

In  regard  to  the  rejection  of  the  claims,  one 
of  the  steps  of  applicant's  method  to-wit:  obtaining^ 
j  gpund  record  of  incre^  amplitude,  is  not  disclosed  in 
the  patents  to  Greenbaum  and  Barter.  Citing  other  patents 
!  which  may  employ  the  omitted  step,  does  not  cure  the 
j  defect,  for  the  simple  reason  that  the  absence  of  one  step 
essential  to  applicant's  process  or  method  cannot  exist 
S  and  the  method  remain-  Any  process  or  mot^.d  which  does 


Lot  include  each  step,  and  each  step  in  its  essential  order 
is  a  different  process.  In  vol.  1,  page  253  of  Robinson 
on  Detents ,  Mr.  Robinson  says: 

"An  art,  like  every  other  invention,  is  a  unit. 

hfar-Tat^^ 

Cuts  which  introduces  a  different  idea  of  moans  con- 
statutes a  different  art,  and.  if  hithertounhnown.a  new 
1  invention,  i  Thus,,  the  addition  to  an  existing  art  of 
single  steii  by  which  its  essential  character  is  ohanged, 
i single  ““f  w  .  .  .  mhiQh  waB  a  neoesBary  element 


f 


in  the  art  aa  previously  practiced,  or  even  a  material 
alteration  in  the  order  of  the  acts  performed,  is 
sufficient  to  destroy  its  unity,  and  produce  another  art 
which  is  entitled  to  the  same  protection  as  tho  old." 

j;  The  patents  to  Groenbaum  and  Barker  relate 

I  principally  to  apparatus,  and  it  is  well  established  that 
I  to  anticipate  method  or  process  claims,  it  is  necessary  to 
show  not  only  that  the  prior  apparatus  might  have  been 
j  used  in  carrying  out  the  method  or  process  claimed,  but  that 
I  such  use  was  contemplated  or  that  it  would  have  occurod 
j  to  an  ordinary  meohanio.  (See  Carnegie  Steel  Company  Ltd. 
j  vs.  Cambria  Iron  Co.  22  Supreme  Court  698;  185  U.b.  403; 

46  L.  Ed.  968;  99  O.G.  1866;  1902  C.D.  592,  and  Burdon 

Wire  &  Supply  Co.  vs.  Williams.  Unitod  Wire  &  Supply 
Company  vs.  Same,  128  F.  927.)  Certainly  these  patents 
j  do  not  describe  a  use  of  the  apparatus  to  perform  the 
I  method  herein  claimed,  and  it  is  submitted  that  the  said 
method  would  not  occur  to  an  ordinary  mechanic ^even  though 
skilled  in  tho  art,  merely  upon  the  inspection  of  the  said 
patents.  2he  patonts  to  Edison  and  Waloutt  are  apparent- 
I  ly  oited  merely  for  the  purpose  of  disclosing  the  amplifi¬ 
cation  of  a  sound  record. 

An  improved  result  iB  obtained  by  applicant's 
process;  and  as  the  art  cited  does  not  disclose  the  said 
process,  reconsideration  and  allowance  are  respectfully 
I  requested. 

Respectfully  submitted, 

-  DA1IIEL  JIIGHAM , 

I  By  d'/'Z/L'-  t/f  ■  jOct.C'i-.f 

his  attorney. 

Orange,  Bow  Jersey, 

September  fc?.  1913. 


FB-XGK 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 

UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 

WASHINGTON  . pat.-24,-1913*- 

. 

. Orange, . 

. Row-jersey. 

Please  fin*  below  a  comma, Ucation  from  the  EXAMINER  in  charge  o  ftlm  application  of 

Caoe  reconsidered  as  amended  Bep.  24,  1915)  • 

The  olair.is  ure  rejected  on  the  reforeroes  and’  for  the 
reaaona  of  reoord. 

Xt  lu  pointed  out  that  in  Clreenbaum  and.  -narlrer,  of  record, 
the  reoordini;  phonograph  In  shown  ao  being  located  without  the 
range  of  tho  onmora.  as  called  for  in  claims  4,  7,  and  8.  Thie 
to  moreover,  held  to  be  a  very  obviouo  arrangement  of  the. two 
apparatus. 

Tho  point  is  again  emphasised  that  the  novelty  in  thie  o  as 
if  any,  must  reside  in  the  sound  rooord  amplifying  feature 
per  se.  which  is  properly  examinable  in  the  claee  of  Acoustics 
in  Division  23. 

J.  R.  U. 


IH  THE  UNITED 


STATES  PATENT  OFFICE. 


DANIEL  HI SHAM,  ) 

RECORDING  AND  REPRODUCING  ) 
COMBINED  AURAL  AND  OPTICAL 
IMPRESSIONS,  ) 


312 


Filea  April  2,  1912,  ) 

Serial  No.  687,957.  ) 


HONORABLE  COMMISSIONER  OF  PATENTS, 

SIR: 

In  response  to  the  Offioe  aotion  of 
Ootoher  24,  1913,  please  amend  the  above  entitled  case  as 
follows : 

In  line  22,  page  2,  change  " depth"  to 
-'amplitude  -,  and  in  line  25,  same  page,  cancel  "deep 
record, or  a". 

In  line  10,  page  3,  after  "directly"  insert 
_*-by  ordinary  or  non-amplifying  reproducing  apparatus  -, 
ana  in  line  12,  same  page,  after  the  period  (.)  insert  the 
following:  -  the  use  of  amplifying  reproducing  apparat- 

us,  such  for  instance  as  shown  in  my  United,  States.patent 
No.  1,036,235,  the  sound  record  thus  made  may  be  reproduced 
with  sufficient  loudness,  but  I  have  found  that  amplifica¬ 
tion  of  sound  is  not  all  that  is  required  for  realistic 
effects  in  talking  pictures*  By  using  the  sound  record 
made  as  described  above  as  a  master  record  and  making 
therefrom  an  amplified  sound  record,  as  by  mechanical  tranG. 
ferring  means,  I  have  discovered  that  the  amplified  record 
thus  obtained  gives  a  decided  improvement  in  realistic 
effects  by  reason  of  the  naturalness  and  trueness  of  the 
sound  reproduction.  Shis  effect  is  not  obtained  by  mere 
amplification  by  amplifying  reproducing  apparatus  such  as 
shown,  for  example,  in  my  patent  referred  to  above  -  . 

In  the  8th  line  from  the  bottom  of  page  9 


ohange  "duplicate  formed  from"  to  -  amplified  record  upon  - 

In  line  6,  olaim  5,  after  "camera"  insert  -|  and~ 
.  at  a  relatively  great  distance  from  the  souroe  of  said 
sounds  -  . 

In  line  6,  olaim  4,  after  "camera"  insert 
_  and  at  a  relatively  great  distance  from  the  source  of 
said  sounds  -  • 

In  line  6,  claim  7,  after  "camera"  insert 
_  and  at  a  relatively  great  distance  from  the  source 
of  said  BoundB  -  . 

.  In  line  6,  claim  8,  after  "camera"  insert 
-  and  at  a  relatively  great  distance  from  the  source  of 
said  sounds  -  . 


B  E  M  A  B  K  S 

It  iB  thought  that  the  olaiins  as  now  drawn  cover 
a  patentable  method.  That  the  claims  are  properly  drawn 
to  a  method  will,  it  is  thought,  he  obvious  by  consideration 
of  the  following  quotation  from  Walker  on  Patents,  4th  Ed. 
page  3: 

"The  generic  definition  of  process  is 
'an  operation  performed  by  rule  to  produce:  a  result’. 
Operations  performed  by  rule  may  be  classified  as: 

1,  operations  whioh  consist  partly  or  wholly  in  the 
employment  of  heat,  light,  electricity,  magnetism, 
ohemistry,  pneumatics,  hydraulics,  or  some  other 
non-meohanioal  science;  * 

3,  operations  which  consist  entirely  of  mechanical 
transactions*  but  whioh  may  be  performed  by  hand  or  bj 
any  of  several  different  mechanisms  or  maohines. 

It  is  settled  that  all  processes  which  belong  to  the 
first  olass  are  subjects  of  patents;  *  * 

It  was  formerly  debatable  whether  processes  -which 
belong  to  the  third  class  aro  subjects  of  patents 
or  not*  but  reason  iB  now  known  to  answer  that 
question  in  the  affirmative.  A  negative  answer 
would  deny  patentability  to  the  art  of  weaving, 
if  the  art  of  weaving  were  new;  and  any  such  denial 
would  undeniably  oontx-avene  both  the  lotter  and  the 
spirit  cf  the  patent  law." 


In  view  of  the  above,  applicant  oannot  possibly 
understand  why  the  invention  disclosed  is  not  a  patentable 

Ithod.  The  transactions  set  forth  in  the  claims  are 

rformed  by  rule  to  produce  a  single  new  result,  to-wit  - 
e  faithful  and  realistic  recording  and  reproducing  of 
mbined  aural  and  optical  impressions.  These  transaction, 

•e  not  limited  to  the  peculiar  functions  of  any  particular 
.chines,  but  may  be  performed  by  different  means  and  in 
Lfferent  ways.  The  step,  for  example,  which  consists 
.  .■Mining  a  snund  record  of  Increased  amplitude  may  be 
erformed  by  the  mechanical  transferring  apparatus  disclosed , 
r  it  may  be  performed  in  other  ways,  though  the  mechanical 
ransf erring  means  disclosed  are  preferable.  If  the 
xaminer  desires  to  adhere  to  his  position  originally  taken 
hat  the  claims  are  drawn  to  an  improper  method,  he  is  re¬ 
sentfully  requested  to  explain  his  position  more  fully. in 

riew  of  the  above  remarks. 

Considering  the  references  cited  by  the  Examiner, 

3one  of  these  references  disclose  applicant’s  improved 
process.  The  patents  to  Greenbaum  and  Barker  do  not  dis¬ 
close  the  step  of  obtaining  a  sound  record  of  increased 
amplitude  by  amplifying  mechanical  transference  or  in  any 
other  way.  The  patents  to  Edison  and  Waloutt  do  not  relate 
to  talking  pictures  and  offer  no  suggestion  of  applicant’s 
process.  As  to  the  patents  to  Greenbaum  and  Barker,  the 
Examiner  is,  of  course,  aware  of  the  fact  that  a  method 
or  process  is  like  a  combination  in  apparatus  claims  in  that 
it  is  a  unit  and  that  any  material  variation  in  the  number 
or  character  of  its  elements  destroys  or  changes  the  process. 
The  employment  of  the  step  of  obtaining  an  amplified  sound 
record  for  reproduction,  which  is  not- disclosed  by  Greenbaum 
and  Barker  produoesan  entirely  different  process  from  that 
disclosed  by  the  said  patentees,  the  process  thus  obtained 

being  of  a  very  improved  character  in  the  giving  of  realiBtij 
-  3 


effects  in  reproduction.  It  is  thought  that  the  Examiner 
does  not  fully  appreciate  the  improved  results  obtained  by 
the  applicant.  Applicant's  object  was  not  morely  to  obtai a 
loudness  of  reproduction.  I he  object  was  primarily  to 
produce  realistic  effects  in  talking  pictures,  and  this 
effect  may  bo  spoiled  by  excessive  lqudness.  It  is  faith-  _ 
fulness  of  reproduction  and  the  proper  differences  in  eharar 
ter  or  tone  by  which  our  oars  judge  of  the  distance  of  souni 
and  partly  also  of  the  movements  of  the  performers  in  the 
pioturee  that  applicant  deBired  to  obtain  and  has  obtained 
by  this  invention.  It  was  not  obvious  to  the  applicant 
prior  to  this  invention,  how  the  desired  improved  results 
tending  towards  realism  in  the  talking  pictures  oould  be 
obtained.  Applicant,  who  has  been  working  almost  exolusiv 
ly  on  talking  pictures  for  a  considerable  number  of  years, 
conducted  numerous  experiments  running  over  a  long  period 
before  he  discovered  the  method  claimed  and  advantages 
obtained  thereby.  He  then  found,  amongst  other  things, 
that  very  improvod  results  in  realistio  effects, whioh  could 
not  be  obtained  by  the  amplifying  reproducing  apparatus 
shown  in  his  patent  referred  to  above,  were  obtained  by 
the  amplification  of  the  record,  ns  by  amplifying  mechanical 
transference.  Applicant's  method  iB  thought  to  be  the  firB' 
by  which  practical  realistio  talking  plotures  have  been 
obtained,  and  as  this  method  is  not  disclosed  nor  suggested 
by  the  prior  art,  it  is  thought  that  the  claims  should  he 
allowed. 

Reconsideration  and  allowanoe  are  accordingly 
I  respectfully  requested. 


Hespeotfully  submitted, 
L ARIEL  HIGHAM, 

Bv  .  ‘£. 

Orange,  Hew  Jersey,  his  Attorney. 

I  Ootober  h  1914. 


DEPARTMENT  Of*  THE  INTERIOR 
UNITED  STATES/  PATENT  OFFICE 
WASHINGTON  . got. 


. *rank..X...  JOyer,.: 


m  the  EXAMINER  in  charge  of  the  applica\ 


Please  find  helou>  a  commum 

. JtonlaX..Hlghamr..flleA..Aprll-:-2t...1912.r~Mathode-.pf-..Bynolueonousl.y~.. 

. ^9O.ot.41n(5..m4..Hep.TOAU0Jtng..-Qp.ti.0fll..TinprABBifinB...Q.tQ^ . 

#687,967. 


Commiuhnt^of  Patents. _ 


Case  reoonsidered  as  amended  Oot.  7,  1914. 

^he  ground  taken  by  tha  examiner  that  the  claims  do  not  state 
a  proper  method  ia  receded  from;  hut  the  other  grounds  of  rejec¬ 
tion  are  believed  to  he  sound  and  are  adhered  to.  The  olaime 
^re  again  rejected. 

fhe  following  publication  will  show  that  the  desirability  Of 
amplifying  the  sound  upon  being  reproduced  haB  been  felt,  and 
that  an  endeavor  haB  been  made  to  aooomplleh  this  end:  '  ^ 

■The  Hiokelodeon",  Tab.  IB,  1911,  Vol.  V.  So.  7  pages  189- 
190.  (A  copy  of  which  is  to  be  found  in  this  office).  The  mi- 
orophone  and  horn  that  are  generally  used  amplify  the  oounds  to 
a  certain  degree}  and  th<w  it' iB  held  th*t  applicant's  invention 
does  not  consist  in  the  synchronizing  combination  but  in  the  am¬ 
plification  of  sound  record,®  per-ae,  rtiloh  feature  belongs  to  the. 
Glass  of  "Acoustics"  examinable  in  another  division  of  this 

JEH. 

•• 


Bxaminer. 


IN  THE  UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 


Daniel  Highara 

RECORDING  AND  REPRODUCING  COMBINED 
AURAL  AND  OPTICAL  IMPRESSIONS 

Room  No.  312. 

Filed  April  2,  1912 
Serial  No.  687,967 

HONORABLE  COMMISSIONER  OF  PATENTS, 

SIR; 

The  Office  action  of  October  29,  1914 
haa  been  carefully  considered. 

Referring  to  the  contention  of  the  Examiner  that 
"The  microphone  and  horn  that  are  generally  used  amplify 
the  sounds  to  a  certain  degree;  and  thuB  it  is  held  that 
applicant's  invention  does  not  oonaist  in  the  synchronizing 
combination  but  in  the  amplification  of  Bound  records  per 
se",  the  ordinary  use  of  miorophones  and  horns  to  amplify 
sound  does  not  correspond  in  any  way  with  the  step  in  ap¬ 
plicant's  prooess  of  obtaining  a  sound  record  of  increased 
amplitude  as  by  the  ubs  of  amplifying  meohanioal  transfer¬ 
ence.  In  talking  pictures  the  microphone  or  horn  has  ap¬ 
parently  been  used  only  as  a  part  of  the  final  step  of  syn¬ 
chronously  reproducing  the  positive  and  the  amplified  record. 
In  applicant's  prooeBS  thisiis  a  step  entirely  distinct  from 
the  step  of  obtaining  an  amplified  sound  record.  What 
applicant  has  really  done  is  to  introduce  a  new  step  in 
the  prooess  of  producing  talking  pictures,  this  new  step 
producing  essentially  a  new  result. 


j|  Furthermore,  applicant  haa  tried  many  forma  of 

Imiorophonea  under  various  oonditiona  in  oonneotion  with  the 
production  of  talking  pioturea,  and  he  haa  aeen  many  experl- 
!  menta  oonduoted  hy  Mr.  Edison  for  the  aame  purpose}  yet 
in  not  one  of  these  oases  did  the  sound  have  a  suitable 
quality  of  tone  to  produce  the  neoosaary  illusion  that 
|  the  sound  emanated  from  the  objects  in  motion.  In  other 
;  words,  the  sound  produoed  was  not  of  such  quality  as  one 
j  would  expeot  to  come  from  the  images  seen.  Applicant  has 
discovered  that  hy  the  production  of  an  amplified  record  in 
the  manner  described  and  claimed,  the  proper  quality  xforomncd 
oan  be  given  to  the  aural  portion  of  the  talking  pioture 
production.  In  this  oonneotion,  the  Examiner’s  attention 
is  again  dirooted  to  Figures  3,  4  and  5  of  the  drawings  and 
pages  7,  8  and  9  of  the  spooifioation. 

The  mere  faot  that  there  may  have  been  an  improve¬ 
ment  in  a  particular  part  of  the  prooess  or  the  addition  of 
a  single  new  step  does  not  negative  patentability  in  a  new 
!  and  complete  prooess  containing  this  step  aB  one  of  its  ele¬ 
ments.  There  is  no  reference  of  reoord  showing  anything 
which  is  the  substantial  equivalent  of  the  prooess  set  forth 
I  in  the  claims ,  and  the  Examiner  is  no  doubt  well  aware  of  th< 
j  numerous  decisions  holding  that  a  prooeBS,  like  a  combina¬ 
tion,  is  a  unit,  and  the  addition  to  an  existing  art  of  a 
single  step  by  whioh  its  essential  character  1b  changed  or 
any  other  material  alteration  in  the  existing  art  produoes 
a  new  art  whioh  is  entitled  to  the  Bame  proteotion  as  the 
old.  See  Robinson  on  Eatents,  Vol.  1,  page  263}  Viotor 
Talking  Maohine  Co.  vs.  American  Graphophone  Co.,  189  F, 
369-372. 


(2) 


The  new  reference  oited  by  the  Examiner,  to-wit, 
the  public ati on  in  "The  nickelodeon",  does  not  disoloao  an 
anticipation  of  applicant's  invention.  In  fact,  the 
whole  artiole  dearly  points  out  difficulties  in  the  solu¬ 
tion  of  the  problem  undertaken  and  solved  by  applicant,  but 
gives  no  idea  as  to  how  these  difficulties  oan  be  overoome. 
On  page  190  of  the  said  publication,  for  example,  it  is 
stated  as  follows :- 

"3!ho  registering  of  sounds  at  a  distance  waB  hard¬ 
er  to  accomplish  than  synchronism.  Hitherto  the  mem¬ 
branes  that  formed  an  essential  part  of  the  grapho- 
phono  had  given  very  unsatisfactory  results.  The 
sound  of  an  orchestra  could  be  recorded  at  a  distance 
of  several  yards,  but  a  voice  could  not  be  recorded 
unless  it  oame  within  a  foot  and  a  half  of  the  instru¬ 
ment.  And  the  apparatus  gave  forth  only  fifty  per¬ 
cent  of  the  sound  it  reoeived." 


In  another  place  the  said  publication  states : 

I  "Owing  to  the  impossibility  of  registering  soundB 

at  a  distanoe,  the  graphophone  had  to  bo  placed  be- 
I  tween  the  biograph  oamora  and  the  subject,  and  so  it 

|  was  impossible  to  obtain  the  doBired  result." 

This  difficulty  which  the  publication  states  made 
'  it  impossible  to  obtain  the  dosirod  result  was  entirely  over- 
i  come  by  applicant  and  in  a  way  that  produced  suoh  superior 
1  resultB  that  by  moans  of  applicant's  invention  it  was  poss¬ 
ible  for  the  first  timo  to  produce  commercial  talking  pio- 
i  tures  on  a  large  scale.  In  spite  of  the  fact  that  the  use 
;  of  the  amplifying  horn  and  miorophono  were  well  known  at 
i  the  date  of  the  publication  in  question,  a  desirable  repro¬ 
duction  of  the  sound  iB  referred  to  as  a  real  difficulty  in 
the  production  of  commercial  talking  pictures.  It  is 
thought  that  the  Examiner  will  agree  that  the  mere  state¬ 
ment  in  the  publication  referred  to  that  Ur.  Gaumont  has 


(3) 


some  seoret  means  of  overcoming  the  difficulties  referred 
to, is  not  an  anticipation  of  applicant's  claims. 

It  is  thought  that  applicant's  claims  are  patent¬ 
able,  and  rooonei aeration  and  allowance  are  accordingly 
requested. 

Respeotfully  submitted, 

DANIEL  BISHAM 

By 

His  Attorney 

Orange,  N.  J. 

September  //  ,  1916 

EB-JS 


Div.  ...7- _ 


1—312 


2-2(10 


M.  Paper  N0....B . 


% 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 

UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 

WASHINGTON  _ jQaJU_gl1_J2A5, 


Please  find  below  a  communication  from  the  EXAMINER  in  charge  of  the  application  of 

i  _  _ _ 

_ ins..nnd-.Jlap.r.flaw7J.aB...Qr;.tical.T.mn;:.«saiono..and..Soundii..Agnooint.ed . 


Therewith,  Serial.  No.  607,907. 


CovnniMioncr  of  Patents,  (j 


CaBe  reconsidered  In  connection  with  ooinrunl nation  of 
Sep.  13,  1915. 

It  Is  repented  that  the  "Nickelodeon"  publication  wee 
oited  simply  to  show  that  the  necessity  of  amplifying  the 
sound  record  had  been  felt  and  an  effort  made  to  meet  this 
necessity.  Instead  of  emphasizing  only  the  paragraph  quoted 
by  applicant  ,  attention  should  also  be  given  to  the  paragraph 
beginning  near  the  foot  of  column  1  on  page  190  of  this  article, 
in  which  mention  1b  made  of  several  meant)  by  which  the  amplifica¬ 
tion  of  eoundo  wan  obtained  and  improved.  Then  in  view  of  thio 
disclosure  and  the  well  known  means  of  amplifying  the  sound  rec¬ 
ord  ao  shown  by  the  art  cited,  the  adoption  of  the  last  named 
means  to  meet  the  well  known  demand  ia  held  to  be  very  obvious. 

The  expediency  of  amplifying  sound  records  is  recognized  as  being 
tho  same,  whether  used  alone  with  moving  piotures.  The  rejection 
of  the  ol aim.fi  in  therefore  repeated. 


The  rejection  on  the  ground  that  tne  invention  resides  in 


the  amplifying  mean 3  per  se  is  also  repeated,  special  attention 

1 

\  being  called  to  the  first  office  letter,  last  two  paragraphs. 

s 

"  w. 

! 

Examiner. 

i  ■ 

< 

L 

s 

IH  THE  UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 


I  Daniel  Hifcham 

RECORDING  AND  REPRODUCING  COMBINED 

AUBAL  AND  OPTICAL  IMPRESSIONS  RoQm  „„ 

File a  April  2,  1912 
Serial  Ho 4  687,967 

HONORABLE  COMMISSIONER  OF  PATENTS , 

SIH  :  ■ 

In  response  to  the  Office  notion  of 
October  21,  1915,  please  amend  the  above  entitled  case  as 
follows 

page  7,  line's"  10  ana  11,  ohange  "pending  applica¬ 
tion  S.H.  461,869,  filed  November  10,  1908"  to  -  United 
States  Patent  No.  1,054,203,  dated  February  25,  1913  -  . 

page  9,  liAe~24,  after  "quality"  insert  -  ana  of 
producing  faithful  and  realistic  talking  picture  effeots  -  . 

Cano el  claims  T,  2,  6  ana  6  and  renumber  claimB 
3,  4,  7  and  8  as  1,  2,  3  ana  4  respectively. 

REMARKS 

In  view  of  the  last  Office  action,  this  oase  has 
again  been  carefully  considered.  Applicant's  invention 
does  not  consist  merely  in  the  amplification  of  sound,  but 
it  consists  in  a  method  whereby  the  production  of  realistic 
effeots  in  talking  pictures;  in  accomplished.  By  appli¬ 
cant's  invention,  not  only  was  it  possible  to  exclude  the 
sound  recording  apparatus  from  the  field  of  the  camera,  but 


it  Was  possible  to  obtain  sufficiently  true  reproduced  sounds 
to  give  a  good  illusion  that  the  reproduced  sounds  emanate 
from  the  objects  in  motion. 

Furthermore ,  the  amplification  of  sound  referred 
to  in  the  last  paragraph,  column  1,  page  190  of  the  l.'idhol- 
odeon  is  not  the  equivalent  of  the  step  in  applicant's  / 
method  of  producing  an  amplified  sound  record.  It  relates 
more  nearly  to  the-  final  step  in  applicant's  process  of 
finally  reproducing  the  positive  and  record  in  synchronism, 
in  that  in  the  latter  step  use  would  probably,  though  not 
necessarily,  be  made  of  a  trumpet,  and  use  might  bo  made  of 
the  other  apparatus  described  in  the  said  paragraph.  Ap¬ 
plicant's  step  of  amplifying  the  sound  record  is  entirely 
distinct  from  anything  disclosed  in  the  said  article.  Re¬ 
ferring  to  Robinson  on  Patents.  Vol.  1.  page  BBS.  Mr.  Rob¬ 
inson  points  out  that  an  art  or  a  method  is  a  unit  and  that 

I  the  "addition  to  an  existing  art  of  a  single  step  by  which 
its  essential  character  is  changed  *  *  * 

or  even  a  material  alteration  in  the  order  of  the  acts 
performed,  is  sufficient  to  destroy  its  unity  and  to  pro¬ 
duce  another  art  which  is  entitled  to  the  same  protection 
as  the  old".  The  step  of  amplifying  the  sound  record  is 
an  addition  to  the  prior  methods  and  it  produces  in  talking 
oietures  a  result  which  is  superior  to  any  obtained  before 
applicant's  invention.  Again,  admitting  that  it  was  old 
prior  to  applicant's  invention  to  amplify  sounds  in  connec¬ 
tion  with  talking  pictures,  no  one  prior  to  applicant  em¬ 
ployed  this  step  in  the  same  order  as  applicant  in  a  method 


of  producing  talking  pictures.  Ho  one  made  an  amplified 
sound  record  in  talking  pictures  prior  to  the  reproduction 
of  the  reoord  in  synchronism  with  tho  exhibition  of  the 
picture.  Applicant  has.  by  the  improved  method  herein  de¬ 
scribed.  made  a  clear  advance  in  the  production  of  realistic 
talking  picture  effects;  and  the  invention  is  not  disclosed 
nor,  it  is  submitted,  is  it  suggested. by  the  prior  art.  Hor 
does  the  fact  that  there  may  be  invention  in  the  apparatus 
used  negative  patentability  in  the  method. 

Although  it  is  thought  that  the  publication  in 
the  nickelodeon  is  not  in  any  way  an  anticipation  of  appli¬ 
cant's  claims,  the  invention  herein  claimed  was  completed 
before  tho  date  of  said  publication,  and  an  affidavit  to 
this  effect  is  presented  herewith. 

>jhe  canceled  claims  are  thought  to  he  patentable, 

I  but  they  have  been  canceled  with  a  view  to  expediting  the 
allowance  of  the  case  inasmuch  as  the  remaining  claims  ade¬ 
quately  proteot  the  invention. 

Reconsideration  and  allowance  are  respectfully 

requested. 

Respectfully  submitted, 

DAIIXF.L  HIGEA1A 

By  ’  '<  -  - 2 

(/ 

His  Attorney  1 

Orange,  H.  J. 

October  !°  ,  1916 


FB-JS 


HI  THR  UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 


I  Daniel  Higham 

RECORDING  AND  REPRODUCING  COMBINED 
AURAL  AND  OPTICAL  IMPRESSIONS 

Filed  April  2,  1912 
Serial  Ho.  687,967 


Room  No.  312. 


AFFIDAVIT  OF  DANIEL  HIGHAM 


I  State  of  New  Jersey  ) 
County  of  Essex  ) 


DANIEL  HIGHAM,  Being  first  duly  sworn,  deposes 
and  says  that  he  is  the  same  Daniel  Higham  whose  application 
for  Letters  Patent  for  Recording  and  Reproducing  Combined 
Aural  and  optioal  Impressions,  Serial  Ho.  687,967,  was  filed 
in  the  united  States  patent  Office  on  or  about  the  2nd  day 
|0f  April,  1912;  that  prior  to  February  18,  1911  he  success¬ 
fully  oarried  out  a  mothod  of  recording  and  reproducing  com- 
[bined  aural  and  optical  impressions  embodying  the  invention 
et  forth  in  the  claims  of  said  application;  that  the  fol- 
|lowing  is  an  accurate  description  of  said  method 

A  recording  phonograph  for  recording  sounds  asHOCi- 
jated  with  objects  in  motion  was  placed  without  the  range  of 
photographic  camera  employed  for  making  a  motion  picture 
|of  the  objects  in  motion,  the  phonogruph  being  then  at  such 
distance  from  the  objeots  in  motion  that  the  sound  record 
obtained  was  formed  with  undulations  of  small  amplitude. 
Thereupon  the  moving  objects  were  photographed  by  the  said 


oamera  and  a  record  of  the  sounds  associated  with  Baid  ob¬ 
jects  was  made  by  the  recording  phonograph.  Prom  the  phono¬ 
graph  reoord  thus  obtained,  a  copy  was  made  in  which  the 
vibrations  were  of  increased  amplitude,  this,  copy  being 
made  from  the  original  reoord  by  mechanical  transferance , 
apparatus  such  as  that  shown  in  Pig.  2  of  the  drawings  of 
said  application  being  employed  for  this  purpose.  This 
apparatus  comprised  a  lever  having  a  tracing  stylus  ar¬ 
ranged  to  follow  the  grooves  in  the  original  record  and 
a  recording  stylus  arranged  to  out  the  amplified  Vibrations 
into  the  amplified  copy  of  the  said  record,  the  tracing 
stylus  being  nearer  the  fulcrum  of  the  lever  than  the  cutt¬ 
ing  stylus.  A  positive  was  then  made  from  the  photographic 
film  affected  by  tho  light  in  taking  the  original  photograph 
and  the  said  positive  and  the  amplified  reoord  were  repro¬ 
duced  in  synchronism,  a  faithful  and  realistic  reproduction 
of  the  original  optical  impression  and  the  sounds  associated 
therewith  being  thus  obtained. 

That  prior  to  February  18,  1911,  the  complete  pro¬ 
cess  described  above  was  successfully  performed  many  times 
in  Ilew  fork  City,  11.  Y. ;  that  deponent  doos  not  know  and 
does  not  believe  that  tho  above  described  invention  has  been 
in  public  use  or  on  sale  in  this  country,  or  patented  or 
described  in  any  printed  publication  in  this  or  any  loreign 
country  for  more  than  two  years  prior  to  his  above  named 
application;  and  that  he  has  never  abandoned  the  said  in- 

Sworn  to  and  subscribed  before  me  ! 

this  /O 


lay  of  October,  1916 

<  \  titvi  itnstv 

;.r.v  „S"'S  JULV,  -. 131 1 


Dlv. _ -7—  Room - 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 
UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 
WASHINGTON  _ 


MPapoi'  ITo. -T-Q-- — 

tfjdlmmimications  rRpectlnz  this 

late  of  (illne,  title  of  Invention,  and 
name  of  the  applicant. 


T-iBTBGT*" 


Plcase  find  below  a 


n  the  EXAMINER  in  charge  of  the  application  of 


. TTariTel''Hts3fi^V^^®^^lfi^ie*_193;S»*l8tllBaff0^35rnoiironotls'1;2r 

. . 

oiated  Therewith,  Serial  50.687,967.<^;^ir-J___^__, 

o  tmmSnl  Commissioner  of  Patents,  (f 


Caae  raoonsldered  aB  amended  Oot*  11*  1916* 

The  "Hioteloddon"  publication  is  withdrawn  as  a  reference 
in  tii-i n  oase;  hut  the  other  grounds  of  rejection  are  adhered 
to  and  are  hereby  made  final* 

JIBS. 

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September  22,  1917 


Mr.  Edlson:- 

POLIO  833 

I  hand  you  herewith  our  copy  of  the  application  papers 
of  Daniel  Higham,  Serial  Mo.  687,967,  filed  April  2,  1912  and 
entitled  Recording  and  Reproducing  Combined  Aural  and  Optical 
Impressions.  This  case  has  been  finally  rejected  in  the  Office 
action  of  Ootober  21,  1916,  and  the  question  arises  whether  we 
shall  take  an  appeal  or  abandon  the  application. 

The  invention  relates  to  the  method  employed  in  producing 
talking  pictures  by  the  Kinetophone  and  all  the  claims  are  drawn 
to  the  method.  Each  of  the  claims  includes  the  step  of  obtaining 
an  amplified  record  of  the  original  sound  record  which  is  to  be 
used  in  conjunction  with  the  positive  film  in'  synchronously  repro¬ 
ducing  the  pictures  and  sounds  associated  therewith.  We  have 
contended  that  this  step  is  novel,  but  the  Examiner  has  finally 
rejected  all  the  claims  on  the  ground  that  there  is  no  novelty  in 
the  method,  claiming  that  whatever  invention  there  is  in  the  am¬ 
plification  resides  in  the  specific  sound  amplifying  means. 

There  seems  to  be  but  little,  if  any,  novelty  in  this 
case,  and  in  view  of  the  status  of  the  Kinetophone  business,  you 
will  probably  wish  this  case  abandoned.  Under  the  arrangement 
made  with  Mr.  Higham  we  are  entitled  only  to  a  license  under  this 
invention.  Mr.  Higham  has  stated  that  he  does  not  care  to  take 
an  appeal  in  this  case. 

Kindly  advise  whether  or 


not  you  wish  an  appeal  taken. 


Patent  Series 
Patent  Application  Files 


Folio  #  845  Storage  Battery 

U.S.  Patent#:  1167485 

Primary  Applicant:  Edison,  Thomas  A 
Date  Executed:  4/23/1912 


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Patent  Series 
Patent  Application  Files 

Folio  #  846  Record  Tablet  Molds 

Serial  #:  694658 

Primary  Applicant:  Edison,  Thomas  A 

Date  Executed:  4/30/1912 


[PHOTOCOPY] 


Petition 


tEo  tije  Commissioner  of  patents: 

gour  petitioner  tiiomau  a.  e.'Isoii,  v  . 

a  citizen  of  tije  ®niteH  States,  reSibing  anb  ijabing  a  lost  ©fftcc  abbrcss  at 

Llewellyn  Park,  West  Orange,  Essex  County,  Hew  Jersey, 


praps  tijat  letters  patent  map  be  granteb  to  Ijim  for  tfje  improbements  in 


-  ItECOED  TABLET  MOLL 3'  - 


get  forty  in  tije  annexeb  Specification;  anb  ije  Ijerebp  appoints  JfranU  It.  ©per 
(Registration  &a.  560),  of  ©range,  i?eln  3lerSep,  bis  attornep,  bJiHj  full 
'  poiner  of  substitution  anb  rebocation,  to  prosecute  tljis  application,  to.  make 
alterations  anb  amenbments  therein,  to  receibe  tije  patent,  anb  to  transact  all 
business  in  tije  latent  ©ffice  connecteb  tljeretoiHj. 


<7*sinwM  /7.; 


SPEC I FI CAT TON. 


TO  ALL  WHOM  IT  MAY  COHCERIl! 

BE  IT  KHOWH,  that  I,  THOMAS  A.  EDISON,  a 
citizen  of  the  United  States  and  a  resident  of  Llewellyn 
Park,  West  Orange,  in  the  County  of  Essex  and  State  of 
;  sew  Jersey,  have  Invented  oertain  now  and  useful  improve- 
I  ments  in  RECORD  TABLET  MOLDS,  of  whioh  the  following  is  a 


My  invention  relates  to  'sound  record 
and  other  tablets,  and  more  particularly  to  apparatus 
for  use  in  molding  the  same.  In  its  preferred  form,  my 
j  invention  is  particularly  designed  for  use  in  connection 
ij  with  the  molding  process  set  forth  and  claimed  in  an 
\  application  of  Jonas  'V.  Aylsworth,  Serial  Ho.  674,289, 

!  piled  January  30,  1912.  According  to  this  process,  a  base 
l  or  backing  is  provided  with  a  eurfaoe  oovering  or  veneer  j 
j  of  suitable  moldable  material,  usually  a  high  grade  homo-  I 
j|  geneous  material,  the  process  involving  the  formation  of 
the  surface  veneer  upon  the  smooth 
j  metallic  plate  or  other  blank  mold  and  the^tiCnsfer  of 
!i  the  Bame  to  the  surface  of  the  objeot  to  be  coated  under 
j:  heat  and  preeeure  with  the  firm  adhesion  or  welding  of  the 
I  surface  veneer  to  the  object.  *hen  the  coated  article 
|  is  to  be  provided  with  a  delicate  impression,  such  as  a 
j  sound  record  impression,  the  surface  veneer  should  have  a 
ij  smooth  homogeneous  surface  free  from  imperfections;  and 
ii  the  ourfaoe  of  the  platee  or  moldB  should  aoooi-dingly  be 


J 


capable  of  receiving  a  high  polish  and  smooth  finish.  j 

in  order  to  permit  the  use  of  the  plates  or  molds  com-  ! 

me ro tally,  the  surfaces  thereof  should  be  capable  of  being 
cleaned  without  tarnishing  and  of  retaining  their  lustre 
in  the  air.  One  of  the  objects  of  my  invention  is  to  pro¬ 
vide  a  mold  or  transfer  plate  having  the  above  named 
properties. 

In  its  preferred  form,  tho  above  mentioned  procesi 
|  consists  essentially  in  coating  the  surface  of  a  blank 
I  ffi0ld  or  polished  plats  with  a  film  of  ingredients,  which, 
j  upon  being  heated,  forms  on  the  mold  surface  a  surface 
|;  layer  or  veneer  of  a  hard,  infusible,  phenolic  condense-  j 
j  tion  product  containing  plasticity  ingredients,  such  that  j 
the  veneer  becomes  suf fioiehly  plastic  upon  being  reheated  | 

|  to  take  an  impression.  The  coating  or  film  should  prefers- | 

!  bly  be  applied  to  the  mold  in  a  plurality  of  very  thin  i 
j|  layers;  so  as  to  facilitate  the  drying  thereof  and  to 
\  ensure  against  the  presence  of  air  bubbles  in  the  same, 
j  The  object  to  be  surfaced  is  pressed  into  contact  with  j 

|  this  hardened  veneer  in  the  mold  with  the  application  of  j 
\  heat  sufficient  to  cause  the  object  and  the  surface  layer  j 
|  to  become  firmly  welded  together,  the  molded  object  then  | 
!  being  cooled  and  removed  from  the  mold  with  the  surface  layj 
j  er  or  veneer  adhering  thereto.  The  coated  blank  can  then  bj 
ji  heated  and  pressed  in  a  sound  record  or  other  mold  to  re  j 
|  oeivo  the  desired  impression  upon  the  surface  thus  formed. 

\  The  material  applied  to  the  blank  surface  may  be  a  solution 
j  of  a  fusible,  soluble,  phenolic  condensation  product,  such 
I  as  the  phenol  resin  described  in  an  application  of  said 
I  Jonas  W.  Aylsworth,  Serial  Ho.  496,060,  filed  May  14,  1909, 

I  together  with  a  hardening  agent  therefor  containing  the 


3. 


methylene  radical,  euch  ae  hexa-methylene-tetra-amine,  in  | 
a  suitable  solvent,  such  ao  amyl-alcohol.  Penta-ohloro- 
phenol  may  be  uoed  as  the  plasticity  ingredient  in  the 
surface  composition.  An  object  of  my  invention  is  to 
provide  a  mold  or  transfer  plate  of  such  a  character  that 
surface  materials  such  as  those  mentioned  above  have  no 
||  tendency  to  adhere  to  the  same,  the  mold  or  transfer  plate  j 
||  thus  permitting  the  formation  on  the  molded  articles  of  a  j  j 
!|  surface  having  the  same  finish  as  the  mold  surface.  The  j  i 
|  mold  should  also  not  be  affected  by  the  substances  in  which j 
jj  the  surface  composition  is  dissolved  or  by  substances,  suohj 
j  a8  caustic  soda,  which  may  be  employed  for  cleaning  the 
|  0ame.  Other  objects  of  my  invention  will  appear  more 
j  fully  in  the  following' specification  and  appended  claims: 

|  As  a  result  of  experiments  conducted  with  tne 

j  above  objects  in  view,  I  have  found  that  the  desired 
I  qualities  for  the  purposes  specified  above  arc  possessed 
j  by  molds  formed  of  or  having  a  surfaoe  portion  comprising 
|  metal -io  substances  containing  nickel.  The  nickel  may 
j  appear  in  the  mold  in  varying  amounts  or  in  different  al-  j 
I;  l0yaj  and  the  said  substance  may  merely  be  employed  for  J 
|  the  surface  portion  of  the  mold,  or  the  entire  mold  may  be  | 

S  formed  of  the  same.  Pure  nickel  molds  give  the  most  sstis- 
j  factory  results,-  but  the  high  cost  thereof  renders  the 
|  same  unsuitable  for  commercial  use,  a  large  number  of 
j  molds  being  necessary  for  any  considerable  production, 
f  The  substance  which  I  prefer  to  employ  is  hard  rolled  j 

j  German  silver  containing  from  18  per  cant  to  SO  per  cent 
of  nickel.  This  substance  can  be  purchased  at  a  reasonably 
low  cost,  so  that  the  molds  or  platee  may  be  made  entirely 
of  the  same  without  a  prohibitive  cost.  It  can  be  gotten 


3. 


practically  free  from  flaws  and  can  be  readily  given  a  very 
high  polish.  Other  alloys  of  niokel  may  be  used,  but  the 
results  obtained  therewith  are  not  as  satisfactory  as  with 
German  silver.  Monel  metal,  for  example,  which  ie  an  alloy 
of  oopper  and  niokel  obtained  from  reducing  certain  ores, 
i|  is  very  hard  and  satisfactory  in  most  respects;  but  it 
jj  cannot  be  gotten  as  free  from  flaws  as  German  silver. 

|  Hiokel  plated  brasn  may  alao  bo  used;  but  the  nickel  ooat- 
|!  ing  is  apt  to  peel  off  when  many  times  subjected  to  the 

jj  | 

|  necessary  pressure  for  transferring  the  surface  veneer  : 

l!  to  the  article  ooated.  Also  by  the  process  described  in  j 
!|  | 

jl  my  rj.  5.  Patent  iio.  734,532,  niokel  may  be  coated  upon,  iron: 

|  or  steel  by  electrolytioally  depositing  the  nickel  on  the  j 
jj  iron  or  steel  and  in  then  subjecting  the  niokel-plated  iron, 
jj  or  steel  to  a  welding  temperature  in  a  non-oxidizing  atmos-j 
{j  phore;  but  the  product  obtained  in  this  way  cannot  bo 
|  finished  to  as  good  a  surface  as  German  silver. 

The  mold  surfaoe  may  be  polished  in  any  suitable 
way.  TOion  employing  German  silver,  this  composition  is 
preferably  obtained  in  the  form  of  rolled  plates  whioh 
have  a  comparatively  even  surface.  The  mold  surfaoe  is 
preferably  first  given  a  rough  polish  with  emery  and  is  the: i 
buffed  off  with  sand  and  later  with  lime,  the  mold  surface 
j!  obtained  in  this  way  being  as  smooth  as  glass. 

iln  order  that  my  invention  may  be  better  under¬ 
stood,  attention  is  hereby  directed  to  the  accompanying 
drawing  forming  a  part  of  this  specification  and  in  whioh 
the  figure  shows  a  central  vertical  sectional  vi ew  illus¬ 
trating  the  use  of  my  improved  molds  or  transfer  plates 
in  the  molding  of  a  sound  record  tablet.  In  the  drawing, 

4. 


1  the  numerals  1  and  1'  designate  two  of  the  molds  or  trana- 

Ifer  plates,  the  numerals  3  and  3'  surface  veneers  formed 
on  the  plates  I  and  1' ,  the  numeral  3  the  baae  pr  article 
to  be  coated,  and  the  numerals  4  and  4'  fillings  of  surface 
composition  coated  on  the  base  3  prior  to  the  transfer  of 
the  veneers  3  and  3'  thereto  to  facilitate  the  adhesion  of 
|  the  surface  veneers  to  the  base.  The  numeral  &  designates 
!j  the  lower  member  of  a  euitable  press.  The  plates  1  and  1' 

|  may  be  made  of  a  thickness  of  approximately  one-sixteenth 
of  an  inoh  or  slightly  more  and  are  preferably  formed  with 
I  their  peripheries  slightly  flanged  so  as  to  assist  in  the 
I  formation  of  the  periphery  of  the  molded  article. ^  M  ‘ 


!j  claim  as  new  and  desire  to  protect  by  betters  Patent  of 
f  the  United  States,  is  as  follows: 

||  x 

V  A  record  tablet  mold  having-a'poliehed  surface 
I  the  Bur^hco  portion  of  said  plate  being  formed  of  a 
I  me  tall  io  ouWbance  containing  nickel,  substantially  as 


j  3.  A  record  tablet  mold  having  a  polished  surface 

and  formed  entirely  ofKmetaliio  substance  containing 
'  niokel,  substantially  as  den^ribed. 

3.  A  reoord  tablet  moldVvdng  a  surface  portion 
containing  an  alloy  of  nickel,  sub^ntially  as  described. 

j  4.  A  record  tablet  mold  having  a  ^plished  surface, 

j  the  surface  portion  of  said  mold  being  form^of  an  alloy 
j  of  nickel,  substantially  as  described. 

II  5.  A  record  tablet  mold  formed  entirely  of  an\ 

alloy  of  niokel,  substantially  as  described.  \ 


I 


6T\A  record  tablet  mold  having  a  polished  surface 
and  f o rmc d'enttrely  of  an  alloy  of  nickel,  substantially 
as  described. 

?.  A  record  tablet  moi^Nmving  a  surface  portion 
of  German  silver,  substantially  astiencribed. 

8.  A  reoord  tablet  mold  having  a  poli>H$di surface, 
the  surface  portion  of  said  mold  being  formed  of&rr-ijan 
silver,  substantially  as  described.  i'/y/,* 


v,  A  record  tablet  Void  forced  entirely  of  German 

*/'#'?  \  /* 

silver.  Bubs t  ant  ial 1 y  as  described. 

S  '  i/W/3 

■5^  A  record  table V'molX  hiving  a  poliabad  surface 
ar.d  formed  entirely  c ^/German  e\lv'er,  "Substantially  as 
described.  ,  •  ,  .v 

^  -g^vdbuL  vV/l? 

'l5>^A  record  tablet  mold  having  a  surface  portion 
of  German  sllvSr^ontaining  at  least  eighteen  per  cent 

of  nickel,  substantialT-y^as^deseribed. 

A  record  tablet  mold  ha^tng^apol ished  surface, 
the  surface  portion  of  said  mold  being  forJted^ofGerman 
eilver  containing  at  least  eighteen  per  cent  of  ru&i  ^ 
substantially  as  described,  7/'/V/r 

3  v 

Tpg,  a  record  tablet  tnoldAform.6d  entirely  of 

'  °  ’jC  Tfh-rrT-l^  5^t i/ty/Sd 

silver  obntaining\t  least  eighteen  per  cent  c 


Geri 

nickel,  substantially 


3  described. 


V4.  a  record  tablet  mol d%a  v i n 

^containing  at  least 
eighteen  per  cent  of  nickel,  substantially  as  described. 

ig7~  A'reeord  tablet  mold  having  a  polished  surfaoe 
the  surfaoe  portion  of  Baid 


me tall io  substanoe  free  from  flaws  and  oontaining'niok? 


m,)\i  Specification  signet!  ant!  biitneSSeb  bap  of  19 1  z 

\ffvirUi'V<Z-^d  — 


u . A 


©atb. 


g-tate  of  JJeU)  fcrSep  ) 

Countp  of  (Essex  j 

TiioiiiAij  a.  edisoh  -  tlj e  aljobc  nmneb 
petitioner,  being  buly  stuoin,  beposcs  anb  saps  tljat  fje  is  a  citizen  of  tlje  fHnitcb 
states,  anb  a  resibent  Of  Llewellyn  Ptirlc,  V.’oot  Ornnco,  Emiex  County, 
How  Joroey, 


tfjat  Ije  berily  belicbcs  fjiniself  to  be  tfje  original,  first  anb  sole  inbentor  of  tlje 
improbements  in  eecoed  tablet  molds 


beScribeb  anb  clainteb  in  tlje  annexeb  specification ;  tljat  fje  boes  not  Unoto  anb 
boes  not  beliebe  tljat  tlje  Same  boas  eber  fmobm  or  useb  before  Ijis  inbention  or 
biscoberp  tljercof;  or  patenteb  or  beScribeb  in  anp  printeb  publication  in  tlje 
miniteb  States  of  America  or  anp  foreign  countrp  before  Ijis  inbention  or 
biscoberp  tijereof,  or  more  tfjan  ttoo  pears  prior  to  tijis  application;  or  patenteb 
in  anp  countrp  foreign  to  tlje  ®nitcb  states  on  an  application  fileb  more  tijan 
ttoelbe  months  prior  to  tijis  application;  or  in  public  use  or  on  Sale  in  tlje 
ftlniteb  States  for  more  tijan  ttuo  pears  prior  to  tijis  application;  anb  tljat  no 
application  for  patent  upon  saib  inbention  IjaS  been  fileb  bp  Ijitn  or  Ijis  legal 
representatibes  or  assigns  in  anp  foreign  countrp. 


gibiorn  to  anb  SubScribcb  before  me  tijis  tiff**  bap  of<^^  191  2 


ilotarp  public. 


[Seal] 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 
UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 


Thomaa  A.  Edison, 

o/c  Drank  L.  Dyer, 
Orange,  IT. 


•  Please,  fin.il  below  a  communication,  from  the  EXAHIHER  in  charge  of  your  ap plica 


for  RECORD  TABLET  U0LDI3,  filed  May  2,  1912,  #694,650, 


This  0033  has  been  examined. 

The  GLnimB  are  reject od  on 

Dunne,  #730,102,  .Tune  3,  1903  (1C  -  47), 

showing  a  nlokol  mold  facing,  *r 

UoDonald,  #366,176,  July  5,  1087  (eame), 


niokel  or  Oerman  silver. 


HI  THE  UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE. 


THOMAS  A.  EDISON,  ) 

HECOHD  TABLET  MOLDS,  ) 

Room  Ho.  a08. 

Filed  May  2,  1912,  ) 

Serial  Ho.  694,658.  ) 

HONORABLE  COMMISSIONER  OF  PATENTS, 

S  I  R: 

In  response  to  tho  Office  action  of  July  15, 
1912,  please  amend  the  above  entitled  case  as  follows: 

In  line  19,  page  1,  after  "the"  insert 
-  subsequent  -  . 

In  line  1,  claim  9,  after  "mold"  insert  -  or 
transfer  plato  -  ;  and  in  line  2,  same  claim,  after 
"Bilver"  insert  -  free  from  flaws  -  . 

In  line  1,  claim  10,  after  "mold"  insert 
_  or  transfer  plate  -  ;  and  in  line  2,  same  claim,  after 
"silver"  insert  -  free  from  flaws  -  . 


In  line  1,  claim  13,  after  "mold"  in3ort 
_  or  transfer  plate  -  ;  and  in  line  2,  same  claim,  after 
"silver"  insert  -  free  from  flaws  and  -  . 

In  line  1,  claim  14,  after  "mold"  insert 
_  or  transfer  plate  -  ;  and  in  line  2,  same  claim, 
after  "silver"  insert  -  free  from  flaws  and  -  . 

Cancel  claims  1  to  8  inclusive,  11,  12,  15 
and  16,  and  change  the  numerals  of  claims  9,  10,  13  and 
14  to  1  to  4, respectively. 

Add  the  following  claim: 


5,  a  record  tab\t  mold  or  transfer  plate  having 
polished  surface  and  a  flWed  periphery  and  formed  entire^ 
of  German  silver  free  from  flwvs,  substantially  as 
described.  -  \ 


REMARKS 


Tha  references  cited  by  the  Examiner  have  hoen 
carefully  considered  hy  the  applicant,  and  the  claims 
have  been  revised  to  point  out  more  clearly  the  patehtahle 
features  of  applicant's  invention. 

neither  of  the  references  discloses  a  record 
tablet  mold  or  transfer  plate  formed  entirely  of  German 
silver  free  from  flaws.  In  tho  process  for  which  appli¬ 
cant's  invention  is  more  particularly  designed,  the 
record  composition  is  applied  in  fluid  form  to  the  surface 
of  the  transfer  plate.  In  order  to  eliminate  tho  tendency 
of  the  said  composition  to  adhere  to  the  transfer  plate 
aftor  hardening,  it  is  necessary  that  the  suid  plate  bo 
formed  of  a  material  free  from  flaws,  and  capable  of  receiv¬ 
ing  a  high  polish.  The  transfer  plate  should  alBO  be 
capable  of  being  repolished;  and,  as  a  thin  surface  coating 
or  layer,  such  as  described  by  Dunne,  would  soon  be  ground 
aWay  in  repolishing,  the  transfer  plate  should  bo  homogeneous 
or  formod  entirely  of  the  same  material.  Applicant  has 
found  that  German  silver  is  the  only  substance  which  can 
*a  obtained  free  from  flaws  and  with  the  other  necessary 
qualities  at  a  sufficiently  low  price  to  permit  the  commerc  .- 
al  use  of  transfer  plates  formod  entirely  thereof. 

Claims  3  nnd  4  specify  that  the  German  silver 
contains  at  least  13$  of  nickel. 

Claim  5,  in  addition  to  stating  that  the  mold 
or  transfer  plate  has  a  polished  surface  and  is  formed 
entirely  of  German  silver  free  from  flaws,  differentiates 
from  the  references  by  stating  that  the  mold  or  transfer 
plate  has  a  flanged  periphery. 

2 


and  ircvprovo  d 


I  The  applicant  haB  invented 

article  of  manufacture,  and  reconsideration  and  allowance 
•  aro  accordingly  respectfully  requested. 

Respectfully  submitted , 

THOMAS  A.  EDI  SOU, 

bv  ‘  ' 

ij  -  his  Attorney.  ' 

Orange,  Hew  Jersey, 

June  ]*J<  1913. 

i'B-KGK 


Responsive  to  amendment  filed  June  10,  1913. 

Claims  1  to  4  inoluoivo  ore  rejected  on  the  references. of 
record.  UoDCnald  for  instance  notes  explicitly  the  utility  of  gonaan 
silver  us  faoing  muterial  for  mold  structure. 

Claim  5  is  rejeoted/on 

Hiokerson  #285, fo?  Sept.  18,  1883  (18-47)  whioh  shows  a 
mold  with  polished  surfuoo  and  flanged  periphery.  Whether  the  surface 
layer  be  of  nickel  o*  german  silver  is  immaterial  as  affects  patent¬ 
ability.  Both  equivalents  are  Bhoim  in  the  art  of  record.  See  e.  g. 


•UoDonuld. 


E  UNITED  STATES  PAT  BUT  OFFICE. 


Room  Ho.  308 


IN  a 

I  THOMAS  A.  EDISON,  } 
RECORD  TABLET  MOLDS,  ) 
Filed  May  2,  1912,  ) 

Serial  Ho.  694,668.  ) 


| HONORABLE  COMMISSIONER  OF  PATENTS, 

R: 

In  response  to  the  Offioe  aotion  of 

I  August  11,  1913,  please  amend  the  above  entitled  oase  as 
follows: 

At  the  end  of  line  12,  page  6,  insert  the 
| following  sentence: 


The  mold  surfaoes  of  the  plates  1  end  1* , 
shown,  are  smooth  and  even  from  the  center  of  the  plates 
[to  their  peripheries,  so  that  there  is  no  danger  of  the 
record  material  adhering  to  the  mold  surfaces  -  . _ . 


Rewrite  the  olaimB  as  follows: 


A  record  tablet  moia  or  transfer  plate  oonsisting 


jof  a  flat  plate  of  German  silver  free  : 


ui  from  flaws  and  having  a! 

I  highly  polished  3^‘moldlr«^^ 
the  entire  face-e£^^\ie*e . 'substantially  as  described. 

A  record  tablet  mold  or  transfer  plate  consisting 
of  a  flat  plate  of  German  silver  free  from 
flanged  periphery  and  a  highly  polished  «*»-«bId  surface A 
extending  over  substantially  the  entire  face  thereof,  sub- 

Istant ially  as  described. 

3.  A  record  tablet  mold  nr  transfer  plate  oonsisting 
of  a  flat  plate  of  German  Bilver  free  from., flaw  and  con¬ 
taining  at  least  18%  of  nickel,  said  plate  having  a  highly 
polished  molT’surfao^xt ending 'over  substantially 


the  entire  faoe  thereof,  substantially  as  described. 


REMARKS 

It  is  thought  that  the  references  do  not  antioi- 
pate  applicant’s  invention,  but  the  claims  have  been  re¬ 
written  to  more  clearly  define  the  invention.  Applicant's 
problan  as  fully  set  forth  in  the  specification  is  thought 
not  to  be  contemplated  in  the  references;  and  the  features 
of  the  invention  which  adapt  the  some  particularly  for  the 
eolution  of  said  problem  are  thought  now  to  bo  brought  out 
in  the  claims.  All  of  the  latter  now  specify  a  flat  plate 
of  German  silver  free  from  flaws  and  having  a  highly  golish- 
ed  even  mold  surface  extending  over  substantially  the 
entire  face  of  the  plate.  Claim  2  also  specifies  that  the 
plate  has  a  flanged  periphery,  and  claim  3  that  it  contains 
at  least  18#  of  nickel.  By  reason  of  these  limitations, 
the  claims  are  thought  to  be  clearly  patentable.  Referr¬ 
ing  to  the  patent  to  Biokeraon  cited  by  the  Examiner  in  the 
last  Office  action,  it  is  thought  that  a  thin  veneer  could 
not  be  readily  stripped  off  the  irregular  and  uneven  mold 
surface  shown  in  the  said  patent  without  such  injury  to  the 
molded  surface  of  the  veneer  as  would  be  fatal  to  the  sur¬ 
face  of  a  sound  record  tablet. 

It  is  thought  that  the  claims  are  patentable, 

II  and  reconsideration  and  allowance  are  accordingly  respect¬ 
fully  requested. 


Respectfully  submitted, 
THOMAS  A.  EDI SOB , 


I  Orange,  Hew  Jersey, 
July  /6't  1914. 


his  Attorney. 


Div. _ U5>  Room  ...30.8 

“The  CommWtlonor  of  Patent*, 
Waihlngton,  D.  C.,M 


cs? 


Mo. 


Paper  No . 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 


UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 

WASHINGTON  8opt.  3,  1914, 


...  .  Prank’  L.Zyex* . 

....  Qrnngo,...Hv  J. . 


IU.  a  PATENT  OFFICE, 
SEP  8  M4 

mailed. 


Please  find  below  a  communication  from  the  EXAMINER  in.  charge  of  the  application,  of 

,.ThiMMi8..>..JtUaan.....»ari« . for . 


.Ttthltt.6..JlIoitla» . 


Responsive  to  anondmont  filed  July  10,  1914. 

The  olniraa  are  raj  anted  for  want  of  invention  over  the 


references  of  reaord. 


IN  THE  UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 


j  ThomaB  A.  Edioon  j 

ij  RECORD  TABLET  HOLDS 

Room  No.  0O8. 

Ij  Filed  May  2,  1912 
j!  Serial  No.  694,668 

j  HONORABLE  COMMISSIONER  OF  PATENTS, 

|;  SIR: 

In  response  to  the  Office  action  of 

i  September  3,  1914,  please  amend  the  above  entitled  oase 
■j  as  follows:- 

Claim  1,  lino  3,  cancel  "oven",  and  after  "sur- 
j;  face"  inBort  -  free  from  projections  and  depressions  and  -  , 

ii  Line  4,  change  "of  said  plate"  to  -  thereof  -  • 

ii  Claim  2,  line  3,  oanoel  "even",  and  after  'sur- 

ij  face"  insert  -  free  from  projections  and  depressions  and  -  . 

Ij  Claim  3,  line  4,  cancel  "even",  and  after  "sur- 

i  face"  insert  -  free  from  projections  and  depressions  and  . 

p  E  M  ARES 

:'i  claims  as  presented  are  thought  to  patentably 

j  distinguish  from  the  references.  Tho  patent  to  McDonald 
does  not  show  a  flat  plate  of  the  typo  specified  in  the 
!  claims.  The  patent  to  Niolcerson  does  not  disclose  a  plate 
j  made  of  Serman  silver,  nor  does  it  disclose  a  plate  freo 
!  from  projections  and  depressions,  as  specified  in  the  claims, 
'!  Ujo  patent  to  Dunn  does  not  disclose  a  plate  of  German  sll- 
!  ver  nor  does  it  disclose  a  plate  having  the  flanged  periph- 
j  ery  specified  in  claim  2. 


Reconsideration  and  allowance  are  requested. 
Respectfully  submitted, 

THOMAS  A. -EDISON 

Bv  4^/  ^ 

His  Attorney 


Orange ,  II .  J » 
July  /(4-  ,  1936 


F3-JS 


In  reopon3e  to. the  amendment  filed  July  15,  1915; 

The  claim:)  are  rejected  on  the  references  and  for  the 
is  of  record.  Ac  regardo  the  flanged  periphery  construe- 
it  will  bejioticod  that  thin  relationship  is  nhown  in  Kicke 


aon. 


Ill  THE  UNITED  STATE3  PATENT  OFFICE 


Thomas  A.  Edison 
RECORD  TABLET  HOLDS 
Filed  May  2,  1912 
Serial  Ho.  694,668 


HONORABLE  C omiSSIOIH®  OF  PATENTS , 

SIR: 

In  response  to  the  Offioe  nation  of 

August  10,  1916. 

The  referonoes  of  record  have  again  Been  oare- 
fnlly  considered,  ana  it  is  thought  that  tho  same  do  not 
anticipate  the  claims.  Tho  invention  is  a  very  special 
kina  of  device  which  is  not  aisolosea  in  the  prior  art, 
ana  it  is  thought  that  a  patent  should  not  he  withheld  upon 
the  same  merely  Because  of  its  simplicity.  None  of  the 
references  shows  a  device  intended  for  use  as  a  transfer 
plate  intended  to  reoeive  a  veneer  which  is  suBseauently 
welded  or  secured  to  a  Booking.  It  is  not  seen  how  the 
cylindrical  tube  D  of  Uaodonald  resembles  tho  flat  transfer 
plate  of  applicant.  The  patent  to  Dunne  does  not  show  a 
German  silver  transfer  plate  having  a  flanged  periphery. 

The  device  of  Nickerson  is  very  different  from  that  olaimod. 
Instead  of  Being  made  with  German  silver  it  is  made  with  a 
soft  Base  oovored  with  a  thin  ooating  of  niokel.  In  suoh 
a  device,  tho  niokel  would  peel  off  the  BaBe  and  render  the 
mold  entirely  unsuited  for  the  production  of  satisfactory 


sound  reoord  tablets.  Furthormora ,  the  die  of  Niokerson 
is  not  a  mold  surface  free  from  projections  and  depressions 
For  the  above  reasons,  reconsideration  and  allow¬ 
ance  are  roBpeotfully  requested. 

Respectfully  submitted, 

THOMAS  A,  EDISON 

By  $ycS' — 'r 

His  Attorney 

Oranpe,  II.  <1. 

July  3K  1916. 

FB-JS 


2-2C0 


Dlv.-ll)- 


H.  D.  R.  Ve. 

DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 


UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 

WASHINGTON  _ 


—EEiuik-L^..3s,'crr - 

_ Qraugc.r -  j  ,'lt"  \ 

_ Sammy. _  '  '  j 

Please  find,  below  a  communication  from  the  EXAMINER  in  charge  of  the  application  of 
Thr..,::, n  A.  ^dlaQn_....SerJ.^IIa^..A9/l.il5a^..TjLLo±..l!ay..P--,...1.9I.2^...n£ir.... 
...Hec/ird..Taihlni-.iInld.a. - 


Commiuioner  of  Patents,  fl 


for 


In  reuponae  to  the  letter  filed  Tuly 
Tho  claima  aro  finally  rejected  upon 
the  roaaona  of  record. 


as,  1916: 

tho  reference a  and 


IN  THE  UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 


Thomas  A.  Edison 
RECORD  TABLET  MOLDS 
Filed  May  2,  1912 
Serial  No.  694,658 

HONORABLE  COMMISSIONER  OF  PATENTS, 

SIR: 

I  he re By  constitute  ana  appoint  DYER  & 
HOLI25N  (Registration  No.  3244),  a  firm  composed  of  Frank  L. 
Dyer  and  Delos  Holden,  Vhose  adarese  is  Edison  Office  Build¬ 
ing,  Orange,  New  Jersey,  as  my  associates  in  the  prosecution 
of  the  above  entitled  application,  and  request  that  all 
correspondence  be  addressed  to  them  until  further  notioe. 

Respectfully, 

y 

Orange,  N.  J. 

January/^  ,  1917. 


)  iv-ci— <;  l&— «-^ 
3  ,'tf  VI 


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June  20,  1917 

Mr.  Edi son: 

Application  Serial  No.  694,658,  Piled  May  2,1912 
entitled  RECORD  TABLET  MOLDS. 

This  application  covers  the  polished  German  silver 
transfer  plates  formerly  used  Ly  us  in  the  manufacture  of  our 
disc  records.  The  application  has  been  finally  rejected,  and 
Mr.  Holden  and  X  think  that  it  should  be  dropped  because  the 
device  is  no  longer  used  by  us,  and  also  because  it  would 
probably  be  impossible  to  obtain  ShPclaims  on  same  from  the 
Patent  Office. 

Please  advise  if  you  wish 


Patent  Series 
Patent  Application  Files 

Folio  #  852  Electrical  System  for  Automobiles 

U.S.  Patent#:  1192400 

Primary  Applicant:  Edison,  Thomas  A 

Date  Executed:  5/20/1912 


lOf  !?/■*■ 


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Patent  Series 
Patent  Application  Files 

Folio#  853  Means  for  Concentrating  Ores 

U.S.  Patent#:  1167638 

Primary  Applicant:  Edison,  Thomas  A 

Date  Executed:  5/21/1912 


7^XP  <&y<2t. — ^  /A_ 


Patent  Series 


Folio#  861 
Serial  #: 

Primary  Applicant: 
Date  Executed: 


Patent  Application  Files 


Means  for  Charging  Storage  Batteries 
704338 

Langley,  Sam  G 
6/14/1912 


[PHOTOCOPY] 


■  Folio  No  i  &  r  , 


Applicant. 

1/0:  '^“^^7' 


/• “ 


^AssV-t^Exec.^U^/^-RccnicU  W/{A  Liber  2/, /V  Pa8c 

;|p.^:f,;.;-  '  ■  ACTIONS. 

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...  ...  5S#||v:X;iOjyT^y^^  ':' 


o 


petition 


tEo  tfje  Commissioner  of  patents: 

gour  petitioner  sah  o.  lahgley 

a  citizen  of  tije  ®niteb  States,  residing  anti  ijabing  a  $ost  (Office  abbreSS  at 

#102  Valley  Road,  V.'est  Orange,  Eoaex  County ,  New  Jersey 


praps  tfjat  letters  patent  map  be  granteb  to  ijim  for  tije  improbcments  in 

I.1EAIIS  SCR  CHARGING  STORAGE  BATTERIES 


Set  fort!)  in  tije  annexeb  specification;  anb  Ije  fjerebp  appoints  Jfranlt  TL.  ©per 
(Registration  &a.  560),  of  ©range,  3?eto  ferSep,  Ijis  attornep,  toitlj  fnU 
potoer  of  substitution  anb  rebocation,  to  prosecute  tljis  application,  to  mafee 
alterations  anb  amenbments  therein,  to  receibe  tije  patent,  anb  to  transact  all 
business  in  tije  patent  (Office  connected  tljereboitij. 


o 


SPECIFICATION 


I  TO  ALL  WHOM  IT  HAY  CONCERN:  ' 

| 

BE  IT  KNOWN,  that  I,  SAM  G.  LANGLEY,  a  oitizen 
.  of  the  Unitea  States,  and  a  resident  of  West  Orange,  in  the 
County  of  Essex  ana  State  of  Hew  Jersey,  hove  invented  oer- 
;  tain  new  ana  useful  improvements  in  MEANS  FOR  CHARGING  j 

'I  STORAGE  BATTERIES,  of  which  the  following  is  a  description: - 

:  J,iy  invention  relates  generally  to  means  for  oharg-j 

|  ing  storage  batteries,  and  particularly  to  apparatus  and  a  | 

'  |  system  for  charging  such  batteries  in  which  one  or  more  , 

I;  rectifying  devioes  are  employed  to  convert  alternating  cur- 
j!  re„t  into  uni -directional  current  which  is  supplied  to  the 
■j  battery  to  oharge  the  same.  In  a  system  of  this  oharsio- 
|  ter  it  is  desirable  to  provide  moans  for  preventing  dis- 
|  charge  of  the  storage  battery  through  the  rectifying  devices 
j  or  other  parts  of  the  system  in  ease  of  failure  of  current 
Ij  supply  from  the  source  or  in  case  of  abnormal  decrease  in 
J  voltage  of  the  same.  I  One  of  the  objects  of  my  invention 
/  Ij  iB  the  provision  of  an  automatic  switch  constituting  simple 
' J' j  and  efficient  means  for  this  purpose.!  Another  object  of  j 
E  ny  invention  is  the  provision  of  apparatus  constituting  a  j 
j  oomplete  charging  set  capable  of  being  compactly  assembled 
j  and  mounted,  and  adapted  to  be  connected  to  a  suitable  sourcE 
of  alternating  current  and  to  a  storage  battery  for  charging 
!  the  same.  My  invention  includes  also  the  combinations  of 
■I  elements  and  details  of  oonstruotion  more  fully  described 
|  hereinafter  and  olaimed. 

\  (D 


!  For  the  further  description  of  my  invention, 

j  roferenoe  is  had  to  the  drawings  accompanying  and  forming 
part  of  this  speoifioation,  and  in  whioh  - 

Figure  1  is  a  partly  diagrammatic  view  of  a  oharg" 
ing  system  including  a  complete  oharging  set  embodying  my 
invention  oonneoted  to  a  source  of  alternating  current  and 
to  a  storage  battery; 

Figure  2  is  a  vertioal  section  of  a  simplified 
i  form  of  a  rectifying  device  whioh  I  prefer  to  employ  in  my  j 
j!  improved  system; 

jj  Figure  3  is  a  side  elevation  of  my  improved  auto- 

f  matio  switoh,  with  the  oontaots  closed; 

J  Figure  4  is  a  plan  viev/  of  the  same  ,  with  the  oon- 

I  tacts  open; 

Figure  5  is  a  vertioal  view  at  right  angles  to 
the  view  of  Figure ,  3,’;  \the  upper  portion  being  seotional 
and  the  lower  portion  in  elevation;)  and 

Figure  6  is  a  horizontal  seotion  on  the  line  6-6 
of  Figure  5. 

My  improved  automatic  switoh  is  illustrated  in 
|  Figs.  3  to  6  inclusive.  1  Referring  particularly  to  these 
figures,  at  10  is  shown  a  supporting  member  which  may  be 

I'  made  of  a  single  piece  of  sheet  metal  find  whioh  has  a  hori¬ 
zontal  portion  11,  portions  12  and  13  extending  vertically 
upwards, (and  a  horizontal  portion  14  extending  outwardly 
from  the  upper  end' of  the  vertioal  portion  13.'  The  sup¬ 
porting  member  10  supports  the  parts  of  my  improved  auto- 
matio  switoh  and  may  be  seoured  to  any  suitable  base  member 
||  15.  If  the  base  member  15  is  of  conducting  material',  the 


(2) 


ji  supporting  member  10  is  preferably  insulated  therefrom,  but  ; 
jj  if  the  base  member  15  is  of  insulating  material,  further  in- 
|:  aulating  means  are  not  neoossary  in  securing  the  supporting 

il 

i|  member  10  to  the  base  member  15,  j  On  the  horizontal  por- 
!  tion  14  of  the  supporting  member  10  a  solenoid  is  mounted, 

I  whioh  inoludoB  a  vertically  disposed  hollow  spool  16  whioh 
J  may  bo  mode  of  metal  and  is  preferably  non-msgnetio ,  and 
!|  whioh  is  seoured  to  the  portion  14  in  any  suitable  manner, 
aa  for  example,  by  soldering.  The  spool  16  is  provided 
|  with  a  high  resistance  solenoid  winding  17  suitably  insulat . 
j  ed  from  the  spool.  In  the  hollow  oore  of  the  spool  a  plung 
!j  er  is  provided,  the  lower  portion  18  of  whioh  oonsists  of 
I  magnetio  material  and  is  preferably  of  soft  iron,  and  the 
ii  upper  portion  19  of  whioh  oonsists  of  non-magnetio  mster- 
•  J  ial,  suoh  as  brass  or  copper,  preferably  hollowed  out  to 
jj  reduo e  its  weight.  The  upper  non-magnetio  portion  of  the 
i!  plunger  is  provided  with  a  shoulder  20  or  other  suitable 
|  means  for  limiting  the  downward  movement  of  the  plunger, 
j|  and  also  with  a  vertioal  slot  22  through  whioh  passes  a 
ji  pin  21  soldered  or  seoured  in  any  other  suitable  manner  to 
)  the  top  of  the  spool  1(5  and  serving  to  limit  the  upward  j 
j!  movement  of  the  plunger.  In  the  operation  of  the  device, 
j:  the  pin  21  permits  the  plunger  to  rise  to  a  position  whioh 
i  ia  substantially  its  position  of  equilibrium  for  the  normal 
|  strength  of  ourrent  carried  by  the  ooil  17.  By  having  the 
lower  portion  of  the  plunger  of  soft  iron  and  the  upper 
j  portion  of  hollow  non-magnetio  material,  the  entire  plunger 
jj  is  elevntod  to  the  desired  position  in  the  solenoid  without 
|  necessitating  tho  use  of  Buoh  an  amount  of  iron  as  woiild 


(3) 


jj  render  the  plunger  unduly  heavy,  and  greater  sensitiveness 
jj  of  operation  is  thereby  attained.  The  lower  end  of  the 
;!  plunger  is  provided  with  a  pieoe  of  insulating  material  25 

I  secured  thereto  to  prevent  the  plunger  from  ooming  into 

|  elootrioal  oontaot  with. the  metallic  member  56  upon  which 
|!  it  impinges  when  it  moves  into  lowered  position. 

On  the  upwardly  extending  vertical  portion  13  of 
!|  tho  supporting  member  10  (and  beneath  the  portion  14^  hori- 
!j  zontal  eleotro -magnets  are  mounted,  the  said  eleotro- 
|  magnets  comprising  magnetio  oores  24  and  25,  one  end  of  each 
||  oore  being  secured  to  the  portion  13  in  any  suitable  manner, 
ji  as  for  example,  by  sorews,  the  oore  24  having  a  winding  26 
jj  surrounding  it  and  insulated  therefrom,  end  the  a  ore  25 
j!  having  a  winding  27  surrounding  it  and  insulated  therefrom. 
i|  she  ends  of  the  oores  24  and  25  which  are  farthost  from  the 
j  portion  13  are  provided  with  projecting  pins  of  non-m'agnetic 
i!  material  constituting  guides  for  an  armature  30  of  soft  iror 
||  v/hioh  is  elongated  in  form  and  has  openings  near  its  ends 
jj  to  reoeive  the  guides  28  and  29.  The  armature  30  is  pro- 

II  vidod  with  a  member  31  preferably  of  non-magnetio  material 
jj  secured  at  right  angloB  thereto  and  extending  horizontally 
j;  through  an  opening  32  in  the  upright  portion  13,  the  said 

f  upright  portion  13  thereby  constituting  a  guide  for  the 
jj  member  31.  On  the  portion  of  the  member  31  whioh  extends 
jj  through  the  upright  portion  13  collar  33_  or  other  Buit- 

Iablo  means  iB  provided  for  limiting  the  movement  of  the 
armature  3JD  away  from  the  oores  24  and  Z5.  si60'''1'0" 

|  magnets. 

j 

s 


(4) 


••  j 

I1 

j 

j! 

•j 

i 


\ 

i 

i 

I: 

ii 

.  j 

j 

'll 


On  the  upwardly  extending  portion  12  of  the  sup¬ 
porting  member  10  a  oontaot  34  is  mounted  and  suitably  in¬ 
sulated  therefrom.  The  oontaot  surfaoe  of  this  oontaot 
faoes  tho  end  of  tho  member  31  whioh  extends  through  the 
opening  32  on  the  upwardly  extending  vertical  portion  13. 

The  oontaot  34  is  preferably  a  metallio  disc  or  block  and  , 
is  provided  with  a  reduoed  portion  57  extending  through  an  v 
openine  in  the  upright  portion  12,  and  with  a  threaded  stem 
97.  The  threaded  stem  is  provided  with  a  nut  35  whioh  oo-' 
operates  with  the  diso  or  blook  34  and  with  insulating 
washers  to  hold  the  oontaot  in  plaoe  on  its  support,  and 
with  washers  36  and  a  nut  35'  whioh  afford  means  for  oon- 
nooting  tho  .terminal)  34  in  the  (battery yoirouit .  On 

the  upright  portion  12  is  also  mounted  a  spring  oontaot  57 
whioh  oonsists  of  an  elongated  portion  and  end  portions 
39  and  38  bent  baok  approximately  parallel  to  the  elongat¬ 
ed  portion  when  the  oontaot  is  in  closed  position.  The 
portion  38  of  the  spring  oontaot  37  is  seoured  to  the  up¬ 
wardly  extending  vertioal  portion  12  by  any  suitable  means 
as  for  example,  a  bolt  and  nut  40.  At  the  end  of  the  por- 
tion  3E[  on  inturned  projection  42  is  provided  whioh  oq- 
operates  with  a  slot  41  in  the  upright  portion  12  to  pos¬ 
ition  the  oontaot  against  rotary  displacement  around  the 
bolt  40.  The  head  of  the  bolt  40  oo-operates  with  a 
washer  to  oonneot  the  oontaot  in  oirouit.  Tho  ena  6f  the 
portion  39.  of  the  spring  oontaot  37  iB  split  into  a  plural 
ity  of  parts  whioh  oonstitute  oontaot  faoes  oo-operating 
with  the  oontaot  34,  and  insure  adequate  oontaot  therewith 


(5) 


!  on  aooount  of  the  resiliency  of  the  spring  oontaot  37,  ) 

the  portions  38  and  59  tend  to  spring  out  of  parallelism  , 
with  the  elongated  portion  of  the  spring,  whereby  the  j 

portion  39  (his  moved'/  away  from  the  oontaot  34  as  is  illus- 
traded  in  Fig.  4.  V.lien ,  howover,  the  v/indingo  26  and  27 
1  are  energised,  the  armature  30  is  attracted  towards  the 
ji  cores  24  and  25,  and  the  oontaots  37  and  34  are  forced  into 
|  olosed  position  by  tho  and  of  the  member  31.  It  is-  to  be 
j  observed  that  the  entire  length  of  the  spring  oontaot  37, 

|  including  the  bent  baok  portion  39,  is  effective  in  exert - 
j|  ing  pressure  against  tho  actuating  member  31,  and  that,  on 
|  aooount  of  the  shape  of  the  spring,  this  pressure  is  great 
f  when  the  armature  30  is  in  contact  with  or  nearest  tho 
|  oores  24  and  25.  i'he  bent  baofc  portion  39_  contributes 
I)  materially  to  foroing  tho  armature  30  away  fro#  the  oores, 

'  |j  whioh  effectually  overcomes  any  tendonoy  of  the  armature 
jl  to  stiol:  to  the  oores. 

!l  43  | 

j|  A  plate  of  insulating  material /Has  one  end 

J  seoured  to  the  under  side  of  the  horizontal  portion  14  and 

.j 

j|  serves  as  a  support  at  its  other  end  for  a  hollow  tube  44, 

!|  which  is  made  of  motal,  as  for  example,  brass,  ana  whioh  is 
]  screw  threaded  at  its  lower  end  into  tho  insulating  plate 
!!  43.  At  the  upper  end  of  the  tube  44  a  plug  47  of  insulat-  j; 

5  ing  material  is  inserted,  through  whioh  extends  b.  oonduoting  j 

ij  1 

ji  member  46  sorew  threaded  at  its  upper  end  and  provided  with  i 
'  il  a  oontaot  45  at  its  lower  end.  fhe  upper  end  of  the  member  \ 
ji  46  is  provided  with,  nuts  48  end  49  and  waBhers  50  jvhioh  serve 
j|  to  oonneot  a  conduct  or^in  cirouit  ,i- the  nut  49  serving  also 


(6) 


Ij 


j!  to  secure  the  member  46  in  the  insulating  plug  by  oo-opera-  |' 

,|j  tion  with  a  headed  portion  at  the  other  end  of  the  said 

l! 

I!  member  46.  In  the  lower  portion  of  the  tube  44  and  ex- 
j!  tending  through  the  bottom  thereof  and  through  the  insulat- 
|j  ing  plate  43  is  an  elongated  member  52  provided  at  itB  up- 

|  per  end  with  a  oontaot  51  and  sorew  threaded  at  its  lower 

!; 

l!  end .  A  ooiled  spring  59  enoiroles  the  member  52  within 

!  the  hollow  oylinder  and  is  located  between  a  shoulder  on 
the  upper  portion  of  the  member  52  and  a  shoulder  in  the 
ji  lower  portion  of  the  tube  44,  thereby  tending  to  elevate 
ij  the  member  J52  and  to  foroe  oontaot  51  into  oontaot  with  the 
j  oontaot  45.  A  braoket  54  is  held  in  plaoe  on  the  insulat- 
;  ing  plate  43  by  the  oylinder  44,  the  lower  end  of  the  oylind- 
!  er  being  extended  through  a  portion  of  the  braoket  lying  on  j 
|  the  upper  surface  of  the  insulating  plate  43.  The  braok- 
||  et  54  is  insulated  from  the  horizontal  supporting  portion 
||  14  by  the  insulating  plate  43.  The  braoket  54  is  provided 
||  with  lugs  55,  upon  whioh  an  elongated  member  56  of  light 
||  weight,  whioh  may  be  made  of  fairly  stiff  sheet  metal,  is 
|  pivotally  supported.  The  member  66  has  an  opening  through 
whioh  the  lower  end  of  the  member  j52  passes  loosely,  and  nuts 
53  are  provided  at  the  lower  end  of  the  member  52  and  beneath 
the  elongated  member  56  in  suoh  a  manner  that  the  Rlongatod 
member  56  is  supported  in  an  approximately  horizontal  posi¬ 
tion  and  its  free  end  is  looated  immediately  beneath  the  in¬ 
sulating  blook  23  of  the  plunger  18.  :Upon  failure  of  our.- 
rent  or  abnormal  deoreaBe  in  ourrent  strength  of  the  ooil  1^, 
|!  tho  plunger  18  drops  by  gravity  and  impinges  upon  the  free 

1  , 

l| 


(V) 


ena  of  the  pivoted  member  56,  thereby  depressing  the  member 
52  against  the  action  of  the  spring  59  and  separating  the 
oontaots  45  and  51.-  The  braoket  54  is  provided  with  a 
sorew  ana  washer  58  for  oonneoting.  the  braoket;  in  oirouit. 
It  will  be  observed  that  the  braoket  '^jfiV’in  elootrioal 
oonneotion  with  the  tube  44  and  the  oontaot  51. 

In  Figure  1,  in  whioh  a  oomplete  charging  set 
embodying  my  invention  is  illustrated,  72  and  73  are  ter¬ 
minals  adapted  to  be  oonneoted  to  alternating  ourrent  mains 
TO  ana  71  respectively  whioh  are  supplied  with  alternating 
ourrent  from  any  suitable  souroe.  Terminals  84  ana  85 
are  provided,  whioh  are  adapted  to  be  oonneotea  1;o  a  stor¬ 
age  battery  and  are  shown  oonneoted  to  the  storage  battery 


ij  86.  At  74  and  75  respectively  are  shown  the  primary  and 
j|  secondary  of  a  transformer,  suitably  designed  to  trans- 
|  form  the  ourrent  from  the  souroe  70  ana  71  to  a  voltage 
i|  suitable  for  oharging  the  storage  battery.  The  terminal 
;  72  is  oonneotea  to  a  junotion  point  76,  to  whioh  one  ter- 
| minal  of  tha  primary  winding  74  is  oonneoted.  The  other 

| terminal  of  the  primary  winding  is  oonneoted  to  one  termin- 
jal  of  an  adjustable  rheostat  78,  the  other  terminal  of  the 
||  rheostat  being  oonneoted  to  a  junotion  point  77.  The 
■<  junotion  point  77  is  oonneoted  to  a  oontaot  79  of  a  double 
■{polo  manually  operated  switoh  82,  whioh  is  provided  with  a 
|| oontaot  80  adapted  to  be  oonneoted  to  the  oontaot  79  by  the 
|switoh  blade  81  and  with  oontaots  87  and  88  adapted  to  be 
jjoonneoted  together  by  the  switoh  blade  39.  Switoh  blades 
lj§l  ana  §2.  aro  provided  with  a  oommon  handle  for  opening 
[and  olosing  the  switoh.  The  switoh  oontaot  80  is  oon- 


(8) 


neoted  to  the  terminal  73.  When  the  ewitoh  82  is  olosea, 
the  primary  of  the  transformer  is  oonneoted  aoross  the 
alternating  ourrent  mains  70.  and  71  through  the  switoh  bladu 
81  and  the  adjustable  rheostat  78.  A  suitable  rectifying 
devioe  or  devioes  are  provided.  I  have  illustrated  four 
suoh  devioes  A,  B,  C  and  D,  which  are  preferably  of  the 
type  of  reotifying  devioes  described  and  olaimed  in  my 
application  Serial  Bo.  702,187,  filed  June  7,  1912.  Baoh  j 
of  these  reotifying  devioes  includes  a  permanent  magnet  60 
having  an  almost  closed  magnetic  circuit.  In  the  gap  of 
the  magnetio  oirouit  of  the  permanent  magnet  60  one  or  more 
soft  iron  armatures  61  and  62  are  pivotally  mounted  at  their 
lower  ends  on  the  permanent  magnet  or  on  a  suitable  frame 
which  may  also  be  used  for  supporting  the  magnet.  Arma¬ 
tures  61  and  62  are  provided  at  their  upper  ends  with  suit¬ 
able  oontaots  63  and  64  respectively  which  are  preferably  oi: 
oarbon.  She  vibrating  oontaots  63  and  64  oo-operate  with 
the  stationary  oontaot  65.  Surrounding  the  armatures  61 
and  62  is  on  actuating  coil  66.  When  the  actuating  coil 
is  supplied  with  alternating  ourrent  an  alternating  magnetic 
flux  is  set  up  in  the  soft  iron  armatures  61  and  62,  mating 
of  their  upper  ends  alternately  north  and  south  poles.  When 
the  iipper  ends  of  the  armatures  are  north  poles,  the  south 
pole  of  the  permanent  magnet  is  strengthened  and  the  north 
pole  is  weakened ,  and  vice  versa.  The  armatures  are  there¬ 
fore  vibrated  in  synchronism  with  the  alternating  ourrent 
in  the  actuating  ooil  and  open  and  dose  a  oirouit  con¬ 
taining  the  stationary  oontaot  65  and  the  vibrating  oon¬ 
taots  63  and  64.  The  vibrating  oontaots  63  and  64  are 


(9) 


jj  oonneoted  together  through  the  armaturee  and  their  support  - 
I  ing  meanB,  inoluding  the  permanent  magnet  or  the  frame. 

I  In  the  system  illustrated,  the  actuating  ooils  of  the  de- 
jj  vioes  A,  B,  £  and  D  are  connected  in  series  by  a  conductor 
||  extending  from  the  junotion  point  7£  through  a  condenser  83 
ji  to  the  junotion  point  77.  The  actuating  ooils  are  there- 
|j  fore  oonneoted  in  sories  across  the  terminals  72  and  75 
|  and  across  the  alternating  current  mains  7£  and  7£  when 
IS  the  terminals  72  and  73  are  oonneoted  to  the  mains.  The 
jj  oondonser  85  is  adjusted  so  as  to  advanoe  the  phase  of  the  ] 
ij  ourrent  in  the  actuating  ooils  to  a  sufficient  extent  to 
ji  oomponsate  for  the  induotanoe  of  the  ooils  and  for  the  in- 
j;  ertia  of  the  armatures,  and  to  insure  the  making  and  breaking 
j;  of  the  rectifying  oirouits  at  the  proper  times  to  reduce  or 
|  substantially  prevent  sparking.  One  terminal  of  the 

jj  secondary  75  is  oonneoted  by  conductor  90  to  the  terminal 
84  which  is  oonneoted  to  the  storage  battery  86,  and  the 
Ij  other  terminal  of  the  secondary  75  is  connected  by  a  oon- 
|  duotor  67  to  the  spring  oontaot  37  of  the  automatio  ov/itoh. 
ji  The  fixed  oontaot  34  of  the  automatio  BWitoh  is  oonneoted 
jj  by  conductor  93  to  the  armatures  and  vibrating  oontaots 
:i  of  two  of  the  rectifying  devices,  as  for  example,  the 
||  devioes  A  and  £.  The  fixed  oontaots  of  the  rectifying 
jj  devioes  A  and  £  are  oonneoted  to  the  vibrating  oontaots  and 
jj  armatures  of  devioes  B  and  D  by  oonduotorB  68  and  69  ro¬ 
ll  speotively.  The  fixed  oontaots  of  the  devioes  B  and  £  are 
ij  oonneoted  together  and  to  the  oontaot  88  of  the  manually 
jj  operated  s  wit  oh  82  by  means  of  oonduotor  92.  The  oontaot 


(10) 


87  of  the  manually  operated  switoh  02  is  connected  to  the 
terminal  05^  by  oonduotor  91,  the  terminal  05  being  connect¬ 
ed  to  the  storage  battery  06.  The  winding  17  of  the  solen¬ 
oid  is  oonneoted  between  the  junotion  points  7j6  and  77  and 
is  therefore  oonneoted  aoross  the  terminals  72  and  73_  and  - 
alternating  our rent  mains. 70  and  71  oonneoted  thereto  through 
switoh  blade  81  of  manually  oporated  switch  82.  The  eleo- 
tro-iaagnet  windings  26  and  27  are  oonneoted  in  series  aorosu 
the  battery  terminals  and  in  series  with  oontaots  45  and  51, 
the  oirouit  being  as  follows:-  i’rom  terminal  84  through 
oonduotor  94  to  magnet  winding  27,  through  magnet  winding 
26,  oonduotor  95,  bracket  54,  cylinder  44,  oontaot  51,  oon¬ 
taot  45,  oonduotor  96,  the  oonduotor  96  being  in  electrical 
oonnootion  with  the  fixed  oontaots  of  reotifying  devloes  J3 
and  B,  whioh  oontaots  are  in  eleotrioal  oonneotion  with 
terminal  85  through  oonduotor  92,  switoh  oontaot  88,  switoh 
blade  89,  switoh  oontaot  87  and  oonduotor  91. 

The  operation  of  the  system  is  as  follows :- 
V/hen  the  terminals  72  and  73  are  oonneoted  to  mains  70  and 
71  supplied  with  alternating  oixrrent  and  the  switoh  82  is 
olosed,  the  solenoid  winding  17  is  energised,  the  core  18  | 

is  elevated  into  its.  upper  position,  and  the  oontaots  45  I 

and  51  are  permitted  to  olose.  The  magnet  windings  26  and  ! 
—  ,  / 

27  are  then  energized  'from  the  storage  battery by  reofc-i- 

#4ed-  gurront  oupplled  from  tho  reetifylng  sys-te^,  the  arma¬ 
ture  30  is  attracted  to  the  oores  24  and  25,  oontaots  37 
and  34  are  olosed  by  the  aotion  of  the  member  31  secured  to 
the  armature  .30,  and  the 'battery  iB  oonneoted  in’ oirouit 
with  the  reotifying  system.  (The  armatures  of  the  reotify- 


(11) 


ing  devioes  are  vibrated  In  synchronism  with  the  alternating 
ourrent  to  be  rootified,  and  the  oontaots  of  eaoh  devioe  are 
closed  during  alternate  half  waves  of  alternating  current 
!  and  opened  during  the  remaining  half  waves.  5?he  path  of 
the  rectified  ourrent  is  as  follows:-  Starting  at  the  left 
!  hand  end  of  the  secondary  75,  through  conductor  90 .  to 
i  terminal  84,  'through  storage  battery  86  to  terminal  85, 

!  through  conductor  91,  switoh  oontaot  87,  switoh  blade  89, 
ji  BT/itoh  oontaot  88,  oonduotor  92,  to  the  fixed  oontaots  of 

|  rectifying  devioos  B  and  D.  At  this  point  the  current 

ji  j 

|j  divides,  one  path  being  through  oontaots  and  armatures  of  j 

!|  reotifying  devioe  B,  through  oonduotor  68  to  oontaots  and 
*!  armatures  of  reotifying  devioe  A,  and  to  oonduotor  95 ; 

!j  the  other  path  being  through  oontaots  and  armatures  of 
j!  reotifying  devioe  B,  oonduotor  69,  oontaots  and  armatures 
jj  of  reotifying  devioe  £,  to  oonduotor  93,  and  uniting  with 
jj  the  other  branoh  of  the  oirquit,  andthenoe  through  oonduot- 
I  or  93  to  fixed  automatic  switoh  oontaot  34,  spring  oontaot 
!  37,  oonduotor  67,  and  back  to  the  right  hand  end  of  the 
i  seoondary  75  of  the  transformer.  In  this  manner  uni¬ 
directional  ourrent  is  supplied  to  the  battery  to  oharge 
the  same,  and  the  strength  of  the  charging  ourrent  may  be 
regulated  by  the  adjustable  rheostat  78  in  oirouit  with  the 
;  primary  74  of  the  transformer.  A  If  for  any  oause  there  is 
a  failure  of  the  ourrent  supplied  to  the  alternating  our- 
!  rent  mains,  or  if  the  voltage  drops  abnormally,  for  example, 
to  suoh  an  extent  as  to  reduo, e  the  voltage  of  the  charging 
ourrent  below  the  battery  voltage,  the  plunger  of  the  sol- 
enoid  will  be  permitted  to  drop,  impinging  upon  the  member 


s 


jj  (  56 ,  end  separating  oontaot  51  from  oontaot  45  ugainst  the  f/ 

Ij  aotion  of  the  spring  59,  the  tension  of  the  spring  59  and  ,j 
||  weights  of  the  member  5£  and  the  plungor  of  the  solenoid  1 
||  being  properly  proportioned  to  produoe  this  result.  The 
j|  separation  of  oontaots  51  and  45  oauses)„t'he  oirouit  throughj  1 
|  the  magnet  windings  E6  and  27  fto  be  broken ,  i  and)  the  resil- 
|- 

|  ionoy  of  the  spring  oontaot  37  forces  the  armature  30  away 
|  from  its  oore  and  separates  oontaot  37  from  oontaot  34, 

|  thereby  breaking  the  oirouit  (botween  the  battery  and  the  1 
jj  reotifying  devioes,  and  preventing  any  possible  disoharge 
||  from  the  battery  through  the  reotifying  devioes.)  V/hen 
!;  current  oomos  on  again  in  (tho.  mains  70  ai)d  7l)  or  the  volt- 

il 

;  age  rises  to  the  required  amount,  the  solenoid  winding  17 
jj  (iD  immediately  energized^  the  oore  18  elevated  out  of  oon¬ 
taot  with  the  member  56,  .permitting  tho  olosing  of  the  oon- 
tabts  51  and  45,  thereby  olosing, the  oirouit  through  the,  1 
magnot  windings  ,26  and  27 .  -.which  causes)  tho  cores  24  and 
25  to  attraot  tho  armature  30  and  thereby  olo.se  oontaot  37 
against  oontaot  34,  thus  re-establishing  tho (connection  be¬ 
tween  the  reotifying  devioes  and  the  storage  battery.  Ob¬ 
viously,  opening  the  hand  operated  switch  82  do-energizes 
the  solenoid  winding  17  and  oauses  the  battery  oirouit  to 
j  be  opened  at  oontaots  37  and  34.  Furthermore,  when  the 
•  hand  operated  sv/itoh  82  is  opened,  there  is  no  sparking  at 
the  oontaots  of  the  automatio  switch  beoause  the  oirouits 
aro  broken  first  at  the  hand  operated  switch. 

By  having  the  pliuiger  18  disconnected  from  the  I 
oontaot  whioh  it  is  to  oporate,  the  evil  effeotQ  of  ohat-| 
toring,  whioh  are  liable  to  ooour  in  alternating  current  : 


(13) 


apparatus ,  are  obviated.  That  portion  of  the  device  in-  j 
oluding  the  Bolenoid  winding  17  and  the  oontaots  45  and  51  j 
aots  as  a  relay  for  the i eleotro-magnets  26  and  27  which 
oontrol  oontaots  34  and  37  carrying  large  currents.  In 
ray  irajiroved  apparatus  I  am  enabled  to  oombino  sensitiveness 
and  positiveness  of  aotion,  and  no  ohattering  whatever 
ooours. 


Having  now  described  my  invention,  what  I 
olaim  as  new  therein  and  desire  to  proteot  by  Letters 
Patent  is  as  follows:-  ^  \ 

- . — -  C  ~  vX\>V' 

1.  In  a  systehk  of  the  class  desoribed,  the  oombih- 
ation  of  a  storage  battery  and  moans  for  supplying  uni¬ 
directional  ourrent  therettu  including  a  source  of  alter¬ 
nating  current,  rectifying  metwis,  and  means  controlled  by 
tlio^sa^dT  souroo  for  oontrolling\the  oonnootion  of  the 
battery  to  the  rectifying  means,  substantially  as  de¬ 
soribed. 


2.  In  a  system  of  the  olass  desoribed,  the  oombina- j 
tion  of  a  storage  battery  and  means  for  supplying  uni¬ 
directional  current  thereto,  including  a  source  of  alter¬ 
nating  ourrent,  rectifying  moans,  and  automatic  means  for 
maintaining  the  oonneotion  of  the  battery  to  the  rectify¬ 
ing  means  while  the  voltage  of  the  source  is  in  exoese  of 
a  predetermined  value  and  for  breaking  the  oonneotion  when 
the  voltage  of  the  souroe  fallB  below  said  value,  substan¬ 
tially  as  described. 


(14) 


1-^  3.  In  a  system  of  the  olass  described,  the  oombina- 

tion  of  a  storage  battery  and  means  for  charging  the  same, 

I  including  a  souroe  of  alternating  ourrent,  rectifying  means, 
a  manually  operated  ewitoh,  and  an  automatic  switch  govern- 
■'■/!!  ea  hy  the  voltage  of  the  souroe  for  controlling  the  oonneo- 
|i  - . - 

jj  tion  and  disoonneotion  of  the  battery  and  rectifying  means, 

||  said  automatio  switoh  being  operable  to  oonneot  the  battery 
•g  and  rectifying  means  only  when  the  manually  operated  switoh 
jj  is  closed,  substantially  as  desoribed. 

jj  -c,  4.  jn  a  system  of  the  olass  described,  the  oombina-  j 

j|  tion  of  a  storage  battery  and  moans  for  oharging  the  same,  ! 
;  inoluaing  a  transformer  having  primary  and  secondary  wind-  j 
ings,  rectifying  moans,  an  automatio  switoh  having  a  wina- 
I  ing  supplied  with  ourrent  from  the  primary  and  having  oon- 
i  taots  controlled  by  said  switoh  winding  for  making  and 
!j  breaking  oonneotion  between  the  battery  and  the  rectifying 
|  means,  ana  a  manually  operated  switoh  for  controlling  the 


automatio  switoh  oirouit  and  the  battery  oonneotion,  sub- 
I  stantially  as  desoribed. 

L  I  -£***’  fe'/'Y  , 

In  apparatus  of  the  olass  deBoribed,  a  fixed 
f  oontact7^a>-J8oyable  oontaot  oo-operating  therewith,  a  solon- 
|  oid,  and  a  plungei-^for  the  solenoid  for  controlling  the 
movable  oontaot  but  aisooimeoted  therefrom,  substantially 


j  ^ ‘  6.  In  apparatus  of  the  olaBB  desoribodT^a^station- 
i'  ary  oontaot,  a  movable  oontaot  Bpring -pressed  into  oirbuit^ 


(15) 


-olosing  position,  a  member  loosely  connected  with  said 
Triable  oontaot  for  moving  the  Bame  out  of  oirouit  olosing 
.position,  a  solenoid,  and  a  plunger  held  free  from  said 
ji  raemboV  when  the  solenoid  is  energized,  but  located  to  im- 
ij  pinge  upon  said  member  when  the  solenoid  is  de-energized 
|  to  oause\eparation  of  the  fixed  and  movable  jontaots,  sub- 
Btantially \s  described. 

I  Crf  Jfm  jn  apparatus  of  the  class  described,  an  insulat- 
;  ing  plate,  a  hollow  oylinder  mounted  on  one  end  thereof  and 
j|  vertically  disposed,  a  stationary  oontaot  mounted  on  the 
\  upper  end  of  the  oyknder  and  insulated  therefrom,  an 
j!  elongated  member  extending  through  the  bottom  of  the  oylin- 
!  der  and  the  insulating  plate  and  having  in  its  upper  and  a 
ji  oontaot  adopted  to  co-operate  with  the  fixed  oontaot,  a 
!|  spring  for  olosing  said  oonkaots,  a  pivoted  member  opora- 
|  tively  related  to  the  movable\oontact-oarrying  member  so 
\  that  when  the  free  end  of  the  pivoted  member  is  depressed 
ij  the  movable  oontaot  is  separated\rom  the  fixed  contact,  a 
j!  solenoid  mounted  vertioally  on  said\insulating  plate,  and 
1  a  gravity-aotuated  plunger  for  the  solenoid  located  to 
|  impinge  upon  the  free  end  of  the  pivoted^member  when  the 
'I  ourrent  in  the  solenoid  is  reduced  a  predetermined  amount , 

!:  \ 

|i  substantially  as  desoribed.  \ 

,  <•'  0<  jn  apparatus  of  the  olasB  desoribed\vfixed  and 

'  ji  movable  oontaots,  a  solenoid  having  a  gravity  abated 
I  plunger  unoonneoted  to  said  oontaots  but  looated  to  sep¬ 
arate  the  same  when  the  solenoid  is  de-energized  |  arid  an 
electro -magnet  having  its  oirouit  controlled  by  said  Con¬ 
tacts  |  substantially  as  desoribed.  \ 


(16) 


, ' 9.  In  apparatus  of  the  olass  described,  fixed  and 
ratable  oontaota,  a  solenoid  having  a  gravity  aotuated 
plurteer  unoonneoted  to  said  oontaots  but  looated  to  sep- 
aratethe  samo  When  the  solenoid  ia  de-energized, (an  eleo- 
tro-m^gnht  having  its  circuit  oontrollea  by  said  oontaots, 
and  an\da’itional  oontaot  controlled  by  said  electro-magnet  ,|) 
substantially  as  dosoribed. 

h  \  \ 

.....  10.  In  apparatus  of  the  olass  dosoribed,  a  vertical¬ 

ly  disposed  solenoid  and  a  plunger  therefor  having  its.  lower1! 
portion  of  magnotio  fhid  its  upper  portion  of  non-magnotio 
material,  substan^ially-as  described. 

\  \ 

/  ll.  in  apparatus  of  the  olass  described,  a  vertical¬ 
ly  disposed  solenoid  a  plunger  therefor  having  its  lower] 
portion  of  magnetio  and  its  upper  portion  of  non-magnetio 
material,  said  plunger  having  means  for  limiting  its  d.ovm- 
ward  movement,  substantially Vs  described. 

(•■  12.  In  apparatus  of  the  class  dosoribed,  a  vertical¬ 
ly  disposed  solenoid  and  a  plunge^ therefor  having  its  low¬ 
er  portion  of  magnetio  and  its  upper ^portion  of  non-magnotioj 
material,  said  plunger  having  means  for  limiting  its  upward 
and  downward  movements,  substantially  asx described. 

($■'  13.  In  apparatus  of  the  olass  described,  a  Vertically] 

I  disposed  solenoid  and  a  plunger  therefor  having  its  lbwer 
j!  portion  of  magnetio  and  itB  upper  portion  of  ndn-magnetio. 
ii  material,  said  plunger  having  moans  for  limiting  \Lts  down- 

Iward  movement,  and  having  an  insulating  member  seoilredito 
its  lower  end,  substantially  as  described. 


! 


(17) 


\14.  In  apparatus  of  the  olass  described ,  u  spring 
|  contact  having  a  oontral  elongated  portion  ana  ends)  bent 
I  baok  toward  eaoh  other,  one  of  said  ends  being  split  to 
form  a  Aexible  oontaot  faoe,  substantially  as  desoribed. 

(_  2-  15.  \ln  apparatus  of  the  olass  doooribod,  a  supporting 

!  member,  a  pair  of  electro -magnet 4  supported  horizontally 
thereon,  an  immature  for  the  oleotro-magnets,  guiding  means 
for  the  armntur\o,  and  a  horizontally  dioposod  extension  on 
the  eleotro-magntet'  having  its  free  end  extended  through  the 
ji  supporting  member\  substantially  as  desoribed. 

;j  16.  In  apparatus  of  the  olass  desoribed,  a  support- 

'  ing  member,  a  pair  of\ electro-magnets  supported  horizontally 
i|  thereon,  an  armature  for  the  eleotro -magneto,  guiding  means 
jj  for  the  armature,  a  fixed  oontaot  and  a  movable  oontaot  oo- 
|  operating  therewith  and  normally  biased  out  of  oirouit 
jj  closing  position,  and  a  horizontally  disposed  extension  on 

j;  the  eleotro-magnet  adapted  t\  engage  the  movable  oontaat 
|  \ 

ji  and  foroe  it  into  oirouit  olosing  position  when  the  eleotro- 
j magnets  are  energized,  substantially  as  desoribed. 

j  rl  \  , 

jj  IV.  In  apparatus  of  the  oIssb  desoribed,  (the  oom- 
j bination  of  a  stationary  oontaot,  eXspring  oontaot  mounted 
jj  to  co-operato  therewith  and  normally 'biased  out  of  oontaot 
jj  therewith,  a  member  located  to  engage  ^aid  spring  oontaot 
Ij  to  move  it  into  oirouit  closing  positiori  and  inoluding  an 
jjarmature,  an  eleotro-magnet  for  moving  said  member  into  oon- 
jjtaot  engaging  position,;-  contacts  normally  biased  to  dosed 
jjposition  for  controlling (thej  oirouit  i>f  saidV eleotro-magnet , 
|a  pivoted  member  operatively  oonneoted  (to  one  No  fj)  said  oir- 


owl-t^-oontroia^g  oontaotsj,  a  Bolenoid,  and  a  plunger  there¬ 
for,  the  said  plunger  being  looated  to  impinge  upon  the  fre 
end  of  the  pivoted  mombar  to  open  said  oirouit-oontrolling 
oontaots  when  the  solenoid  lb  do-energized,  substantially 
as  dosoribed. 

5\..  ^  V,  M 

C_~  c:  9-o : _ \  .  v\  \s\\v>  ■ 


©atb. 


State -of  J?eto  3Ter«cp  j  ^ 

Count?  of  CSSex  j 

SAM  G.  LAITCIiEY  -  ^  al)ot,E  mmt> 

petitioner,  being  buly  Stoorn,  beposes  anb  saps  tljnt  Ije  is  a  citizen  of  tije  Unitcb 
States,  anb  a  rcSibctlt  of  v/ost  Ornngo ,  Easex  County,  New  Jersey  • 


tijat  Ije  berily  beliebes  ijimsclf  to  be  tlje  original,  first  anb  sole  inbrntor  of  tije 
improbements  in 

MEANS  EOR  CHARCIHG  STORAGE  BATTERIES 


bcScribcb  anb  claimcb  in  tije  annexcb  Specification ;  tljnt  Ije  boeS  not  Imoto  anb 
bocs  not  beliebe  tijat  tije  same  Urns  eber  bnobm  or  useb  before  fjis  inbention  or 
biscoberp  tijereof;  or  patenteb  or  bescribeb  in  an?  printeb  publication  in  tije 
Uniteb  States  of  America  or  an?  foreign  countr?  before  fjis  inbention  or 
biscober?  tijereof,  or  more  tijnn  ttoo  pears  prior  to  tijis  application;  or  patenteb 
in  an?  countr?  foreign  to  tije  ISlniteb  States  on  an  application  fileb  more  tijan 
ttoclbe  tnontijS  prior  to  tijis  application;  or  in  public  use  or  on  sale  in  tije 
HHniteb  States  for  more  tijan  ttoo  pears  prior  to  tijis  application;  anb  tijat  no 


application  for  patent  upon  Saib  inbention  Ijas  been  fileb  b?  ijim  or  bis  legal 
representatibes  or  assigns  in  an?  foreign  countr?.  - 


gitoorn  to  anb  subscribeb  before  me  tijis  /-4^ba?  of/^2^-  \4)\  3- 
i^otar?  public. 


[fecal] 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 


UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 

WASHINGTON  February  4,  1913. 

n  0.  Langley, 

Frank  L.  Dyer,  '  ut'  4  L91° 


Orange,  11.  J. 

Please  find  below  a  .»»»»«»  from,  the  EXAMINER  in.  oharfio  of  your  application.^ 

for  Means  for  Charging  Storage  Batteries,  filed  June  IB,  191*-. 
Serial  Ho.  704,338. 


u 


If  applicant* o  full  first  name  ie  H8nm",  affidavit  to  that 
effect  should  he  filed.  If  that  is  not  his  full  first  name  tho 
correct  name  should  he  inserted  in  tho  preamble  to  tho  specification. 

The  numerals  30  and  31  should  he  placed  on  Fig.  1.  It  is  not 
8een  how  the  current  could  he  supplied  from  tho  rectifying  system 
as  stated  on  page  11,  line  2B,  before  the  BWitch  37  is  closed. 

A  plurality  of  inventione  are  claimed  in  this  application. 
Claims  1  to  4  are  drawn  to  a  syBtem  classifiable  in  171-Bystoms, 
Secondary  Battery.  Claims  5  to  13  are  drawn  to  an  electromagnetic 
switch  for  the  contaots  B1  and  4B.  This  device  seems  to  ho 
independent  in  its  mode  of  operation  from  the  system  and  is 
classifiable  in  another  subclass  of  this  Offioe.  Claims  14  to 
17  are  drawn  to  still  another  electromagnetic  switch,  which  is 
considered. to  he  an  independent  device. 

Division  is  required  along  the  lines  suggested. 


.7  0  El  V  ED 


l_C.  H.  WILSON, 


IN  THE  UHITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 

i  Sam  G.  langley 

MEANS  FOR  CHARGING  STOHAGE 
|  BATTERIES 

Room  Ho.  105 

!  Filed  June  18,  1912 
Serial  No.  704,338 

|  HONORABLE  COMMISSIONER  OS’  PATENTS, 

SIR: 

:  In  response  to  the  Offioo  aotion  of 

|  February  4,  1913,  please  amend  the  above  entitled  oase 
||  as  follows:- 

Page  11,  lines  24  and  25,  oanoe).  "or  by  recti¬ 
fied  ourrent  supplied  from  the  reotifying  system". 

Page  12,  line  24,  after  "transformer."  insert 
j  the  sentenoe  -  [  while  the  battery  is  being  ohargefl.  the 
I  reotifying  system  oo -operates  with  the  battery  in  supplying 
ourrent  to  tho  magnet  windings  26  and  27.  - 

Canoel  olaims  5  to  17  inolusive. 

The  Examiner  is  requested  to  apply  in  Figure  1 
|  the  reference  numeral  30  to  the  armature  and  the  reference 
ij  numeral  31  to  the  member  seoured  at  right  angleB  to  the 
armature . 

REMARKS 

Claims  5  to  17  inolusive  have  been  oanoeled  in 
compliance  with  the  Examiner's  requirement  of  division. 
Applioant  reserves  the  right  to  file  a  divisional  applioa- 


(1) 


I  tion  or  applications  on  the  subject  matter  of  the  claims 
canoeled. 


Aotion 


on  the  merits  is  requested. 
Respectfully  submitted, 
SAM  G.  LANGLEY 


His  Attorney 


Orange,  New  Jersey 
January  3/  ,  1914 


HL-JS 


STATE  OP  HEW  JERSEY  ) 

;  SS. : 

COUHTY  OP  ESSEX  ) 

SAE  G.  TjAHGIEY,  whose  application 
for  Letters  Patent  for  HE  AITS  POR  CHARC-IITG  STORAGE  BATTERIES, 
Serial  Ho. 704, 358,  was  filed  in  tho  United  States  Patent 
Offioo  on  or  about  the  18th  day  of  June ,  1918,  being  duly 
sworn,  deposes  and  says  that  his  full  first  name  is  "Sam",  j 

/  A  *  ! 

|  Jr-  Jn .  ■/  ns  ■&>  ■  A A</ _  I 


Sworn  to  and  subscribed  before  me 
/— 

this  3/^  day  of  January,  1914 


4« 


A  /  i/  ~ 


\%>> 


s 


;  I 


Dlv.  -.26-  Boom  100 


-—200 


vco 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 
aii  UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 

WASHINGTON  . Apsll..2«,..i91.4a . 


Please  find  below  a  communication  from  the  EXAMINER  in  charge  of  the  application  of 


jfom.ft.  Langley.,  Serial  Bo.  704,056,  XUod.  June. IB;.  1912,. for. 
Means  for  Charging  Storage  Batteries. 


Qonmimoner  of  Patent*.  (J 


In  response  to  amendment  of  Peb.  2,  1914. 

The  numeral a  *30*  and  "31"  have  been  applied  to  Pig.  1  ae 
requested.  The  numeral  *18"  should  also  be  applied  to  this 

figure.— . — - - - - - - . . . - . . 

Inasmuch  as  applicant  has  eleoted  to  olalm  the  system,  the 
figures  on.  sheet  2  ohould  be  oanoelled,  together  with  their 
description.  (/// 

Olalm  1  is  rejected  on  Maxim,  742,880,  Hot.  3,  1903,  Bystane, 
Secondary  Battery. 

The  other  claims  are  allowed. 


IN  IBB  UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 


Sam  G.  Langley 

MEANS  BOR  CHARGING  STORAGE  BATTERIES 

Piled  June  18,  1912  Hoorn  No.  106. 

Serial  No.  704, SS8 

HONORABLE  COMMISSIONER  OB  PATENTS, 

SIR: 

In  response  to  the  Offioo  action  of 
April  29,  1914,  please  amend  the  above  entitled  case  aB 
follows :- 

Claim  1,  lino  S,  before  "said"  insert  -  voltage 

of  -  . 

Add  the  following  claims:  - 

5.  In  a  system  of  the  olssa  described,  the  com¬ 
bination  of  a  storage  battery  and  means  for  supplying  uni¬ 
directional  currant  thereto,  including  a  souroo  of  current, 
rectifying  moan3,  and  moans  for  automatically  establishing 
oonneotion  between  said  storage  battery  and  said  rectifying 
means  whenever  a  predetermined  eleotrioal  condition  exists 
in  said  souroo,  substantially  as  described. 

G.  In  a  system  of  the  olass  described,  the  com¬ 
bination  of  a  storage  battery  and  moans  for  charging  the 
same,  including  a  souroo  of  alternating  current,  rectify¬ 
ing  means,  and  oontaots  for  making  and  breaking  oonneotion 
between  the  battery  and  the  rectifying  means,  said  oontaots 
being  automatically  moved  relatively  to  eaoh  other  into 


(1) 


oiroi3.it  matins  or  'breaking  position  aooording  to  the  eleo- 
trioal  condition  of  said  souroe,  substantially  as  described. 

3  E  M  A  H  K  S 

The  Examiner  is  requested  to  withdraw  tho  re- 
auiroment  that  the  figures  on  sheet  2  be  canceled.  These 
figures  aid  materially  in  a  clear  and  ready  understanding 
of  the  speoifio  system  in  which  the  invention  is  shown  as 
embodied,  and  contribute  to  the  explanation,  required  by 
statute,  of  the  best  mode  in  which  applioant  has  contem¬ 
plated  applying  the  principle  of  his  invention.  The  can¬ 
cellation  of  these  figuros  would  necessitate  a  considerable 
revision  of  the  specification  and  probably  amendments  to 
Figure  1  of  the  drawing,  inasmuch  as  this  figure  is  largely 
diagrammatic.  It  is  not  believed  that  the  reference  num¬ 
eral  18  should  he  applied  to  Figure  1,  inasmuch  as  thiB 
referenoe  numeral  designates  merely  the  lower  portion  of 
the  core,  and  in  Figure  1  no  line  of  demarcation  1b  shown 
between  the  upper  and  lower  portions  of  the  core. 

Claim  1  has  been  amended  to  distinguish  from  the 
patent  to  Maxim  cited,  by  reciting  that  the  connection- 
controlling  moans  is  controlled  by  tho  voltage  of  the 
souroe. 

In  the  patent  to  Maxim,  the  under  load  circuit 
breakers  7  and.  7a  are  not  self-restoring  hut  must  be  reset 
by  head,  rhoroe.s  in  applicant's  system  the  connection  be¬ 
tween  tho  storage  hattory  and  the  rectifying  means  is 
automatic  ally  established  wherever  a  predetermined  eleo- 
trioal  condition  exists  in  the  souroe,  and  the  oontaots 

(2) 


II 


for  miring  anti  breaking  connaotion  botv/eon  the  battery  and 
the  rectifying  mottne  are  automatically  mo  rod  relatively  to 
each  other  into  ciror.it  making  or  breaking  pooition  ao- 
oo r ding  to  ths  electrical  condition  of  said  source.  One 
or  tho  other  of  these  distinction?1  appears  in  oaoh  of  new 
olL'ims  B  and  6,  and  those  oleins  are  believed  to  be  oloarly 
patentable. 

Reconsideration  and  alio nonce  are  requested. 

Reepootfully  submitted. 


SAM  G.  MHGEEY 


3y  3hcuu< 


Orange,  W.  J. 

April  ^  ,  1916 


HI-JS 


2-200 


Div.ilii Room — X05  RM 

“The  CommUsIonor  of  patent*, 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 
UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 

WASHINGTON  _ June__22  ,...1915.,. . 


Please  find  below  a  communication  from  the  EXAMINER  in  charge  of  the  application  of 

S.  0.  Lanalev.  filed  Juna..in_^JLai^toX-M^3-fox.^ghrtrglns-.IMiataEc  — 
Batteries. _ 8er .  Ho.  ?04^:i33-» - . - 


OommiMumer  of  Patents.  -V  . 


In  response  to  amendment  filed  Apr.  10,  1915^--  s 

Claims  1,  5  and  6  are  rejeoted  on  Schelbe ,7959 ,513j  May 
31,  1910,  Systems ,  3eo.  Bat,  or  Soheibe,  95^544,  May  31,  3.910, 
Systems,  8oo.  Bat.  In  explanation,  it  may  be  stated  that  the  tilt¬ 
ing  coils  21  and  23  of  the  references  whioh  serve  to  establish  connec¬ 
tion  within  the  reotifier  are  thought  to  be  equivalent  to  means  for 
establishing  connection  between  the  storage  battery  and  rectifying 
means. 

,  jt  ,  C  /S  . 

?r7,  J" /  3  at -c 


Bxami : 


Division  26, 


IN  the  united  states  patent  office. 


Sam  G.  Langley 

MEANS  FOB  CHARGING  STORAGE 
BATTERIES 

Filea  June  18,  1912 
Serial  Ho.  704,338 

Hon.  Commissioner  of  Patents. 

SIR: 

In  response  to  the  Office  aol 
please  amend  the  above  entitled  case 


Room  Ho.  105. 


tion  of  June  22, 
as  follows: 


1915, 


_ Rewrite  olalro  1  as  follows; _ ; _ „ 

1.  In  a  system  of  the  olass  described,  the  com¬ 
bination  of  a  storage  battery  and  means  for  supplying  uni¬ 
directional  ourront  thereto,  including  a  source  of  alternate.-, 
ing  ourrent,  rectifying  means,  and  moans  controlled  by  the 
voltage  of  said  source  for  connecting  said  battery  to  said 
rectifying  means,  substantially  as  desoribed. 

Add  the  following  claim: 

7.  In  a  system  of  the  claBs  desoribed,  the  com¬ 
bination  of  a  storage  battery  and  means  for  charging  the 
same,  including  a  souroo  of  alternating  ourrent,  a  transform¬ 
er,  rectifying  means,  a  connection  between  the  rectifying 
means  and  the  battery,  a  oonnection  between  the  transformer 
and  the  source  of  ourrent,  an  automatic  switoh  having  a 
winding  supplied  with  alternating  ourrent  from  the  source 
and  having  oontaots  controlled  by  said  winding  in  the  con¬ 
nection  between  the  battery  and  the  rectifying  means,  and  a 
manually  operated  switoh  for  simultaneously  controlling  said 
connections  and  the  automatio  Bwitoh  winding,  substantially 
as  desoribed. _ 


REMARKS 


The  patent  to  Soheiho  was  evidently  incorrectly 
cited  hy  the  Examiner  ana  should  have  been  oited  as  IIo. 
959,613.  This  patent  showe  a  rectifying  system  in  which  a 
mercury  vapor  rectifier  is  employed.  Mercury  vapor  recti¬ 
fying  devices  oeaso  to  operate  if  the  alternating  current 
oirouits  are  broken  or  if  the  supply  of  energy  is  tempor¬ 
arily  interrupted  for  any  cause.  Such  devices  are  re¬ 
started  by  tilting  the  rectifier  bulbs  and  in  a  system  of 
this  kind  it  is  necessary  to  provide  means  for  retilting 
the  above  bulb  when  the  current  supply  fails,  ana  this  is 
the  principal  object  of  the  Soheibe  patent.  In  applicant >8 
system,  the  problem  is  quite  different  inasmuch  as  the 
type  of  rectifier  used  in  applicant's  system  iB  self¬ 
starting,  but  means  must  be  provided  for  interrupting  the 
l  direct  current  circuit  in  order  to  prevent  tho  discharge 
of  the  battery  through  the  rectifying  dovicos  if  their  con¬ 
tacts  shoflaa  happen  to  be  in  dosed  position  when  the  de¬ 
vices  cease  to  operate.  In  applicant's  system,  means  is 
provided  for  automatically  opening  the  battery  circuit  when 

Ifche  alternating  ourrent  supply  fails  or  falls  below  a  pre¬ 
determined  value.  in  the  Soheibe  patent,  connection  within 
the  rectifier  is  established,  when  the  bulb  is  tilted,  from 
the  starting  terminul  27a  through  the  mercury  to  tho  direct 
ourrent  terminal  14.  These  elements,  however,  form  a  nec¬ 
essary  part  of  the  rectifying  devioe.  The  patent  to  Jack- 
eon  and  Soheibe,  Ho.  969,644,  shows  a  similar  system  and  the 
disoussion  of  the  Soheibe  patent  applies  also  to  the  Jack- 
son  and  Soheibe  patent. 

While  olaim  1  as  formerly  presented  is  not 
believed  to  be  met  by  either  of  these  patents,  the  olaim 
has  been  rewritten  in  order  to  distinguish  from  these 

-2- 


patents  more  clearly,  and  in  the  claim  as  rewritten  there  isj 
recited  "moans  controlled  hy  the  voltage  of  said  source  for 
connecting  said  battery  to  said  rectifying  means"  and  the 
means  so  described  is  in  addition  to  the  rectifying  means. 

It  is  believed  that  this  claim  distinguishes  clearly  from 
the  patents  discussed  above  inasmuch  as  that  in  these  pat¬ 
ents  there  is  no  element  in  addition  to  the  rectifying 
means  constituting  "-ana  controlled  by  the  voltage  of  said 
source  for  connecting  said  battery  to  said  rectifying  moans", 
Reconsideration  of  the  rejection  of  claims  5  and 
6  is  requested.  Claim  6  recites  "rectifying  means,  and  meanj 
for  automatically  establishing  connection  between  said  | 

storage  battery  and  said  rectifying  moans  whenever  a  pre¬ 
determined  electrical  condition  exists  in  said  source".  The | 
patents  discussed  above  do  not  shew  the  second  mentioned 
means  in  addition' to  rectifying  means.  Similarly  in  claim 
6  in  addition  to  the  rectifying  means  there  are  recited 
"contacts  for  making  and  breaking  connection  between  the 
battery  and  the  rectifying  means,  said  contacts  being  auto-  ^ 
matically  moved  relatively  to  each  other  into  circuit  making 
or  breaking  position  according  to  the  electrical  condition 
of  said  source".  The  Soheibe  patents  do  not  show  such 
_ addition  to  the  rectifying  means. 


Hew  claim  7  clearly  distinguishes  from  the  Soheibe 
patents  by  reciting  "a  connection  between  the  rectifying 
means  and  the  battery"  and  contacts  controlled  by  the  auto¬ 
matic  switch  winding  in  the  connection  between  the  battery 
and  the  rectifying  means.  This  claim  also  distinguishes 
from  the  patent  to  Maxim,  previously  cited,  in  setting 
forth  that  the  automatic  switch  has  a  winding  supplied  with 
alternating  current  frem  the  source  and  has  contacts  con¬ 
trolled  by  said  winding  in  the  connection  between  the  ; 


■battery  ana  the  rectifying  means,  and  in  reciting  a  manually 
operated  switch  for  simultaneously  controlling  the  battery 
and  source  of  current  connections.  One  advantage  of  ap¬ 
plicant's  systom  is  that  by  opening  the  manually  operated, 
switoh  tho  rectifying  apparatus  is  simultaneously  discon¬ 
nected  from  tho  outside  source  end  the  battery,  and  since 
the  break  in  the  direct  current  circuit  occurs  at  the  manu¬ 
ally  operated  switch  before  it  occurs  at  the  contacts  of 
tho  automatic  switch,  there  is  no  sparking  at  the  contacts 
of  the  automatic  switoh  and  these  contacts  are  therefore 
protected.  See  page  IS  of  the  specification,  linos  23  to 
26  inclusive. 

The  claims  now  presented  are  bolieved  to  be 
patentable,  and  reconsideration  and  allowance  are  requested 
Respectfully  submitted, 

SAM  G.  LANGLEY 

Ry  S^La^-tC  £  •  _ 

IIIiB  Attorney 
Orange,  H.  J. 

June  /<i~t  1916 

HL 


Ill  SHE  UHI5ED  STASES  FATEBT  OFFICE 


1KEAHS  FOR  CHARGIKO  STORAGE 
BATTERIES 

Filed  June  18,  1912 
Serial  Ho.  704,538 
Allowed  July  22,  1916 


AUEBBHFBT  UNDER  RUEF. 


IHOBORABER  OOLUI8SIOHP.R  OF  FATEH 53 , 

SIR: 

Please  amend  the  above  entitled  ease 
under  Rule  78  without  withdrawing  the  some  i'rom  issue,  as 
.  follows 

insert  the  following  paragraph  at  the  end  of 

j  211 - :  w  oop9ndjJftl!:^p^lioations  Serial  Mo .  136 , n%, 

'  filed  December  13,  1916,  and  Serial  Ho.  136, 78^,  filer 
j  D.o„«r  18.  1916.  «.  ta”of  “a  00°tOi”  °1,i“ 

I  covering  the  autonuitio  sw^tch_dgvioe. — - - -  ~ 

j  page  4 , ''lino  26,  oanoel  "is". 

page  0,  litfo’TTT'ohange  "66"  to  -  64  -  . 


a»  I»UB  1.  to  «>“» 

tt.  .»».».«•  *  “  *• mt"  ”ut  “  ”* 

97  in  Figure  6  of  the  drawings  to  36* . 

The  present  amendment  is  made  merely  for  the  pur- 
.1  eoxreotlnR  cartel.  l»tor»»lltlo.  an.  for 


reference  to  two  divisional  applications.  It  is  according¬ 
ly  requested  that  the  Examiner  recommend  the  admission  of 
this  amendment. 

Respectfully  submitted, 

SAM  5.  IAIWLSY 

By  X.  - 

His  Attorney 

Orange,  H.  J. 

December 4  ,  1916 


WH-JS 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 
g  UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 

£  Washington  July,  22,1916 

m  3am. G.  Langley,  Aasor, 

^  Sir:  Your  APPLICATION  for  a  patent  for  an  IMPROVEMENT  in 
to 

°  Means  for  Charging  Storage  Batteries, 

§  filed  June.  10,  1912  ,  has  been  examined  and  ALLOWED. 

|  The  final  fee,  TWENTY  DOLLARS,  must  be  paid  not  later  than  m 

SIX  MONTHS  from  the  date  of  this  present  notioe  of  allowanoe.  ■ 
§  If  the  final  fee  be  not  paid  within  that  period,  the  patent  on  1 
this  application  will  be  withheld,  unless  renewed  with  an  c 

M  additional  fee  of  $16,  under  the  provisions  of  Seotion  4897,  2 

Revised  Statutes.  g 

S  The  office  delivers  patents  upon  the  day  of  their  date, and  q 

|  on  whioh  their  term  begins  to  run.  The  printing,  photolitho-  j; 
g  graphing,  and  engrossing  of  the  several  patent  parts,  prepara-  j- 
S  tory  to  final  signing  and  sealing,,  will  require  about  four  £ 

j  weeks,  and" such  work  will  not  be  undertaken  until  after  payment  f 

h  of  the  neoessary  fee.  g 

■«  When  you  send  the  final  fee  you  will  also  send,  DISTINCTLY  | 

a  AND  PLAINLY  WRITTEN,  the  name  of  the  INVENTOR,  TITLE  OP  INVEN-  g 
h  TION,'  AND  SERIAL  NUMBER  AS  ABOVE  GIVEN,  DATE  OF  ALLOWANCE 
§  (whioh  is  the  date  of  this  oiroular),  DATE  OF  FILING,  and,  if  J 

assigned,  the  NAMES  OF  THE  ASSIGNEES.  t 

g  If  you  desire  to  have  the  patent  issue  to  ASSIGNEES,  an 

g  assignment  containing  a  REQUEST  to  that  effeot,  together  with  \ 
°  the  FEE  for  recording  the  same,  must  be  filed  in  this  office  on  y 
H  or  before  the  date  of  payment  of  final  fee.  t 

fc  After  issue  of  the  patent  uncertified  oopies  of  the  draw-  6 

H  ings  and  specifications  may  be  purchased  at  the  price  of  FIVE  > 

_  g  CENTS  EACH.  The  money  should  aooompany  the  order.  Postage  c 

[rj  stamps  will  "not  be  reoeived.  E 

“  Final  fees  will  NOT  be  reoeived  from  other  than  the  appli-  t 

gjj  oant,  his  assignee  or  attorney,  or  a  party  in  interest  as  shown  { 
H  by  the  reoords  of  the  Patent  Office, 
e  Respectfully, 


,‘i  Erapk.L.JOytjr',. 


/ 


I 


Papal  Ho.  9, 


DEPARTMENT  OH  THE  INTERIOR. 
United  States  Patent  Office. 


In  re  application. 
Baa  Q.  Langley , 

•Moans  for  Charging 
Storage  Batteries,* 

Piled  June  18,  1918, 
Rerial  Ho.  704. 538. 


:  Before  the 

:  Hon.  Oottunleeioner  of  Patente. 

s  On  Petition. 

Bxaalnsr'e  Statement. 


It  ie  recommended  that  the  petition  to  amend  the  above 


entitled  application  under  Rule  78  be  granted,  but  that  the 
eerial  number  given  aa  *130,781*  In  line  2  of  the  amendment 
whioh  iVis  proposed  to  insert  at  the  end  of  page  1  be  changed 
to  150,782  by  examinir* e  aaindment,  bifare  entry  of  the  proposed 


Respectfully  submitted, 


■Washington,  D.  C. , 
January  4,  1917. 


Bftamlner,  Division  20. 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 
UNITED  STATES  PATENT  OFFICE 
WASHINGTON 


January  6,  1917. 


In  the  matter  of  the  ) 

Application  of  > 

Sam  G.  Langley  > 

Means  for  Charging  Storage  ) 
Batteries; 

Filed  June  18,  1912  J 

Serial  KO.  704,338.  I 


Amendment. 


Sir; 

You  are  hereby  informed  that  the  recommenda¬ 
tion  of  the  esaminer  that  the  amendment  he  admitted 
under  the  provisions  of  Rule  76,  a  copy  of  vhloh  nas 
mailed  to  you  under  date  of  the  14th  instant,  has  been 
approved  by  the  First  Assistant  Commissioner  and  the 
amendment  entered. 

By  direotion  of  the  Commissioner! 

Very  respectfully. 


Folic 


STATEMENT  OP  INVENTOR 

Invention 

Conoeivecl  on_^i^ 

Disclosed  ti 

Made  drawing 


Note:  This  statement,  together  with  sketch,  to  be  put  in  the 

-  application  file. 


[ON  BACK  OF  PREVIOUS  DOCUMENT] 


i 

Maroh  12,  1913 

Conference  with  Mr-  Langley  on  Vibrating  Type 
of  Alternating  Cnrrent  Reotifier. 

Was  informed  for  the  first  time  that  the  armatures 
employed  in  the  type  of  rectifier  now  put  out  oonsist  each 
of  two  parts  riveted  together.  An  armature  oonsisting  of 
two  parts  capable  of  independent  vibration  is  not  employed 


S.  L. 


Mr.  Edison.  ^QJilQ  Q61  _  application  of  Sam  G.  Langley  for 
Means  for  Charging  Storage  Batteries 


This  application  covers  a  system  and  apparatus  for 
disoonneoting  the  rectifying  devices  from  the  Battery  when  the 
alternating  current  fails  or  falls  Below  predetermined  value 
and  for  reconnecting  the  same  when  the  current  increases  to  a 
predetermined  value.  The  application  was  filed  with  claims 
for  the  system  and  also  claims  for  the  epeoifio  magnetic  switches 
used  in  the  system.  Division  was  required  and  we  elected  to 
retain  the  claims  covering  the  system.  .  The  application  haB  now 
Been  allowed  with  very  good  claims  covering  the  system  -  see  for 
example  the  following  claims 


1.  In  a  system  of  the  class  described,  the  oom- 
Bination  of  a  storage  Battery  and  means  for  supplying  uni¬ 
directional  current  thereto,  including  a  source  of  alternat¬ 
ing  current,  rectifying  means,  and  means  controlled  By  the 
voltage  of  said  source  for  connecting  said  Battery  to  Bald 
rectifying  means,  suBstantially  as  desoriBed. 


5.  in  a  system  of  the  class  desoriBed,  the  com¬ 
bination  of  a  storage  Battery  and  means  for  supplying  uni¬ 
directional  current  thereto,  including  a  souroe  of  current, 
rectifying  means,  and  means  for  automatically  establishing 
oonneotion  Between  said  storage  Battery  and  said  rectifying 
means  whenever  a  predetermined  electrical  condition  exists 
in  said  souroe,  substantially  as  desoriBed, 


6.  In  a  system  of  the  class  described,  the  com¬ 
bination  of  a  storage  Battery  and  means  for  oharging  the 
same,  including  a  souroe  of  alternating  ourrent,  rectify¬ 
ing  means,  and  contacts  for  making  and  Breaking  oonneotion 
Between  the  Battery  and  the  rectifying  means,  said  contacts 
Being  automatically  moved  relatively  to  eaoh  other  into 
circuit  making  or  Breaking  position  according  to  the  eleo- 
trioal  condition  of  said  source,  suBstantially  as  desoriBed. 


i  presume  you  will  wish  this  patent  taken  out. 

""in'  this  system  there  is  employed  a  relay  switch  and 
/^main-switch,  both  mounted  An  the  fJame'%£,  The  Patent  Office 
considers  these  switches  as  separate  inventions  and  to  secure 
protection  on  the  same  we  would  probably  have  to  file  two  appli¬ 
cations,  one  for  each  switch.  Bo  you  wish  these  applications 
\filed?  I  understand  that  this  apparatus  is  still  used. 


/L 


HL-JS 


Copy 


Ootober  10,  1916 

Mr.  Edison:- 

EOLIO  861  -  application  of  Sam  G.  Langley  for 
MeanB  for  Charging  Storage  Batteries 


This  application  covers  a  system  and  apparatus  for 
disconnecting  the  rectifying  devices  from  the  battery  when  the 
alternating  ourrent  fails  or  falls  below  predetermined  value 
and  for  reconnecting  the  same  when  the  ourrent  increases  to  a 
predetermined  value.  The  application  was  filed  with  claims 
for  the  system  and  also  claims  for  the  specific  magnetic  switches 
used  in  the  system.  Division  was  required  and  we  elected  to 
retain  the  claims  covering  the  system.  The  application  has  now 
been  allowed  with  very  good  claims  covering  the  system  -  see  for 
example  the  following  claims 


1.  In  a  system  of  the  class  described,  the  com¬ 
bination  of  a  storage  battery  and  means  for  supplying  uni¬ 
directional  ourrent  thereto,  including  a  souroe  of  alternat¬ 
ing  current,  rectifying  means,  and  means  controlled  by  the 
voltage  of  said  source  for  connecting  said  battery  to  said 
rectifying  means,  substantially  as  described. 

6.  In  a  system  of  the  class  described,  the  com¬ 
bination  of  a  storage  battery  and  means  for  supplying  uni¬ 
directional  ourrent  thereto,  including  a  souroe  of  ourrent, 
rectifying  means,  and  means  for  automatically  establishing 
connection  between..said  storage  battery  and  said  rectifying 
means  whenever  a  predetermined  electrical  condition  exiBts 
in  said  souroe,  substantially  as  described. 


6.  In  a  system  of  the  class  described,  the  com¬ 
bination  of  a  storage  battery  and  means  for  charging  the 
same,  including  a  souroe  of  alternating  ourrent,  rectify¬ 
ing  means,  and  contacts  for  making  and  breaking  connection 
between  the  battery  and  the  rectifying  means,  said  contacts 
being  automatically  moved  relatively  to  each  other  into 
circuit  making  or  breaking  position  aooording  to  the  eleo- 
trioal  condition  of  said  souroe,  substantially  as  described, 


i 


to  Mr.  Edison  with  application  Polio  861.  I  have  made  inquiries 
at  this  end,  hut  have  been  unable  to  learn  anything  about  the 
original  memorandum  and  the .folio  which  accompanied  it.  Our 
office  boy  remembers  taking  several  papers  over  to  the  laboratory 
last  week  but  does  not  remember  anything  about  this  particular  one, 


lit 


lo^  V  -  *'vl 

$o  v  ■  y"  i 


Folio  861 
rsafiT  G.  Langley 
Means  for  Char&igg  Storage  Batteries 
Serial  JJo.  704,338 
Filed  June  18,  1912 
/Allowed  July  22,  1916 
Final  Fee. Due  Jan.  22,  1917. 


l  7/  ; 


Mr.  Holden: 


J/»u 

AnjQ  foreign  applications?  ~y\yO 


.  assigned  to  Thomas  A.  Edison, 
,so,  tb  whom?  X ,T.  FJCZ-i-  Co 


Patent  Series 
Patent  Application  Files 

Folio#  860  Production  of  Sound-Records 

U.S.  Patent#:  1282011 

Primary  Applicant:  Aylsworth,  Jonas  W 
Date  Executed:  6/17/1912 


memorandum 


MEMORANDUM 


«^(L<rv^d^<^&}_  ' 

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Patent  Series 
Patent  Application  Files 


Folio  #  866  Process  of  Making  Screens  for  Projection 
U.S.  Patent#:  1266778 


Primary  Applicant:  Edison,  Thomas  A 
Date  Executed:  6/19/1912 


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APPLICATION  POL. 

I  hand  yon  .herewith  our  copies  of  the  papers 
your  application  Serial  No.  705.648  filed  June  24,  1912 
titled  SCREENS  FOR  PROJECTION  AND  PROCESS  OP  MAKING  THE  SAlfe^. 

This  application  relates  to  a  motion  picture  scr^ohj/ 
made  from  ordinary  oilcloth  hy  slightly  heating  the  oilcl^h^oj 
render  the  surface  thereof  tacky  and  applying  thereto  a*r£^lct- 
ing  coating  of  powdered  aluminum  or  powdered  aluminum  and  pow¬ 
dered  bronze,  and  applying  to  the  latter  coating  a  protective 
coating  of ^drying  oil  such  as  a  mixture  of  linseed  oil,  turpen¬ 
tine  and  white  japan  drier. 

All  the  claims  now  in  the  application  relating  to 
the  process  of  making  the  screen, seven  in  number,  have  been 
allowed,  of  which  the  following  will  serve  as  an  example: 


•S.  The  process  of  making  screens  for  projection  pur¬ 
poses,  which  consists  in  heating  oilcloth  until  the  oilcloth 
surface  becomes  soft  and  somewhat  sticky,  applying  powdered 
material  containing  a  metal  to  the  softened  and  sticky  sur¬ 
face,  and  rubbing  the  said  material  into  the  surface, substantially 
as  described. 

All  the  claims,  six  in  number,  relating  to  the 
article,  however,  have  been  finally  rejected  on  U.S.  patent 
to  Price  No.  995,289  dated  June  13,  1911,  and  French  patent 
to  Pey  No.  388,978,  copies  of  which  patents  are  attached 
hereto.  The  following  will  serv4  as  an  example  of  the 
article  claim* ; 


-2- 


/  A  screen  for  projection  purposes,  consisting  of 
oilcloth  having  metallic  material  adhering  to  the  oilcloth 
coating  to  produce  a  partially  reflecting  surface,  said 
surface  having  a  thin  coating  of  drying  oil  dried  thereon, 
substantially  as  described. 

Kindly  advise  whether  or  not  you  wish  an  appeal 
taken  in  this  application  on  the  article  claims. 

In  case  you  do  not  wish  an  appeal  taken  will  you 
please  advise  whether  you  wish  the  patent  taken  out  with 
the  process  claims,  or  the  application  abandoned. 

I  understand  that  the  screen  described  in  this 
application  is  of  no  commercial  value  to  us  at  the  present 
time. 

WH-EH 


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